About Simon Mair

  Simon is an ecological economist, trying to understand the current economy in order to build a better one. Simon’s research interests include the history of economic thought, utopian economics, and various kinds of models. He is currently working the ways labour and capital have been conceptualised in different theories of production, and where energy ought to enter into these theories; Stock Flow Consistent modelling of no-growth economies; and exploring the economic potential of utopian fiction. Simon is a co-investigator on the ESRC funded ‘Powering Productivity‘ project, exploring links between energy, wellbeing and the UK’s productivity puzzle and a Research Fellow with the Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity. He also teaches at Salford University, and holds a PhD in Ecological Economics from the University of Surrey (UK), an MA in Environmental Management and a BSc in Environmental Science both from the University of Lancaster (UK). Simon is also UK country contact for the European Society for Ecological Economics (ESEE).

Posts by Simon Mair:

Ridding ourselves of the productivity fetish will help us combat climate change

Ridding ourselves of the productivity fetish will help us combat climate change

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Climate action is often about sacrifice: eat less meat, don’t fly, and buy less stuff. These things are essential. But climate action can also be about gain. Many causes of climate change make our lives worse. So transforming our societies to stop climate change offers us the chance to make our lives better. More →

Climate change demands we shift our focus from productivity

Climate change demands we shift our focus from productivity

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climate change and productivity <img src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/123541/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-advanced" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important" />Climate action is often about sacrifice: eat less meatdon’t fly, and buy less stuff. These things are essential. But climate action can also be about gain. Many causes of climate change make our lives worse. So transforming our societies to stop climate change offers us the chance to make our lives better. More →

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