Review advises employers should devise elder care policies as pension age increases

Review advises employers should devise elder care policies as pension age increases

A review of the state pension age (SPA) led by former Confederation of British Industry (CBI) director general John Cridland has recommended that the State Pension age shouldn’t rise to 68 until between 2037 and 2039 and should not increase more than 1 year in any 10 year period. The report has also advised that all employers should have elder care policies in place which set out a basic care offer and that people should be able to access a mid-life career MOT and review which should be facilitated by employers and by the government using online support and through the National Careers Service. Commenting on the report, which will be considered before any decision is made on changes to the State Pension age timetable after 2028, the Centre for Ageing Better has welcomed its recommendations on wider actions to mitigate the impact of bringing the timetable forward for increases to the State Pension Age.

Anna Dixon, Chief Executive of the Centre for Ageing Better, said: “We welcome the review’s recommendations on wider actions to mitigate the impact of bringing the timetable forward for increases to the State Pension Age.

“For those with poor long-term health or disability who are unable to work up to State Pension Age, Cridland has made some recommendations on changes to the benefits system to reduce potential hardship that many will suffer as a result of these increases.

“Simply raising the State Pension Age without additional support will leave many people further away from a secure later life. Currently, less than half of people are working the year before they reach State Pension Age. Wider action is needed to make the labour market fit for purpose if people are to work for longer.

“We urge employers to make workplaces and employment practices more age friendly. This means recognising the contribution that older workers make, treating them fairly, especially when it comes to opportunities for development and progression, and tackling all forms of ageism and discrimination in the workplace. The proposals for mid-life MOTs and supporting older workers to become mentors and trainers are welcome.

“We know that people aged 50 and over are more likely to have caring responsibilities and/or health conditions. We welcome the recommendation for statutory carers leave. Flexible working arrangements that allow people to balance health, care and work are essential.”

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