The four day week might be the wellbeing solution workers need

The four day week might be the wellbeing solution workers need

Mental health and four day weekIt’s been a couple of months now since 70 companies in Britain began their four day week pilot program, where thousands of employees went from celebrating the Queen’s 70th Jubilee to celebrating shorter work weeks without reduction in pay for the remainder of 2022. The pilot had been highly anticipated by workers and employers alike – and has already seen tremendous results — but it’s also created a heated debate on whether it’s actually workable across industries, demographics, and different sized companies. More →

Getting back to the future of work

Getting back to the future of work

future of workQuoting George Orwell is the kind of thing that people who haven’t read George Orwell do. I have read Orwell, and even have a  drunken story about Paul Shane signing my copy of the Collected Essays, which was the only autograph-able material I had on me at the time I met him in a pub in about 1990. For another time. In Nineteen Eighty-Four, Orwell describes Winston Smith’s realisation that the best books are those that tell you what you already know. This is an ancient profundity, and one that is sort of useful during times of significant, rapid change, when we are obliged to confront old truths in a new context. History doesn’t repeat itself, it rhymes, as they say. More →

Podcast: the weak arguments in favour of offices and the problem with the future of work

Podcast: the weak arguments in favour of offices and the problem with the future of work

future of work and real estateMark Eltringham the publisher of Workplace Insight and IN Magazine recently joined Caleb Parker, the founder of Bold, on his Work Bold podcast for an unscripted chat on: the future of work and how it may shape the future of commercial real estate; the reasons why anybody might ever want to go back to an office to work; the problem with weak arguments both for and against offices; and the importance of culture and flexibility rather than fixed times and places of work in determining people’s day to day experiences of work. The prompt for this conversation was the occasional discussion on social media over the past couple of years and a recent article exploring the value of weak tiesMore →

Generational careers divide opens up in wake of pandemic

Generational careers divide opens up in wake of pandemic

careers divideAlmost half of UK employees aged between 18 and 24 think that COVID-19 has decreased the importance placed on their careers, compared to 35 percent of 55-64 year-olds. And more than half think the pandemic has negatively impacted their career progression, compared to just 35 percent of 35-44 year olds and 17 percent of 54-65 year olds. Those are the key findings of a poll presented in a report from Employment Hero, shows that COVID-19 has caused a widening generational divide in the career motivation and wellbeing of UK employees. More →

Hybrid working success depends on the creation of ‘digital HQs’

Hybrid working success depends on the creation of ‘digital HQs’

hybrid workingAround three quarters of people think that so-called digital HQs are fundamental to making hybrid working a success, according to a new report from Slack. The study also claims to reveals how both virtual and in-person office etiquette has changed along with new workplace habits. The survey of over 1,000 UK office workers suggests that the majority (73 percent) believe hybrid working is ‘here to stay’ and 53 percent think businesses should operate on a digital-first approach. Spending more time at home is a must for most with over 3 in 5 (66 percent) likely to start looking for a new job if hybrid or remote working is not offered. Over two-thirds believing hybrid work has helped them with the cost of living crisis, with less being spent on transport and lunches. More →

Have we arrived at a point of equilibrium in the great workplace conversation?

Have we arrived at a point of equilibrium in the great workplace conversation?

Perhaps the greatest irony of the tedious home v office debate is that the absolutists on both sides rely on many of the same fallacies. They tend to build their arguments around a simplistic view of the office and remote work that has little basis in reality. Unsurprisingly, when they do get their way, reality often bites them in the arse. More →

Digital presenteeism now a pervasive cultural pressure

Digital presenteeism now a pervasive cultural pressure

digital presenteeismDamaging habits from the office have been imported into remote work, with a pervasive culture of digital presenteeism taking hold, according to a new report Killing Time at Work from Qatalog and GitLab Inc. The research also claims to reveal a new phenomenon which the authors have dubbed ‘async privilege’, with C-suite execs taking advantage of new freedoms to work on their own schedule, but not providing those same opportunities to junior members of staff. More →

Four day week seen as unrealistic for millions of people

Four day week seen as unrealistic for millions of people

four day weekInterest in the four day work week is rising yet millions of UK workers are set to miss out, according to research from ClickUp. It found that certain careers are more likely to miss out on the idea of working a day less each week for no reduction in pay, as other employment sectors may go ahead. Businesses must take action to close these gaps to create equity for workers in the UK, the report argues. More →

The future of work is asynchronous

The future of work is asynchronous

future of workIn our pre-, post-, and mid-pandemic worlds, the corporate workspace landscape underwent – and continues to undergo – a great many adaptations. It is changing out of necessity so firms can survive in a new present and future of work. The way we work had never evolved as much as it has in the past 2 years. It was dominated by strict schedules, physical meetings and on-site technology only. As time passed and technology evolved, the 9-to-5 in-office schedule remained, and teleworking, despite being possible, was extremely rare.

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95 percent of organisations have experienced issues implementing hybrid working

95 percent of organisations have experienced issues implementing hybrid working

hybrid workingA new poll from XpertHR claims that nearly all UK organisations (95 percent) have encountered challenges implementing hybrid working, with reluctance to return to the workplace the leading issue currently faced by employers. Of the 292 organisations XpertHR surveyed, almost all (95 percent) operate a hybrid model. For most (59 percent) organisations, staff generally spend between 2-3 days working from home each week, however, over a third (37 percent) of staff are unhappy with this split and would prefer to spend even less time in the office. More →

UK ranks 17th worldwide for remote work

UK ranks 17th worldwide for remote work

remote workingThe UK ranks 17th in the world for remote work, according to a new report released by NordLayer. The report evaluated 66 countries in total. The report claims that the two biggest factors in the UK’s score are a relatively low cybersecurity ranking and a lower than expected digital and physical infrastructure ranking. The report concludes that the UK is not necessarily unsafe to work digitally but is taking longer than other countries to adapt and evolve digital practices and standards. More →

Working from home has more than doubled in the UK since 2019

Working from home has more than doubled in the UK since 2019

working from homeThe number of people working from home in the UK from October to December 2019 and January to March 2022 has increased by 108.8 percent, according to the latest employment data from the Office for National Statistics. Between the two periods, the number of home workers increased from 4.7 million to 9.9 million. The number of homeworkers increased by more than 50 percent in all UK regions. More →

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