About Mark Eltringham

Mark is the publisher of Workplace Insight, IN magazine, Works magazine and is the European Director of Work&Place journal. He has worked in the office design and management sector for over thirty years as a journalist, marketing professional, editor and consultant.

Posts by Mark Eltringham:

The final word on … self-awareness

The final word on … self-awareness

Both ancient Stoic philosophy and modern therapeutic approaches prize self-awareness. Here's why The story goes that the great Roman philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius hired a servant to follow him around. The man had only one job. Whenever anybody bowed to the emperor, or said something in praise of him, the servant would whisper in his ear: “You’re just a man. You’re just a man.” Whether this achieved anything isn’t clear, but it was a sign that Marcus Aurelius  was at least trying to practice what he preached. In his Meditations, he wrote: “These are the characteristics of the rational soul: self-awareness, self-examination, and self-determination. It reaps its own harvest. It succeeds in its own purpose.” More →

More content! New themes! New font! Same old team! It’s all there for you in this issue of Works magazine

More content! New themes! New font! Same old team! It’s all there for you in this issue of Works magazine

 

The digital issue of Works magazine is now available for you here. And it's bigger, and dare we say better, than ever.

The digital edition of the new Works magazine is now available for you here. And it’s bigger, and dare we say better, than ever. In this issue: we look back on Milan Design Week and forward to Clerkenwell Design Week; there are no fewer than four projects highlighting the latest design trends and thinking; we present the award winners from the Sustainable Design Collective; explore how biophilia shouldn’t just be about a plant in the office and a picture of field on the wall; set out the most important office trends; consider the always thorny issue of office acoustics and distraction, and showcase a new generation of products that help to address it; catch up for a drink with our friends at Modus; pay tribute to the great Gaetano Pesce; and there’s all the news, launches and projects you need.

More →

People don’t hear back from half of the jobs for which they apply

People don’t hear back from half of the jobs for which they apply

British job seekers don’t hear back from almost half (45 percent) of the jobs they apply for, according to a new poll from Indeed. According to ONS data, there are 916,000 job vacancies in the UK, but with frustrations around the hiring process, these aren’t set to be filled quickly or effectively. The survey of 1,000 working people and 1,000 hiring professionals in the UK shows that the hiring process is inefficient for both job seekers and businesses, delaying the right candidate being matched with the right role. More →

Beware the workplace mouse trap

Beware the workplace mouse trap

Life imitates art part 94. Scientists have discovered that lab mice may be conducting their own experiments on us. A paper published in the journal Current Biology and summarised here, speculates that mice seem to be testing their testers. They do this by deviating from simple expected behaviours such as responding to rewards to work out what might happen. More →

Stress, anxiety and a beamish response to it all

Stress, anxiety and a beamish response to it all

Stress, uncertainty and the medicalisation of dissatisfactionWe now have a policy of not offering ourselves as an outlet for any of the deluge of comment pieces and surveys that are published each year to accompany the various days – and increasingly weeks and months – dedicated to certain conditions like stress and anxiety. They are a gift both to and from the PR industry. This is largely because we cover such issues year round so don’t feel the need to add to the PR feeding frenzy they generate. Whatever you make of the findings of the reports and others like them, even cynics would have to acknowledge they tap into an unmistakable feeling that work is not as enjoyable as it should be. More →

Office rent, costs and utilisation rates rise as firms focus on prime space

Office rent, costs and utilisation rates rise as firms focus on prime space

Prime office rents in major cities around the world have risen 1.1 percent in the past year (Q1 2023 to Q1 2024) while tenants’ ‘all-in’ net effective costs (rent plus fit-out costs) have risen 2.4 percent, according to Savills, as the structural trend towards seeking high quality premium office space continues into 2024. More →

We can have a dramatic impact on people’s lives with simple, small and cost-free changes

We can have a dramatic impact on people’s lives with simple, small and cost-free changes

London, the crouching monster, like every other monster has to breathe, and breathe it does in its own obscure, malignant way. Its vital oxygen is composed of suburban working men and women of all kinds, who every morning are sucked up through an infinitely complicated respiratory apparatus of trains and termini into the mighty congested lungs, held there for a number of hours, and then, in the evening, exhaled violently through the same channels. More →

Don’t worry, be ‘appy. IN Magazine issue 20 is here for you

Don’t worry, be ‘appy. IN Magazine issue 20 is here for you

The new digital edition of IN Magazine is now available to read online.The new digital edition of IN Magazine is now available to read online. In this issue: reviews of both MIPIM and the Workspace Design Show; a reappraisal of scientific management; what the new generation of workplace apps tell us about how we work; a case study that prompts the question of why office designers don’t make more use of reused products; the road to hell is paved with bad information; Domino Risch on the workplace’s Kodak moment; why facilities managers are the goalkeepers of the workplace; the final word on self-awareness; and much more.  More →

Majority of people feel confident in their ability to adapt to era of AI

Majority of people feel confident in their ability to adapt to era of AI

Following yesterday’s news about the fears CEOs harbour with the advent of AI in the workplace, a new poll from Indeed suggests that nearly 9 in 10 UK workers (89 percent) feel confident in their ability to adapt to change over the next five years. According to the survey, nearly two-thirds (63 percent) feel the skills needed for their role will change in the next five years, with 15 percent expecting significant changes. More →

The scale of the problem for the workplace

The scale of the problem for the workplace

There is a typically telling and intelligent Pixar moment in the film A Bug’s Life in which an already well-lubricated mosquito goes up to a bar and orders a ‘Bloody Mary, O Positive’. The barman plonks a droplet of blood down on the bar. The mosquito sinks his proboscis into it, sucks it down in one go and promptly falls over. The mosquito doesn’t need a glass because that is for animals who have a problem with gravity. For insects, the major force in their lives isn’t gravity, but surface tension. More →

A just in time lesson about office design

A just in time lesson about office design

The nascent years of new ways of working in the late 80s and early 90s coincided with a widely held but soon to be discarded belief that the Japanese had cracked management practices. So it was perhaps inevitable that the principles of a process called just in time manufacturing – most famously applied in the factories of Toyota – should migrate to new forms of office design and the rapidly developing practice of flexible working.

More →

British workers now entirely unproductive, claims report

British workers now entirely unproductive, claims report

The overwhelming majority of UK workers don’t do anything productive at all, according to a new report published today. The study of available research into the illnesses, injuries, distractions, wastes of time, procrastinations, productivity drains and paralyses that afflict British workers found that the annual cost to the British economy is around £1.8 trillion, equivalent to 98.9 percent of GDP.

More →