Issue 13 of IN Magazine celebrates ten years of workplace insight

Issue 13 of IN Magazine celebrates ten years of workplace insight

The new issue of In Magazine has now been published. It marks ten years of Workplace Insight with a few things we think we know about work, working culture and work places.The new issue of In Magazine has now been published. It marks ten years of Workplace Insight with a few things we think we know about work, working culture and work places. Elsewhere in this issue: Stephanie Fitzgerald talks about the unspoken privilege of wellbeing; we consider the sprawl of the world’s megacities; Jo Knight argues that the office sector needs to really up its game on the environment; Rene Stevens makes the case for a strategic approach to learning environments; we weigh up the pros and cons of retrofit and new builds; Neil Usher sets out to develop a universally acceptable definition of hybrid working; Andy Brown on what we really need data for; why dead tech hangs around; and we do the maths on what it means when people say the office should be worth the commute it takes to get to it. More →

Logovisual feature-packed mobile walls designed to divide and connect

Logovisual feature-packed mobile walls designed to divide and connect

The ThinkingWall Divider range from Logovisual is a collection of sleek, stable dividing mobile walls featuring web connected AV technology, drywipe surface and storageThe ThinkingWall Divider range from Logovisual is a collection of sleek, stable mobile dividing walls featuring web connected AV technology, drywipe surface and storage. The units are large enough to work alone or in pairs as a divider, but easy to move around to reconfigure space. Use ThinkingWall Dividers to split larger areas with no need for any floor or ceiling mounting. Create focus areas where teams can gather round the drywipe board without the need for a wall to mount to. The mobile walls are multi-functional, practical and fit perfectly with a modern hybrid work environment. More →

Siemens and Skyway collaborate to develop infrastructure to pave way for Vertiports

Siemens and Skyway collaborate to develop infrastructure to pave way for Vertiports

Siemens and Skyway have reached an agreement to work together to determine the electrical and digital infrastructure needed to support vertiportsSiemens and Skyway have reached an agreement to work together to determine the electrical and digital infrastructure needed to support vertiport operations. Vertiports are hubs for vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) vehicles such as air taxis and drones. The scope of collaboration involves both companies researching energy demands of vertiports and developing sustainable electrical supply, standard charging processes, and a “system of systems” to support aircraft operations. Innovation around vertiport infrastructure will be critical to the future scalability of electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) flight operations. More →

It’s hard to keep dead tech down

It’s hard to keep dead tech down

People are curiously slow to give up on dead tech, sometimes for sound practical reasons and sometimes not so muchIn 2022, Cormac McCarthy published two novels at the age of 89. An impressive feat, doubly so because he wrote them on the same old dead tech typewriter he’d bought from a pawn shop in 1963. He no longer has the original, a light blue Olivetti Lettera 32, because that was sold at a charity auction for a quarter of million dollars in 2009. A friend replaced it with an identical model for just $11. But one that lacked the cultural imprint, clearly. More →

AI presents us with a chance to rediscover what it means to be human

AI presents us with a chance to rediscover what it means to be human

We won't beat AI by relying on formulaic thinking and ideas, so we need to rethink creativity and what it means to be humanLike a lot of people right now, I am struggling to get my head around where we are going with AI. Look around and you’ll see the breathless excitement at the sheer amazingness of it all. And examples of its limitations, how it screws up, how military grade AI can be fooled by somebody hiding in a box, and its sense of humour failure. All of this is demonstrably, paradoxically true. More →

Vast majority of IT managers prioritise commercial success over sustainability

Vast majority of IT managers prioritise commercial success over sustainability

A new poll claims that the vast majority of tech managers prioritise commercial success over sustainability, despite the fact that nearly all agree with the idea that sustainability is good for businessA new poll claims that the vast majority of tech managers prioritise commercial success over sustainability, despite the fact that nearly all agree with the idea that sustainability is good for business. The report from Software AG is based on a survey of 2,000 senior IT decision-makers from the US, Canada, UK, Germany and France. It suggests that most organisations prioritise commercial objectives over sustainability in the face of economic challenges. This is despite the fact that almost all (95 percent) leaders agree sustainability is either a top or high priority and a similar number (97 percent) agree that other firms’ sustainability credentials are either essential or important in their own buying decisions. The annual Reality Check reports seeks to investigate how technology initiatives can benefit both sustainability and commercial objectives. More →

Ten years of Insight and a few things I think I know

Ten years of Insight and a few things I think I know

This website started in late 2012 as a way for me to explore both a new media format and a new way of thinking about work and workplaces. I’d already been active in various roles in the workplace, design and facilities sector for twenty odd years, but needed a new challenge. And this was it. I was going for a ride with an idea to see where it went. More →

Three year hike in the number of one-to-one and ad hoc virtual meetings

Three year hike in the number of one-to-one and ad hoc virtual meetings

Two people in an example of virtual meetingsA new study from Vyopta claims there has been a significant increase in the number of one-to-one virtual meetings and ad hoc collaboration on digital meeting platforms over the past three years. Its paper The Evolution of Hybrid Work: A Three-Year Analysis based on data from around 48 million meetings held in 2020, 2021, and 2022 measured engagement trends over time and studied how the workforce is adapting to remote-first and hybrid collaboration. More →

Never mind the workplace predictions, here’s some bollocks

Never mind the workplace predictions, here’s some bollocks

A painting of Janus to depict the number of workplace predictions and retrospectives at the end of the yearTime of the year for looking backwards and forwards. For workplace predictions and retrospectives. The Economist announces that the word / term of the year is hybrid work. This is interesting because, although The Economist is using it as an interchangeable term for flexible working as many do, a great deal of energy is still expounded on defining exactly what it means. We may work out when the obsession with three days in the office, two at home thing started. But for now, determining where people are at any given time doesn’t seem very flexible to me. More →

People want their offices to perform more like hotels

People want their offices to perform more like hotels

Soft seating from Connection furniture that could be set in offices or hotelsEmployees today want more ‘hotel-style’ amenities such as areas for socialising, state-of-the-art infrastructure, outdoor spaces, onsite cafes, air conditioning, and flexible work facilities to entice them back to offices, according to a new poll from MRI Software. The firm’s Workplace Report [registration] claims almost two-thirds (64 percent) of respondents say such hotel-style features impact their decision on whether to work for an organisation, including more than one in ten who see failure to provide the right amenities as a deal breaker. More →

Hybrid working not always well supported by current tech infrastructure

Hybrid working not always well supported by current tech infrastructure

A steampunk office illustrating the poor state of tech supporting hybrid workingAlmost two thirds (63 percent) of IT directors are not very confident in their IT estate’s ability to fully support hybrid working, but over seven-in ten (71 percent) of organisations are not placing IT investment at the top of the priority list. These are among the findings from a new poll undertaken by Apogee Corporation. Due to limitations with the current IT setup, 89 percent of respondents identify that it is preventing effective collaboration, with almost half (48 percent) admitting that remote staff don’t have access to the same solutions as office workers. More →

The Great Relearning about the Great Office Problem

The Great Relearning about the Great Office Problem

A person using computer in style of edward hopper in an office at nightOne of the latest people to invent activity-based working is sociologist Ana Andjelic, who combines it with the similarly familiar hub and spoke office model on her substack as a solution to the Great Office Problem. She’s not the first and is a less surprising pioneer of a decades old model than some other people who should really know better. That includes an architectural practice who came up with the idea earlier this year and whose name escapes me. More →

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