Business leaders struggling to navigate rapid change, report claims

Business leaders struggling to navigate rapid change, report claims

Amidst volatile markets and the rapid technological transformation taking place with AI, business leaders are at an inflection point as they attempt to navigate both new and existing challengesAmidst volatile markets and the rapid technological transformation taking place with AI, business leaders are at an inflection point as they attempt to navigate both new and existing challenges – and it’s taking a toll on executive tenure. According to a new survey conducted by LHH, a talent advisory and solutions company, executives across various industries and countries are grappling with formidable challenges, with technological advancements taking centre stage in their concerns. The survey, titled View from the C-Suite: Bridging the executive gap, reveals some of the key insights and recommendations for senior executives as they begin 2024. More →

Two in five architects say they are already using AI on projects

Two in five architects say they are already using AI on projects

New research by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) suggests that 41 percent of UK architects are already using artificial intelligence (AI) on at least the occasional projectNew research by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) suggests that 41 percent of UK architects are already using artificial intelligence (AI) on at least the occasional project, and of those, 43 percent think it has made the design process more efficient. The RIBA AI report includes the findings of a survey asking architects how they are using and plan to use AI. In the next 2 years, 54 percent of architects expect their practice to use AI, and 57 percent think it will improve efficiency in the design process. However, this ambition this doesn’t yet seem to be matched by investment, as 69 percent say their practice has not invested in AI research and development, and only 41 percent expect their practice to invest. More →

University of Warwick receives £1.25 million to research how AI could change the market for real estate

University of Warwick receives £1.25 million to research how AI could change the market for real estate

The University of Warwick has received a £1.25 million donation to launch the FutureFinance.AI Research Group that could transform the way the world purchases, sells, rents and handles real estate over the next five yearsThe University of Warwick has received a £1.25 million donation to launch the FutureFinance.AI Research Group that could transform the way the world purchases, sells, rents and handles real estate over the next five years. Based in the Gillmore Centre for Financial Technology at Warwick Business School, the new Research Group will draw interdisciplinary scholars and thinkers from across the world to redefine and innovate the financial and property technology landscape. More →

Growing number of firms tracking activity of remote workers

Growing number of firms tracking activity of remote workers

Nearly half of enterprises are collecting data on the hours of remote workers, with another33 percent planning to do so in futureNearly half of enterprises (44 percent) are collecting data on the working hours of remote workers, with an additional 33 percent planning to do so in future, according to a new report from Kinly, The company’s Trusted Connections 2024 study surveyed 425 enterprise AV professionals working in the UK, Germany, Nordics, and the Netherlands. It suggests that 65 percent of enterprises are encouraging staff to install Internet of Things (IoT) devices into their homes, while a third (33 percent) are also investing in analytics platforms to monitor remote workers. More →

FAANGs for the memories: how tech palaces lost their lustre

FAANGs for the memories: how tech palaces lost their lustre

With the downfall of wunderkind Sam Bankman-Fried and the demise of his Bahamas HQ, does this mean that instead of being heralded as inspiration, tech palaces have instead become dated and toothlessI was alerted by the great Jack Pringle during a presentation course he was giving to an unforgettable YouTube clip of Steve Jobs speaking to the local council as part of a planning application for his Apple Park in California, one of the great tech palaces that sprang up in the wake of the digital revolution. Jobs, in familiar black polo neck jumper and wire-rimmed spectacles, took the officials of Cupertino City Council on a journey of opportunity, awe and inspiration. More →

They call it mellow yellow. Issue 19 of IN Magazine lands

They call it mellow yellow. Issue 19 of IN Magazine lands

The new issue of IN Magazine has been published today.The new issue of IN Magazine has been published online today. In this issue: we ask why firms are so reluctant to change what they do; a dream of the past and future of work; Andy Lake talks about his new, visionary book; how AI might make cities worse; what inclusive design means; a panel of experts discuss what changing work practices mean for major business districts; why we must rethink how we light our streets and squares; how to strike the right balance when it comes to creating meetings in offices; and we take a grand tour through the Bucharest HQ of the world’s biggest travel group. More →

How Gulliver’s Travels predicted AI and our attempts to make sense of it all

How Gulliver’s Travels predicted AI and our attempts to make sense of it all

Gullivers Travels includes a description of a machine that woks very like modern AI systems, and with the same drawbacksGulliver’s Travels is one of those books we assume we know. But what we tend to recall is some stuff about Lilliput, giants, talking horses and possibly something about scientists trying to extract sunbeams from cucumbers. It’s really about one man’s descent into disillusion with the human race. It is acerbic, occasionally tediously detailed, and offers insight into some aspects of the human condition, which makes it timeless. More →

Most firms don’t have AI guidance in place for internal comms

Most firms don’t have AI guidance in place for internal comms

Over two-thirds (71 percent) of organisations do not provide guidance on when, where or how to use AI for internal communicationsOver two-thirds (71 percent) of organisations do not provide guidance on when, where or how to use AI for internal communications, according to Gallagher’s 2023/24 State of the Sector report [registration]. Furthermore, the study, which drew insights from more than 2,300 communication and HR leaders across 56 countries, claims that 1 in 10 communicators (13 percent) were unsure if their organisation was using AI. More →

Of mice and men

Of mice and men

What humble computer mice can tell us about the way we now work. Or how the law of unintended consequences applies to hybrid workersThe history of the humble computer mouse dates back to the 1960s and engineer Douglas Engelbart’s work on improving the way people and computers interact. He initially called the device he envisaged a ‘bug’ but the first prototype he created with Bill English was so unmistakeably a rodent that there was only one thing they could have called it. If only they had settled the question of whether the plural was mouses or mice. More →

Hefty fine for Amazon has implications for employee surveillance policy

Hefty fine for Amazon has implications for employee surveillance policy

Recent advancements in employee surveillance technology and the rise in remote working have led to employers now having both the ability and the excuse to look over employees’ shouldersThe French data protection watchdog CNIL has fined Amazon France Logistique €32m, equivalent to 3 percent of the entity’s annual turnover, approaching the maximum permitted level of 4 percent. Describing Amazon’s employee surveillance as “excessive”, the regulator also cited instances where the monitoring of staff was found to be outright illegal, by breaching the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). More →

New RIBA guidance sets out to demystify smart building technology 

New RIBA guidance sets out to demystify smart building technology 

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has published its Smart Building Overlay to the RIBA Plan of Work. The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has published its Smart Building Overlay to the RIBA Plan of Work. Developed with ScanTech Digital, Glider Technology, Kier and Hoare Lea, RIBA says this free resource will support anyone involved in the design of newbuild, retrofit or refurbishment projects to implement smart building technology. The Smart Building Overlay introduces smart building terminology and outlines the benefits of embedding smart building technology from the outset. Its principles can be applied to projects of all scales and scopes. More →

Firms want to embrace AI, but bewildered by range of options

Firms want to embrace AI, but bewildered by range of options

The vast majority of Chief Information Officers plan to increase AI tool spending in 2024, but say their teams are overwhelmed by the number of apps on the marketThe vast majority of Chief Information Officers plan to increase AI tool spending in 2024, but say their teams are overwhelmed by the number of apps on the market. As a result, 77 percent are concerned about application sprawl adding to their complexity and security risks. That is according to a new report from Canva which includes insights from more than 1,360 CIOs on their priorities, opportunities and the challenges of managing their IT amid the AI boom. The company commissioned Harris Poll to survey CIOs from the UK, US, France, Germany, Spain, Brazil, Mexico, India, and Australia to understand how they’re managing application sprawl and making decisions about workplace tools in the AI era. More →