US and UK sign agreement on AI safety

US and UK sign agreement on AI safety

In a landmark agreement, the United States and the United Kingdom have pledged to collaborate on testing advanced AI safetyIn a landmark agreement, the United States and the United Kingdom have pledged to collaborate on testing advanced artificial intelligence (AI). This is the first-ever bilateral deal of its kind focused on AI safety. This agreement builds on commitments made at the AI Safety Summit last year, where both countries established AI Safety Institutes. These institutes will work together to develop robust methods for evaluating the safety of AI tools and systems. More →

FAANGs for the memories: how tech palaces lost their lustre

FAANGs for the memories: how tech palaces lost their lustre

With the downfall of wunderkind Sam Bankman-Fried and the demise of his Bahamas HQ, does this mean that instead of being heralded as inspiration, tech palaces have instead become dated and toothlessI was alerted by the great Jack Pringle during a presentation course he was giving to an unforgettable YouTube clip of Steve Jobs speaking to the local council as part of a planning application for his Apple Park in California, one of the great tech palaces that sprang up in the wake of the digital revolution. Jobs, in familiar black polo neck jumper and wire-rimmed spectacles, took the officials of Cupertino City Council on a journey of opportunity, awe and inspiration. More →

Up to 8 million UK jobs already at risk from AI without intervention

Up to 8 million UK jobs already at risk from AI without intervention

An analysis of the impact of generative artificial intelligence (AI) on the UK labour market uncovers a ‘distinct sliding doors moment’, with possibilities for huge job disruption in future or significant GDP gains, depending on government policy. The report from think tank the IPPR claims to identify two key stages of generative AI adoption: the first wave, which is here and now, and a second wave in which companies will integrate existing AI technologies further and more deeply into their processes. More →

Republic of Korea to join Horizon Europe programme

Republic of Korea to join Horizon Europe programme

Korea will join the growing group of countries associated to Horizon Europe, the EU research and innovation programmeKorea will join the growing group of countries associated with Horizon Europe, the EU research and innovation programme. Horizon Europe is the biggest EU research and innovation programme ever with a budget of €95.5 billion for the period 2021-27, complemented by the financial contributions from associated countries. It is open to the world, which means that participants from all over the world can participate in nearly all calls. Entities from associated countries have additional opportunities in collaborative projects and are treated on par with the entities of EU Member States regarding the access to funds. More →

AI will leave a lot of people with nowhere to go in the job market

AI will leave a lot of people with nowhere to go in the job market

Non-graduates, 'silver surfers' and those in lower socio-economic brackets will be left behind as AI creates a 'skills glass ceiling'Non-graduates, ‘silver surfers’ and those in lower socio-economic brackets will be left behind as the rise of AI creates a ‘skills glass ceiling’. That’s according to the latest Robert Half Jobs Confidence Index (JCI) – an economic confidence tracker produced in partnership with the Centre for Economics and Business Research (Cebr). The latest iteration of the Robert Half JCI revealed that almost half (45 percent) of the UK workforce is concerned that AI will disrupt their career in the next six to ten years. More →

AI is already transforming the legal sector, but challenges remain

AI is already transforming the legal sector, but challenges remain

As AI technologies continue to gain traction, just about every sector you can think of is going to face huge changes in the coming years – and that’s especially the case in the legal industry. From the rise of large language models (LLMs) to the integration of AI into existing software, this cutting-edge technology is already uprooting the way we work now, and it’s making us think deeply about what work will look like in the future. More →

Remote work leads to more people suffering from ‘phone anxiety’

Remote work leads to more people suffering from ‘phone anxiety’

A new poll suggests that four in 10 employees have experienced an increase in feelings of 'phone anxiety' as a result of remote workA new poll conducted by telephone answering provider, Face For Business, suggests that four in 10 employees have experienced an increase in feelings of ‘phone anxiety’ as a result of remote work. The survey also claims that those aged 18-34 bear the brunt of this heightened anxiety. The report claims that the driver of this surge in anxiety is alack of immediate support available to remote workers, which 12 percent of respondents cited as their primary concern when fielding calls from home. The authors suggest that the absence of colleagues just a desk away exacerbates feelings of isolation and uncertainty, leaving employees feeling adrift in the sea of incoming calls. More →

People are simply ignoring bans on AI use at work

People are simply ignoring bans on AI use at work

Employees say they are ignoring AI bans because it makes them more productive and better at their jobsOlder readers may remember a phenomenon called Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) which marked the point at which employers gave up worrying about people using their own phones at work and instead made it look like it was their idea anyway. A similar arc seems to be happening with AI, as people simply ignore their employers’ attempts to manage its use. A new poll from comms firm Definition suggests that over half of employed UK adults (54 percent) use tools like ChatGPT at work, despite 25 percent of businesses banning or significantly limiting its use. We have no other information on the methodology beyond that it was of 1,000 people. More →

Potential of AI is putting a smile on the faces of optimistic CEOs

Potential of AI is putting a smile on the faces of optimistic CEOs

CEOs are embracing artificial intelligence (AI) and investing in reskilling their people to ensure they have the capabilities to successfully exploit new technologies. The CEOs of the world’s largest companies are increasingly optimistic about future growth, with 66 percent highly positive about the global outlook over the next three to five years. This is the headline finding of the second annual Arthur D. Little (ADL) CEO Insights Study, which was launched today. The study found that whatever their strategy or sector, global CEOs are increasing their growth investments. Artificial intelligence (AI) is seen as crucial to growth, with 96 percent of CEOs having already deployed AI in some form, although, demonstrating the early stages of its adoption, just 13 percent have a compelling, enterprise-wide AI strategy in place. More →

Most firms set to invest in AI but half admit they don’t know why or how

Most firms set to invest in AI but half admit they don’t know why or how

A new poll from Orgvue, an organisational design and planning software platform, suggests that businesses continue to ramp up investment in AI despite being unclear on its business impact or how to implement itA new poll from Orgvue, an organisational design and planning software platform, suggests that businesses continue to ramp up investment in artificial intelligence despite being unclear on its business impact or how to implement it. Four in five (82 percent) of organisations have already invested, with another 33 percent saying they will increase this by more than 50 percent in the coming year.  Based on a survey of 1,000 C-suite and senior decision makers at medium and large organisations, the report, Human-first, machine enhanced: the role of AI in workforce transformation, highlights contradictions in the business community concerning technology investment and AI’s impact on the workforce. More →

Digital communication tools are a constant source of workplace strife

Digital communication tools are a constant source of workplace strife

A new poll of 4,000 knowledge workers in the UK, US, Germany and Australia suggests that digital communication tools are a constant source of strife in the workplaceA new poll of 4,000 knowledge workers in the UK, US, Germany and Australia suggests that digital communication tools are a constant source of strife in the workplace, especially between different generations of people. The poll from the Adapatavist Group, Mind the generational gap, was co-authored by Dr. Eliza Filby, a Historian of Generational Evolution. With half of companies now employing three or more generations, the report claims to reveal a pressing need for clear digital communication guidelines to support effective collaboration and workplace efficiency among diverse age groups. While highlighting areas of intergenerational friction, it also revealed large areas of mutual understanding and cooperation. More →

Three quarters of cybersecurity breaches are down to human error

Three quarters of cybersecurity breaches are down to human error

A new poll claims that 74 percent of all cybersecurity breaches are caused by human factorsA new poll claims that 74 percent of all cybersecurity breaches are caused by human factors. According to the data, published in  The State of Email and Collaboration Security 2024 report from Mimecast, cyber threats are growing at an unprecedented pace, and the year ahead is fraught with cybercrime and incidents anticipated ahead of the busy election year where over 50 countries head to the polls. With new threats like AI and deepfake technology, the stakes are higher than ever to execute a strong cyber defence. More →