Majority of young professionals feel happy about embracing AI in their lives

Majority of young professionals feel happy about embracing AI in their lives

More than half of young professionals feel comfortable or very confident about the increasing integration of AI in various aspects of daily lifeMore than half of young professionals feel comfortable or very confident about the increasing integration of artificial intelligence (AI) in various aspects of daily life, while only 15 percent reported feeling unsettled or scared about the prospect, according to new research from CEMS, the Global Alliance in Management Education. Half (50 percent) also stated that social media impacts their life positively, while only just over a quarter (27 percent) feel that social media has a negative impact on their lives. Overall, 70 percent of graduates said that they feel optimistic about the future. More →

AI may boost productivity, but we are already becoming reliant on it, and that’s a problem

AI may boost productivity, but we are already becoming reliant on it, and that’s a problem

A Stanford report says that as AI continues to develop, navigating its benefits and potential drawbacks will be crucial.Just ten years ago, AI systems couldn’t even classify images as well as humans. Now, they’re routinely outperforming people on a range of tasks, according to a new report from the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI). The 2024 AI Index is the latest update to the annual analysis of trends in artificial intelligence. Led by a team of experts from academia and industry, it’s one of the most in-depth reports on the technology and its impact available. This year’s edition tracks research, development, technical performance, responsible practices, economics, policy, public opinion, and more. More →

From pixels to patterns: the unprecedented surge in screen time

From pixels to patterns: the unprecedented surge in screen time

With the rise of remote work and online learning, our screen time has skyrocketed to unprecedented levels.Technology has transformed our personal relationships by making communication more accessible than ever before. But, are we implementing best practices to ensure a positive and sustainable relationship with our technological devices? In today’s digital age, screens have become an integral part of our daily lives. From smartphones and tablets to laptops and televisions, we are surrounded by screens at every turn. With the rise of remote work and online learning, our screen time has skyrocketed to unprecedented levels. More →

Don’t worry, be ‘appy. IN Magazine issue 20 is here for you

Don’t worry, be ‘appy. IN Magazine issue 20 is here for you

The new digital edition of IN Magazine is now available to read online.The new digital edition of IN Magazine is now available to read online. In this issue: reviews of both MIPIM and the Workspace Design Show; a reappraisal of scientific management; what the new generation of workplace apps tell us about how we work; a case study that prompts the question of why office designers don’t make more use of reused products; the road to hell is paved with bad information; Domino Risch on the workplace’s Kodak moment; why facilities managers are the goalkeepers of the workplace; the final word on self-awareness; and much more.  More →

Majority of people feel confident in their ability to adapt to era of AI

Majority of people feel confident in their ability to adapt to era of AI

Following yesterday’s news about the fears CEOs harbour with the advent of AI in the workplace, a new poll from Indeed suggests that nearly 9 in 10 UK workers (89 percent) feel confident in their ability to adapt to change over the next five years. According to the survey, nearly two-thirds (63 percent) feel the skills needed for their role will change in the next five years, with 15 percent expecting significant changes. More →

Siemens and Microsoft agree deal to unify digital twin languages

Siemens and Microsoft agree deal to unify digital twin languages

Half of bosses now live in fear that AI could steal their jobs

Half of bosses now live in fear that AI could steal their jobs

Hundreds of UK chief executives believe that artificial intelligence (AI) could steal their job, underlining widespread fears over the technology’s potential to shake up traditional working modelsHundreds of UK chief executives believe that artificial intelligence (AI) could steal their job, underlining widespread fears over the technology’s potential to shake up traditional working models. Nearly half (43 percent) of CEOs said they felt that their job could be at risk due to the technology, according to a new poll from AND Digital. The survey has been published in The CEO Digital Divide: are you accelerating enterprise value or slowing it down [registration], which surveyed 600 global CEOs and was conducted by independent research company Censuswide. More →

Microsoft announces new London AI research hub

Microsoft announces new London AI research hub

Microsoft AI is opening a new AI hub in Central London. The firm claims that the new Paddington based centre, dubbed Microsoft AI London will ‘drive pioneering work to advance state-of-the-art language models and their supporting infrastructure, and to create world-class tooling for foundation models’, collaborating closely with AI teams across Microsoft and with its partners, including OpenAI.  More →

Prioritising your phone over your partner affects women’s creativity at work

Prioritising your phone over your partner affects women’s creativity at work

Focusing attention on your mobile phone instead of your partner doesn’t just strain your relationship - it also affects creativity at work, according to researchersFocusing attention on your mobile phone instead of your partner doesn’t just strain your relationship – it also affects creativity at work, according to researchers from the Universities of Bath, Aston, and IESE Business School. The study claims to shed light on the negative effects of ‘phubbing’, the idea of snubbing someone in favour of your phone, which is known for its detrimental impact on relationships and mental wellbeing. Now the study of working couples in the US points to repercussions in the workplace as well, but only for female partners. More →

AI turns out to be an effective administrator for academics

AI turns out to be an effective administrator for academics

Researchers Maximilian Koehler, PhD candidate at ESMT, and Henry Sauermann, professor of strategy at ESMT, explore the role of AI, not as a “worker” performing specific research tasks such as data collection and analysis, but as a “manager” of human workers performing such tasks. Algorithmic management (AM) suggests a significant shift in the way research projects are conducted and can enable projects to operate at larger scale and efficiency. The study Algorithmic Management in Scientific Research is published in the journal Research Policy. More →

Virtual meetings can boost wellbeing and performance

Virtual meetings can boost wellbeing and performance

Virtual meetings – often derided as impersonal and prone to technical glitches – can improve employee wellbeing and performanceVirtual meetings – often derided as impersonal and prone to technical glitches – can improve employee wellbeing and performance, a new study led by a Trinity Business School researcher has found. The research, conducted alongside Karin S. Moser (UniDistance Suisse, University of Queensland), Stefan Diestel (University of Wuppertal) and Isaac Alshaikh (South East Technological University Waterford), conducted during the ongoing shift to hybrid work environments and just published in the Journal of Vocational Behavior, concludes that virtual meetings, a staple of the COVID-19 pandemic, are not just a necessity but can also be beneficial. More →

Policy response will determine if opportunities of AI in the workplace outweigh the risks

Policy response will determine if opportunities of AI in the workplace outweigh the risks

A new OECD report Using AI in the Workplace sets out to sheds light on the multifaceted impact of AI adoption, emphasising both its benefits and potential risksA new OECD report Using AI in the Workplace sets out to sheds light on the multifaceted impact of AI adoption, emphasising both its benefits and potential risks. According to the report, AI can bring significant benefits to the workplace. In the OECD AI surveys of employers and workers, four in five workers say that AI improved their performance at work and three in five say that it increased their enjoyment of work. But the benefits of AI depend on addressing the associated risks. Taking the effect of AI into account, occupations at highest risk of automation account for about 27 percent of employment in OECD countries. More →