Search Results for: flexible working

Workers may have new rights to request flexible working, but let’s not celebrate too soon

Workers may have new rights to request flexible working, but let’s not celebrate too soon

New flexible working rules are intended to normalise flexible work. However, in reality, they may do the opposite, says Molly Johnson-JonesThe new flexible working rules which came into force this month have been touted as a win – normalising and bringing clarity to the world of flexible work. However, in reality, they will do the very opposite. Under the new rules, workers now have the right to request flexible working from day one of employment. However, employers can take up to 2 whole months to respond to requests, and they do not have to be clear about their stance on flexible work beforehand. This is a huge oversight. Many workers rely on flexible working, and therefore need to know if arrangements are possible before they start new roles. Employers must be clear about their approach to flexible working from the outset, if we want to normalise flexibility in a way that allows both businesses and workers to benefit. More →

New issue of IN Magazine + All you need to know about new flexible working rights + A warning from history about office design

New issue of IN Magazine + All you need to know about new flexible working rights + A warning from history about office design

Insight Weekly includes a round up of the best stories and commentary from the past seven days. It includes free premium content including features, podcasts, supplements and a link to the digital editions of IN Magazine and Works Magazine. In this week’s issue: it now costs more to commute by train than car in the UK; everything you need to know about flexible working rights and other new legislation; the new issue of IN Magazine; what remote work is doing to people’s pay and careers; and a thirty year old take about an office design that has lessons for today; our Events diary; and much more. You can subscribe to this and our magazines here.

Flexible working rights stand to benefit millions of people

Flexible working rights stand to benefit millions of people

From today (April 6th 2024), UK employees will have the legal right to request flexible working from their first day in a new job.From today (April 6th 2024), UK employees will have the legal right to request flexible working from their first day in a new job. Under the updated regulations, employers must engage in discussions with employees and consider alternative solutions before declining a flexible working request. Decisions on applications must now be made within two months, reducing the previous timeframe of three months, which includes any appeals. Additionally, employees will be entitled to submit two flexible working requests within a 12-month period, rather than the previous allowance of one. More →

Half of workers say they are ready to take advantage of new flexible working laws

Half of workers say they are ready to take advantage of new flexible working laws

more than half (55 percent) of respondents to a poll are planning to make a new request for flexible working when new rules come into UK law this weekendBusinesses are being advised to brace themselves as a new poll claims more than half (55 percent) of respondents are planning to make a new request for flexible working when new rules come into UK law this weekend. The changes introduced by the Flexible Working Bill on April 6 – allowing workers to ask for flexible forms of work from day one of their employment (previously six months)  – look set to lead to a sharp increase in flexible working requests even though 74 percent of employees report already having some degree of flexibility.  More →

Most US firms are yet to match their culture to the demands of flexible working

Most US firms are yet to match their culture to the demands of flexible working

most employers have not adapted their working culture and practices  to support the shift to flexible workingA survey of 900 leaders in HR, real estate, IT, and product roles at US based firms suggests that most employers have not adapted their working culture and practices  to support the shift to flexible working. In addition, according to The 2024 Workplace Flexibility Trends Report from TechSmith Corporation in partnership with workplace research firm Global Workplace Analytics and Caryatid Workplace Consultancy three quarters of workers have yet to receive any training for the rise of flexible working arrangements. More →

UK businesses risk losing out on top female talent due to ability to support hybrid and flexible working

UK businesses risk losing out on top female talent due to ability to support hybrid and flexible working

Ahead of International Women’s Day, new data from Ricoh Europe claims that UK and Irish businesses risk losing out on top female talent due to an inability to support workplace flexibility, exacerbated by a lack of technology and fit-for-purpose people policy. The research, conducted by Opinium and analysed by CEBR on behalf of Ricoh Europe, polled 1,000 workers and 250 decision-makers across the UK and Ireland. Insights reveal a significant gender gap in the desire for flexibility and hybrid working arrangements. While both genders see benefits, 10 percent more women, over half (51 percent), agree that hybrid working improves their work-life balance, compared with only 39 percent of men. In addition, 40 percent of women actively seek employers offering hybrid models, a higher percentage than men. More →

Rejection of flexible working request shouldn’t blind employers to their legal duties

Rejection of flexible working request shouldn’t blind employers to their legal duties

Amy Leech of Shoosmiths looks at a recent case following the rejection of a flexible working request and considers its implicationsFlexible working has continued in many workforces since the pandemic. The most common pattern is a hybrid one where employees split their time between the office and home. However some employees are now looking to work remotely on a permanent basis. This is what happened in Wilson v Financial Conduct Authority 2302739/2023. The Claimant submitted a flexible working application requesting to work entirely remotely using her computer and other electronic equipment and to complete all her work without attending a physical office location. The Respondent’s policy was that post-pandemic, the Claimant was expected to work in the office 40 percent of the time and could work the other 60 percent remotely. More →

Many people would forgo a pay rise in favour of flexible working

Many people would forgo a pay rise in favour of flexible working

espite attractive flexible working policies outweighing the need for increased remuneration, the research - conducted by PayFit - claims that a sizable 83 percent of those surveyed felt improvement was needed to their current workplace’s flexible working policiesA new poll claims that nearly 50 percent of respondents would reject a substantial 15 percent pay increase if it meant forfeiting workplace flexibility, even in a challenging financial climate. Despite attractive flexible working policies outweighing the need for increased remuneration, the research – conducted by PayFit – claims that a sizable 83 percent of those surveyed felt improvement was needed to their current workplace’s flexible policies. More →

Flexible working is delivering the gift of seasonal productivity

Flexible working is delivering the gift of seasonal productivity

business leaders are still keen to maintain productivity with flexible working amidst the seasonal rush while allowing their team to enjoy the holiday periodEmployees have made it clear that they are keen for flexible working arrangements to stay. In fact, according to the Owl Labs 2023 State of Hybrid Work report, 40 percent of employees would decline a job if they were required to be in the office five days a week. With the festive season in full swing, employees will look to utilise the benefits of flexible working as they return home to their families. More →

Two thirds of employees unaware of new flexible working rights

Two thirds of employees unaware of new flexible working rights

Two-thirds of employees are not aware of new flexible working rights that give them a right to request flex work from day one of their jobA new survey from Acas claims that over two-thirds of employees (70 percent) are not aware of new flexible working rights that mean they will have a right to request flexible working from their employer from day one of their job next year. All employees who have worked for their employer for 26 weeks or more currently have the right to ask if they can work flexibly. A new change in the law will make this a right that applies from the first day of employment. More →

New flexible working rights to come into force next year

New flexible working rights to come into force next year

Plans to allow employees to request flexible working from their first day of employment are due to come into force from April 2024Plans to allow employees to request flexible working from their first day of employment are due to come into force from April 2024. Regulations have been laid before Parliament this week removing the requirement for 26 weeks’ service to ask for flexible times and places of work, due to come into effect on 6 April next year. Under the Flexible Working (Amendment) Regulations any requests made from 6 April do not need any service requirement, meaning that employees will be able to make a flexible working request from day one of employment. More →

Half of people would reject a job with no flexible working

Half of people would reject a job with no flexible working

According to a new poll, a lack of flexible working would drive almost half of UK workers to reject a job offerThe latest report outlining how the lack of some or other workplace feature would lead to mass resignations and job rejections arrives from recruitment firm Robert Half. And yes, we do wish PR companies and their clients would knock it off now. If we added up all these polls, nobody would stay in or accept any job. According to the poll, a lack of flexible working would drive almost half of UK workers to reject a job offer. More →