Two thirds of people would trust a robot more than their manager

Two thirds of people would trust a robot more than their manager

People would trust a robot more than their managerFollowing the recent report that people would prefer to be replaced by a robot than a human, a new survey from Oracle suggests they also have more trust in robots than their managers. According to the second annual AI at Work study conducted by Oracle and researchers Future Workplace. The study of 8,370 employees, managers and HR leaders across 10 countries, found that AI has changed the relationship between people and technology at work and is reshaping the role HR teams and managers need to play in attracting, retaining and developing talent. More →

Workers would prefer to lose a job to a robot than a human

Workers would prefer to lose a job to a robot than a human

robot headA new study published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour from academics at the Technical University of Munich and the Rotterdam School of Management claims that most people would prefer to be replaced in their job by a robot rather than another human. The study asked 2,000 workers in Europe and North America to respond to one of two scenarios in which they had to decide on the future of the workforce in an independent organisation or another organisation for which they themselves work which had decided to replace its current workforce completely with either robots or new human staff. More →

Automation now attracts workers to jobs

Automation now attracts workers to jobs

A new report is urging employers to promote their investment in automation and technology when recruiting to avoid missing out on top talent. The What Workers Want 2019 Report (registration), released by Hays, claims that although 70 percent of organisations are investing in automation, nearly a quarter (24 percent) of employers do not currently promote their investment when recruiting. More →

UK organisations falling behind on AI

UK organisations falling behind on AI

Image from Microsoft AI reportUK organisations risk falling behind global competitors unless they act now to accelerate their use of AI technology, according to a new report unveiled today by Microsoft UK. The report claims that organisations currently using AI are now outperforming those that are not by 11.5 percent – a boost that, in the face of unprecedented economic and political uncertainty, UK businesses can ill-afford to pass up, the authors suggest. More →

The role of AI in creating a more human workplace

The role of AI in creating a more human workplace

As artificial intelligence (AI) continues to infiltrate modern society, the benefits and pitfalls the technology receive almost peerless attention. The emergence of AI is of particular importance to how organisations might recruit, with clear signs that they are becoming more interested in the benefits it brings to their businesses.

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Artificial intelligence to drive the next generation of jobs

Artificial intelligence to drive the next generation of jobs

artificial intelligenceThe uptake of artificial intelligence by businesses will transform the UK job market in the near future and will create around 133 million new jobs worldwide. The findings come from a new report called Harnessing the Power of AI: The Demand for Future Skills (registration) from recruiter Robert Walters and market analysts Vacancy Soft. More →

Automation will boost productivity, but risks leaving people behind

Automation will boost productivity, but risks leaving people behind

Automation of an eyeUnless the Government steps up efforts to manage the transition to automation, many people and entire regions of the UK face being left behind and British businesses could find themselves becoming less competitive, says the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) Committee in a report published today.
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Workers prepared to accept automation but need training

Workers prepared to accept automation but need training

Lack of training makes people feel uncertain about automation Research from Gallup suggests that people feel unprepared for the introduction of new technologies, despite being optimistic about their job prospects. The Gallup Real Future of Work report of 4,000 employees has found that people around the world are generally upbeat about the impact of technology and automation on their careers, despite some analysts predicting that AI-enabled machines would take over 50 percent of human jobs within the decade. More →

Automation fear for workers not developing new skills

Automation fear for workers not developing new skills

A confident worker clearly has the right skills to adapt to automationOver half of workers believe automation will significantly change or make their job obsolete within the next ten years and three quarters would learn new skills or completely retrain to improve their future employability. Yet people given fewer opportunities to learn new digital skills are more fearful of the impact of automation, and are more likely to have lower levels of education. More →

AI revolution means 120 million people need to reskill

AI revolution means 120 million people need to reskill

The AI revolution means a large number of people need to reskill soonAs many as 120 million workers in the world’s 12 largest economies may need to be retrained or reskilled over the next three years as a result of the advent of artificial intelligence (AI) and automation, according to a new IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV) study. It also suggests that only 41 percent of CEOs surveyed say that they have the people, skills and resources required to execute their business strategies.

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UK workers ready to embrace automation

UK workers ready to embrace automation

UK workers are optimistic about the opportunities technology will create in the future as over 90 percent believe it is changing their workplace and everyday lives for the better. Professionals in the UK stand ready to embrace automation, as findings from over 14,500 respondents in the Hays What Workers Want 2019 Report (registration) suggest that they are interested in using the latest digital technology both in everyday life (70 percent) and even more so in the workplace (80 percent). More →

Insecure leaders prefer to take advice from machines than people

Insecure leaders prefer to take advice from machines than people

Leaders and machines

Leaders who are in danger of losing their position are more likely to take advice from a data algorithm than another human, research from BI Norwegian Business School claims. Psychologist Ingvild Müller Seljeseth conducted studies where participants were assigned to either stable or unstable leadership positions, which they would lose if they made a wrong decision. When asked to estimate the number of peas in a jar, leaders in a stable position were far more inclined to accept advice from previous participants than leaders in an unstable position. More →

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