Search Results for: career

60 percent of managers believe luck has played a part in career. Up to 40 percent don’t realise it

60 percent of managers believe luck has played a part in career. Up to 40 percent don’t realise it

Around 60 percent of managers believe that an element of luck has played a significant part in shaping their careers, according to new research by emlyon business school. Respondents stated that this luck typically came through a chance event, which could be positive or negative, but either way had a huge impact on their career. More →

Gossiping at work really is bad for your career

Gossiping at work really is bad for your career

Gossiping at work can have serious negative impacts on your career, according to new research by Durham University Business School and NEOMA Business School. Not only are gossipers frowned upon by other work colleagues, they also become socially excluded in the company, and can experience negative career-related impacts as a consequence of their storytelling. More →

New academic research identifies the four emotional stages of your career. Spoiler – it ends in disillusion

New academic research identifies the four emotional stages of your career. Spoiler – it ends in disillusion

The study of UK legal professionals showed they progressed from excitement and anticipation at the start of their career, followed by fear and anxiety as they pursue promotion, to pride and joy at having secured a senior post, and finally experiencing disillusionment and disappointment at the lack of further changeLawyers progress through four distinct emotional stages in their fight to get to the top and secure a coveted partnership role, according to new research from the University of Bath’s School of Management. The study of UK legal professionals showed they progressed from excitement and anticipation at the start of their career, followed by fear and anxiety as they pursue promotion, to pride and joy at having secured a senior post, and finally experiencing disillusionment and disappointment at the lack of further change. More →

People from ‘Gen Z’ expect to change career at least three times during their working lives

People from ‘Gen Z’ expect to change career at least three times during their working lives

While 73 percent of people from 'Gen Z' are willing to take a pay cut to pursue more fulfilling opportunities, two thirds of Gen Zs plan to quit their current job by 2025While 73 percent of people from ‘Gen Z’ are willing to take a pay cut to pursue more fulfilling opportunities, two thirds of them plan to quit their current job by 2025, according to a new poll. Perceptions on careers and how often employees need to reskill and alter their career route has evolved significantly for the newest generation of workers, reveals the national survey of 2,000 working adults by Resource Solutions. The results suggest Gen Zs expect to change industries at least three times throughout their working life – once more than any other generation before them.  More →

Over a quarter of women think menopause has had a negative impact on their career

Over a quarter of women think menopause has had a negative impact on their career

Over a quarter of women (27 percent) aged 40-60 in the UK, who are currently in employment and have experienced menopause symptoms - an estimated 1.2 million - say that menopause has had a negative impact on their career progressionOver a quarter of women (27 percent) aged 40-60 in the UK, who are currently in employment and have experienced menopause symptoms – an estimated 1.2 million – say that menopause has had a negative impact on their career progression, according to new research from the CIPD. In addition, 36 percent of women with a disability or long-term health condition say their symptoms have had a negative impact on their career progression, compared with 24 percent who don’t have one. More →

Four million UK employees have changed careers due to a lack of flexible working options

Four million UK employees have changed careers due to a lack of flexible working options

New research from the CIPD suggests that an estimated 4 million people have changed careers due to a lack of flexible working optionsNew research from the CIPD suggests that an estimated 4 million people have changed careers due to a lack of flexible working options, while an estimated 2 million have left a job in the last year for the same reason. As a result, the CIPD is warning that businesses may face a talent exodus if they fail to offer more flexible choices to people. The CIPD’s latest report, which explores employee and employer perspectives towards flexible and hybrid working practices, highlights that offering them is key to retaining and attracting staff, addressing the current skills shortage and fostering inclusive workplaces. More →

Chance plays a huge role in career success, report confirms

Chance plays a huge role in career success, report confirms

If you've ever thought that the success or otherwise of a career is a little or largely dependent on getting the right breaks at the right time, new research from academics in the UK and France may confirm itIf you’ve ever thought that the success or otherwise of a career is a little or largely dependent on getting the right breaks at the right time, new research from academics in the UK and France may confirm it. The study examines the role of chance events, whether positive or negative, on managers’ career success across Europe. While positive chance events typically have a positive impact on careers, 71 percent of those having experienced a negative chance event report nevertheless a positive impact on their careers. More →

Working mums feel forced to limit careers due to inflexible working practices

Working mums feel forced to limit careers due to inflexible working practices

A new report claims that many working mums have felt forced to limit their careers as a result of their employer’s inflexible and outdated working policies and cultures.A new report claims that many working mums have felt forced to limit their careers as a result of their employer’s inflexible and outdated working policies and cultures. The Shift from Worker to Working Parent sponsored by WOMBA (Work, Me and the Baby) and carried out by Hult International Business School (Ashridge) interviewed working mums and dads who had recently taken extended parental leave about the experiences they faced as they transitioned to parenthood in an organisational context. More →

Imposter syndrome stands in the way of people aiming for a ‘portfolio career’

Imposter syndrome stands in the way of people aiming for a ‘portfolio career’

A man holding a mask away from his face to show how imposter syndrome is holding back people wanting portfolio careers.A new report from the UK’s Department for Education claims that over half of adults in England (52 percent) would consider developing a portfolio career if they had more confidence in their own abilities. The figure rises to 71 percent for those working in HR, and 45 percent of workers would do so if they suffered less from so-called imposter syndrome. The research comes as the Department for Education launched a new campaign earlier this year calling for skilled workers to pass on their valuable experience by teaching in further education (FE). The campaign promotes the flexibility of teaching part-time in FE, enabling industry professionals to ‘change lives without changing careers’ by passing on their work-based skills and knowledge to the next generation of learners in their field alongside their current job. More →

Younger workers turn to friends rather than colleagues for career advice

Younger workers turn to friends rather than colleagues for career advice

A painting of two people sharing a drink and some career adviceA new poll from Right Management, claims that British office workers aged 18-24 years are much more likely to turn to friends in similar jobs for career advice, than to seek guidance from their immediate manager or any other colleagues (older or younger) in their team. After two years of remote and hybrid working impacting on office life, younger workers who need career guidance are more likely (38.1 percent) to turn to their friends in similar jobs for advice, whereas all other working age groups (those aged 25+) prioritise getting their career advice directly from their immediate manager. More →

Growing number of people regret career moves, claims Gartner research

Growing number of people regret career moves, claims Gartner research

career movesNearly 60 percent of candidates who recently made career moves report that they would still make the same choice, according to a poll from Gartner. The survey of more than 1,800 candidates conducted in June 2022 claims that candidates who reported they would repeat an offer decision reached a peak of 83 percent in 2021, after increasing steadily in 2019 (60 percent) and 2020 (70 percent), before decreasing dramatically this year. The same survey suggests that nearly half of surveyed candidates say they are still open to other offers, while 28 percent say if they had to make the decision again, they would stay at their previous employer. More →

Generational careers divide opens up in wake of pandemic

Generational careers divide opens up in wake of pandemic

careers divideAlmost half of UK employees aged between 18 and 24 think that COVID-19 has decreased the importance placed on their careers, compared to 35 percent of 55-64 year-olds. And more than half think the pandemic has negatively impacted their career progression, compared to just 35 percent of 35-44 year olds and 17 percent of 54-65 year olds. Those are the key findings of a poll presented in a report from Employment Hero, shows that COVID-19 has caused a widening generational divide in the career motivation and wellbeing of UK employees. More →