Search Results for: engineering

HDR is providing engineering expertise on one of London’s most sustainable, all-electric office buildings

HDR is providing engineering expertise on one of London’s most sustainable, all-electric office buildings

Holbein Gardens, located at 7 Holbein Place in the heart of London’s Belgravia, will lead the way for future schemes on the road to achieving net zero carbon. Independent multidisciplinary engineering consultancy HDR has been commissioned by property business Grosvenor Britain & Ireland to provide engineering services on Holbein Gardens, a new office scheme located in the heart of Belgravia. More →

CIBSE updates guide to engineering maintenance and management of buildings

Engineering design of buildingsUpdated guidance for designers, maintainers, facilities managers and building owners on the operation and maintenance of engineering services has been issued by CIBSE. Guide M: Maintenance Engineering and Management supersedes the first edition published in 2008 to provide best practice for those who have responsibility for the management and maintenance of the engineering services in a building. It is written for anyone involved in the design and construction of buildings to raise awareness of the implications their decisions have on management and maintenance. The main areas of revision relate to legislation changes and changes in best practice. The guidance continues the work of the CIBSE Maintenance Task Group chaired by Joanna Harris, and intends to close the gap between design and operation by bringing maintenance into a sharper focus and helping building and property operators become more aware of their responsibilities and duties. The ultimate aim is to help clients by managing their expectations and maximising impact from their annual spends on maintenance and management of buildings.

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Interview: Greg Lindsay on engineering serendipity and harnessing chaos

Render of Plaza at Zappos offices in LA

Render of Plaza at Zappos offices in LA

Greg Lindsay is a journalist and urbanist. He is a contributing writer for Fast Company and co-author of the international bestseller Aerotropolis: The Way We’ll Live Next as well as a visiting scholar at New York University’s Rudin Center for Transportation Policy & Management, a senior fellow of the World Policy Institute, and a research affiliate of the New England Complex Systems Institute. He is also one of the main speakers at this year’s Worktech conference in London on 19 and 20 November. In this frank and enlightening interview he offers his thoughts on how firms can engineer serendipity into their workplaces and cultures and how the way we design offices is already taking clues from the way we plan urban environments.

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Smart technology needs to start with people if it wants to get smarter

Smart technology needs to start with people if it wants to get smarter

A wood carving of a blank, slumped person sitting at a desk with a laptop to depict the dehumanization potential of smart technology“My engineering students had come to class with technology on their minds.” So says artist and design researcher Sara Hendren, author of What a Body Can Do: How we Meet the Built World. It’s a fascinating book in which she consciously pushes back against the prevailing narrative that so-called smart technology has a fix for every problem. As a professor teaching design for disability at Olin College of Engineering, Massachusetts, Hendren draws attention to the assumptions that drive normative behaviours to define what is a ‘problem’ in the first place. More →

How routines and boredom can spark creativity

How routines and boredom can spark creativity

Every day, after a leisurely breakfast in bed and the opening of his post, Roald Dahl would wander down his garden to the grubby little hut crammed with personal paraphernalia he had created. There he would sharpen the six yellow pencils that were always by his side while he worked, settle into an armchair, put his feet up on an old suitcase filled with logs, place an American yellow legal pad of paper onto a makeshift board on his lap and work for two hours. More →

Imposter syndrome stands in the way of people aiming for a ‘portfolio career’

Imposter syndrome stands in the way of people aiming for a ‘portfolio career’

A man holding a mask away from his face to show how imposter syndrome is holding back people wanting portfolio careers.A new report from the UK’s Department for Education claims that over half of adults in England (52 percent) would consider developing a portfolio career if they had more confidence in their own abilities. The figure rises to 71 percent for those working in HR, and 45 percent of workers would do so if they suffered less from so-called imposter syndrome. The research comes as the Department for Education launched a new campaign earlier this year calling for skilled workers to pass on their valuable experience by teaching in further education (FE). The campaign promotes the flexibility of teaching part-time in FE, enabling industry professionals to ‘change lives without changing careers’ by passing on their work-based skills and knowledge to the next generation of learners in their field alongside their current job. More →

Zero carbon tech for building materials gets $12 billion commitment at COP27

Zero carbon tech for building materials gets $12 billion commitment at COP27

An aluminium clad building facade to illustrate the importance of zero carbon tech in buildingsThe World Economic Forum and US Special Presidential Envoy for Climate announced today at COP27, the expansion of a coalition of global companies, to commit $12 billion in 2030 purchase commitments for zero carbon and green technologies to decarbonise the cement and concrete industry and other hard-to-abate sectors. The latest expansion of the First Movers Coalition – made up of 65 companies with a collective market value of approximately $8 trillion – focuses on cleaning up one of the world’s most carbon-intensive industry sectors through purchasing commitments for low-carbon technology. From construction and engineering to real estate and developers, newly announced First Mover companies have committed to purchasing at least 10 percent near-zero cement and concrete per year by 2030.  More →

Gallery: British Council for Offices announces winners of national awards

Gallery: British Council for Offices announces winners of national awards

Sunderland City Hall was celebrated as ‘Best of the Best’ at the British Council for Offices’ (BCO) National Awards at the Grosvenor House hotel in London last night, also taking home the ‘Corporate Workplace’ award. The office was joined by six other award winners recognised as leading examples of excellence in office space across the UK. The BCO’s National Awards programme claims to recognises top quality office design and functionality and says it sets the standard for excellence across the office sector. More →

World Architecture Festival announces Special Prize shortlist

World Architecture Festival announces Special Prize shortlist

World Architecture FestivalThe World Architecture Festival (WAF) has announced the 2022 Special Prize shortlist, ahead of this year’s festival which takes place in Lisbon from 30 November – 2 December. The projects shortlisted for the Special Prizes are selected from across the greater WAF Awards shortlist to shine a light on the submissions that exhibit an outstanding use of Engineering, Colour, Natural Light and Certified Timber, as well as the best Small Project of the Year Prize. This year sees two inaugural new prizes, The Futureglass Prize supported by Aestech and The Royal Fine Art Commission Trust International Building Beauty Prize supported by Ballymore. More →

Data centre design is entering a new era

Data centre design is entering a new era

data centre designA new exhibition has shone a light on the often overlooked building typology of the data centre. The show, entitled Power House running to 28 February and curated by design journalist Clare Dowdy looks at the architecture of data centres, showcasing proposals and existing designs by architecture practices around the globe, from vast complexes in remote locations, to retrofitted buildings in urban centres. More →

UK is third most attractive place to work in Europe

UK is third most attractive place to work in Europe

most attractive place to workThe UK is the third most attractive place to work in Europe and experienced a stronger “brain-gain” than other major economies, according to a report from job site Indeed. It analysed nearly one billion data points including more than 800 million cross-border job searches and over 100 million job postings and found that cross-border searches by European jobseekers are up 13 percent from their pandemic low of -32 percent.   At the same time, Europe has become increasingly popular to jobseekers outside of the continent: inbound searches from jobseekers based outside Europe are a staggering 38 percent above the 2017-19 average, up from the pandemic low of -31 percent. More →

To provide people with better indoor air quality, we need a major upgrade of buildings

To provide people with better indoor air quality, we need a major upgrade of buildings

indoor air qualityGovernment must seize the post-pandemic opportunity to mandate long-term improvements to infection control in commercial, public and residential buildings to improve indoor air quality, reduce the transmission of future waves of COVID-19, new pandemics, seasonal influenza and other infectious diseases, according to a report published by the National Engineering Policy Centre (NEPC). Infection control must also be coordinated with efforts to improve energy efficiency and fire safety, to support the three goals of safe, healthy and sustainable buildings. More →

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