About Neil Franklin

Neil Franklin is Insight's news editor

Posts by Neil Franklin:

US sees biggest jump in working from home since 2008, claims study

US sees biggest jump in working from home since 2008, claims study 0

Share Button

working from homeAccording to an analysis of the just-released 2014 American Community Survey (ACS) conducted by GlobalWorkplaceAnalytics.com, approximately 3.7 million US employees (2.5 percent of the workforce) called home their primary place of work in 2014. This represents a 6.5 percent increase and the largest year over year growth in the number of people working from home since before the recession. The ACS data is based on a nationwide survey of answers to the question “What was your primary means of travel to work during the survey week—’Worked at Home’ is one of the choices. The count only includes those who work at home at least half of the time. According to Global Workplace Analytics far more people work at home on a less frequent basis and many work in “third places” such as coffee shops, co-working facilities, libraries, and just about anywhere there’s an internet connection.

More →

Sales of tablets will go into reverse next year, claims new report

Sales of tablets will go into reverse next year, claims new report 0

Share Button

TabletsA new study from US based technology research organisation ABI Research claims that sales of tablets as well as their worldwide user base will start to shrink next year for the first time. According to the study, the global installed base of tablets will recede as shipments of large slate devices continue their decline as users switch their preference to larger smartphones. While sales of tablets enjoyed consistent growth between 2010 and 2014, the report claims that buyers are looking to replace this generation of products and are discovering that they can enjoy much of the same functionality thanks to the growth in popularity of smartphones with larger screens and a broader range of software and apps. Small businesses, meanwhile, are increasingly attracted to hybrid laptops as a replacement for tablets. According to the study, usage of tablets worldwide will peak at the end of this year.

More →

Human error remains the leading cause of data loss for UK organisations

Human error remains the leading cause of data loss for UK organisations 0

Share Button

human-errorNew research suggests that human error is still the leading cause of data loss for UK organisations. According to the study from technology security firm Databarracks, based on responses from 400 IT decision makers, around a quarter (24 percent) of organisations admitted to a data loss caused by a mistake by employees over the last twelve months. Other high-scoring causes of data loss included hardware failure (21 percent) and data corruption (19 percent). Perhaps surprisingly, only a little over half of respondents (55 percent) had a specific disaster recovery plan in place and another 15 percent intended to create one over the next twelve months.  This is in spite of the fact that a quarter (25 percent) of those surveyed admitted they had been subject to a cyber attack in the preceding year. As we reported this week, such attacks now cost the UK some £200 billion each year.

More →

More people are working from home, but they can end up feeling lonely

More people are working from home, but they can end up feeling lonely 0

Share Button

RoneryMore and more British workers are working remotely, from home and other locations, but they are growing increasingly disconnected from their colleagues. Those are the findings of two studies into new ways of working conducted independently by Plantronics and Regus. According to the Plantronics survey of 2,500 staff, flexible working was given another boost over this Summer in response to the (intermittent) good weather and industrial action by London public transport staff. During August, more than half (55 percent) of the workforce chose to work from home or remotely more convenient to them, the audio communications firm’s study found. On the flipside,  the survey of 4,000 workers by serviced office provider Regus claims that almost two-thirds of employees who work from home miss mixing with colleagues and can feel lonely as a result.

More →

Colleagues more likely than managers to make people feel engaged at work

Colleagues more likely than managers to make people feel engaged at work 0

Share Button

Engagament

A new report from Oracle claims that the people most likely to make employees feel engaged at work are their peers rather than their managers. The study, Simply Talent, also suggests that employees think their employer’s HR function is least likely to have a positive impact on their engagement levels. The study, which sets out to understand the drivers and benefits of employee engagement in Europe, polled 1,511 employees at large European businesses. The survey claims that 42 percent of employees across Europe believe that their peers have the most positive impact on how engaged they feel at work, well ahead of line managers (21 percent) and business unit managers (7 percent) and HR (3 percent) Conversely, when it comes to negatively affecting engagement, employees believe the senior leadership team (19 percent) and line managers (11 percent) are the most responsible.

More →

BSI revises design and construction standard for facilities managers

BSI revises design and construction standard for facilities managers 0

Share Button

BIMBSI, the UK based organisation responsible for developing and publishing standards for businesses, has revised BS 8536-1 Briefing for design and construction: Code of practice for facilities management (Buildings infrastructure). The standard has been included in the Level 2 BIM package which the Government expects companies to offer when tendering for Government contracts. The standard has now been brought into line with the principles of the Soft Landings Framework and Government Soft Landings (GSL) post occupancy evaluation and BIM requirement. Soft landings is designed to enable the transition from design and construction into operation. It advocates collaboration during briefing, design, construction and handover between the design and construction team and the operator, operations team or facilities manager.

More →

Neocon highlights four of the world’s most important office design trends

Neocon highlights four of the world’s most important office design trends

Share Button

humanscale-office-iq-float-smartWe live in the Global Village, Marshall McLuhan’s idea from 1962 of an electronically contracted world in which attitudes, cultures and our political, business and legislative framework begin to pull together. Yet each nation is shaped by little differences. That is why the comedy programme The Office found an audience on both sides of the pond, but one that needed Wernham Hogg in Slough to become Dunder Mifflin in Scranton, Pennsylvania for it to work for the local audience. The central idea of the show has a universal appeal but needs a local voice. And what is true for The Office with a big O is also true for the office with a small o. This was the takeaway conclusion of a series of events staged in London and Manchester last week by Milliken and Humanscale. The touchstone for these events was a debate about the main conclusions of of June’s Neocon.

More →

Forget flexible working, what most workers would prefer is more money

Forget flexible working, what most workers would prefer is more money

Share Button

donkey-and-carrotFlexible working, wellbeing and praise may grab all the headlines when it comes to ways of raising productivity but if you really want to get more out of staff, the  number one motivator remains the one that hits them where it really matters – in their pockets. According to a study of the attitudes of 1,000 office workers from office space search engine Office Genie, around half (49 percent) chose pay rises and more than a third (36 percent) chose other financial  incentives when asked to select the top three ways their employers could improve their productivity. Nine percent specifically mention company shares. The third most popular measure overall was flexible working, cited by 22 percent of workers in their top three, followed by praising good work (20 percent) and encouraging people to get a good night’s sleep, again listed by a fifth of staff.

More →

Occupiers give big thumbs down to service levels from property sector

Occupiers give big thumbs down to service levels from property sector

Share Button

facebook-thumbs-downThe property sector offers its customers pretty appalling customer service, according to a ‘damning’ new report from the British Council of Offices (BCO).  The study, based on the experiences of just 64 occupiers claims that fewer than one in five (17 percent) rate their property management service as “good” or “excellent” and fewer than one in three feeling that their suppliers understood their business needs. The survey found that although customer service is lacking, satisfaction with the end product itself was high, with two out of three occupiers happy with the quality of their office and three out of four perceiving quality to have improved over the past 10 years. The report sets out a 10-point action plan to improve the service occupiers receive, including adopting a new definition of “building performance” set by the BCO and encouraging more transparency.

More →

Growing numbers of workers are ditching their laptops, claims study

Growing numbers of workers are ditching their laptops, claims study

Share Button

Laptop-binA growing number of European employees are shedding their laptops and instead using tablets as their sole device for work, according to a new study from technology research firm International Data Corporation. The report surveyed 2,000 UK, French and German workers and found that tablets are the only business device used by 40 percent of staff. Not everybody is ditching their keyboard so readily, however, as more and more people are using hybrids as their sole device because they need the functionality of the keyboard. The study found that just under a third of users rely solely on hybrids and the study expects this to rise to over half within a couple of years. This not only reflects the changing way we work but also has profound implications for the way we design and manage the places we work and the tools and systems we use to communicate with each other.

More →

Translate >>