Competitive sport is a game changer in the workplace

Competitive sport is a game changer in the workplace

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A new report by The Institute of Leadership & Management called Leaders at Play claims that participating in competitive sport gives people an advantage in their working lives, which in turn gives men an advantage because many more have competed in sports. The report also claims that people are often aware of the link because three quarters of workers who play competitive sport believe it gives them skills and capabilities that provide them with a workplace advantage. More →

Young people struggle to find secure and meaningful work

Young people struggle to find secure and meaningful work

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young people struggle to find meaningful workThe Institute for Employment Studies (IES) has published new research exploring young people’s experiences of work and the implications for their future health. Many of the issues raised are common across all age groups, but the report argues that they can be especially pronounced and harmful for younger people as they set about finding meaningful work that is also secure and well paid.

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Women still face broken rungs on the career ladder

Women still face broken rungs on the career ladder

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More women than ever before occupy senior executive positions, but true gender parity hasn’t yet been reached and women continue to face unique challenges in their careers according to the latest Women in the Workplace Report from LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Company. This year’s study—which is based on data and insights from 329 companies employing over 13 million people and more than 68,500 employees—identifies a key point on the corporate ladder where women lose the most ground: the first step up to manager. If companies fixed this broken rung, it could add one million more women to management in corporate America over the next 5 years. More →

Two thirds of people think they could work just as well without supervision

Two thirds of people think they could work just as well without supervision

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A new study from Kimble Applications claims that workers are predisposed to be happiest at agile organisations and would appreciate managers who speak less and listen more. According to the report, Britain’s employees are fed up with overbearing bosses, hungry to participate more at work and wished they had more of a two-way dialogue with their superiors, new research has found. The survey also claims that more than two-thirds of British workers (69 per cent) feel they could do their job just as well or even better without their manager’s input. More →

Caring responsibilities mean 1 in 5 mid-life people quit jobs

Caring responsibilities mean 1 in 5 mid-life people quit jobs

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Supercarers offer a range of caring servicesOver 2.6 million employees aged 45 and over expect that they will have to leave their jobs in order to care for a relative or partner, according to new research from Aviva. This equates to one in five (19 percent) employees in this age group. Many mid-life employees are opting to take on their relatives’ caring duties themselves as a means of minimising care bills, but this decision is coming at the expense of their career. More →

The art of arranging the world so we do not have to experience it

The art of arranging the world so we do not have to experience it

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If you’re a man, each morning as you leave the house you probably perform the bleary-eyed pocket patting ritual that, after a shower, shave and a cup of tea is your sole reassurance that you are in any way prepared for the day ahead. The thinking is that if you’re clean, caffeinated, your flies are up and you’ve got your keys, wallet and phone, you can take pretty much anything the world can throw at you. More →

Automation now attracts workers to jobs

Automation now attracts workers to jobs

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A new report is urging employers to promote their investment in automation and technology when recruiting to avoid missing out on top talent. The What Workers Want 2019 Report (registration), released by Hays, claims that although 70 percent of organisations are investing in automation, nearly a quarter (24 percent) of employers do not currently promote their investment when recruiting. More →

Workplace perks peak as workers see them mainly as gimmicks

Workplace perks peak as workers see them mainly as gimmicks

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workplace perks peakNew research from travel app provider Seatfrog claims that workers are looking for more than just fun or unusual workplace perks to brag about to their friends when starting a job. While on-site table tennis, a free bar and unlimited snacks has become commonplace in the war to attract talent, especially in the technology sector, around three in five of the 2,000 people surveyed dismiss perks as nothing short of a gimmick.  More →

Tech skills now more important than maths and science say business leaders

Tech skills now more important than maths and science say business leaders

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More than two-thirds (68 percent) of British businesses think that acquiring tech skills such as coding trumps the importance of more classic subjects such as maths and science. The research, from tech job board CWJobs, also claims that 71 percent of businesses urge candidates to learn tech specialisms in order to futureproof their careers. Active jobseekers should take note of skills that can push them to the top of the hiring list, with eight out of 10 (80 percent) business leaders revealing candidates having a tech specialism is an important factor in their future hiring decisions across any job sector. More →

Firms turn to temp staff to acquire digital skills

Firms turn to temp staff to acquire digital skills

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As well as using contingent staff to help them become more agile, research from recruitment consultancy Robert Half UK claims that over three quarters (76 percent) of employers are turning to the temporary market to aid their digital transformation efforts. More →

Firms shift to contingent work to stay agile, report claims

Firms shift to contingent work to stay agile, report claims

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contingent workAround a quarter of firms worldwide and mid-sized companies are shifting permanent roles to contingent work positions this year to remain agile, according to a report from Randstad Sourceright. The quarterly Talent Trends study (registration), based on responses from executives, HR managers and other professionals across 17 markets worldwide, claims that businesses are using gig and freelance workers to fill formerly permanent positions. More →

Skills gap driven by changing structure of labour market

Skills gap driven by changing structure of labour market

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skills gapRecent years have seen a widespread drop in global unemployment rates but what continues to puzzle economists has been the subsequent failure of wage inflation to follow suit. This has created an unusual phenomenon of wage stagnation across global markets, according to the eighth edition of the Hays Global Skills Index, a report into skills and the skills gap published by recruitment firm Hays in collaboration with Oxford Economics. More →

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