Search Results for: education

Mental health issues in young fathers caused by a lack of support in work and educational settings

Mental health issues in young fathers caused by a lack of support in work and educational settings

young fathersNew research published by Leeds Trinity University and parenting platform DaddiLife claims that young fathers face preventable barriers when accessing education and employment, leaving some in vulnerable positions with an increased risk of facing mental health issues. More →

Graduates feel their education leaves them wholly unprepared for work

Graduates feel their education leaves them wholly unprepared for work

graduates setting outMany of this year’s graduates finished their degrees online and are due to enter the workplace amidst a tumultuous jobs market, however, fewer graduates felt like their university had prepared them for the workplace this year, with only 15 percent reporting that they felt completely prepared (down from 18 percent last year). Graduate jobs board Milkround’s survey of nearly 3,000 students, graduates and young workers has revealed that 10 percent of the next generation of workers feel wholly unprepared for the workplace after their degree. More →

Choices and expectations perpetuate higher education gap and gender pay gap, UCL research finds

Choices and expectations perpetuate higher education gap and gender pay gap, UCL research finds

Teenagers’ own career aspirations could be perpetuating both the gender pay gap and the higher education gap, a study from researchers at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) suggests. The new research reveals that, while teenage girls are more likely than teenage boys to have high hopes of going to university and having a professional or managerial occupation, when it comes to salaries it’s the boys who are aiming highest. The research team at the IOE’s Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), analysed data collected from over 7,700 teenagers in the UK who are all part of the Millennium Cohort Study, a study which has followed their lives since they were born at the turn of the century. When they were 14, the teenagers were asked a series of questions to find out their future aspirations.

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World education programme aims to help 34,000 young people worldwide

World education programme aims to help 34,000 young people worldwide 0

Global trade enabler DP World is rolling out its Global Education Programme internationally following an English language pilot in seven countries with an aim to deliver over 100 sessions in seven additional languages by the end of 2016. Volunteers from 17 DP World locations in the UAE, India, Pakistan, Senegal, the UK, Argentina and the Philippines delivering the programme have received positive feedback from students and teachers. Over 90% of teachers in the pilot countries said that the course provided their pupils with something new their school could not have provided and 85% said they would be likely to recommend DP World as an employer to pupils. The Global Education Programme aims to engage 34,000 children between the ages of 8-14 by 2020 with DP World volunteers delivering it from across its network of 77 operating marine and inland terminals in 40 countries.

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Job dissatisfaction is rife among senior executives – and hybrid working doesn’t help

Job dissatisfaction is rife among senior executives – and hybrid working doesn’t help

job dissatisfactionWidespread job dissatisfaction means a large proportion of senior executives from top US companies plan to leave their organisations in the next two years, according to a new report from KellyOCG. According to the 2022 KellyOCG Global Workforce Report – Re:work – there’s a significant disconnect between employees’ expectations and the support employers provide. Through a survey of C-suite leaders, board members, department heads, directors, and managers in 12 countries, including the United States and Canada, the report claims that 78 percent of US executives and 52 percent of Canadian executives, compared to 72 percent of leaders globally, aim to leave their jobs by 2024. More →

Women working from home more likely than men to say their careers are harmed

Women working from home more likely than men to say their careers are harmed

working from homeWomen working from home regularly are less positive about their career prospects than men are, new research suggests. They are also less optimistic about getting recognition for good work and being included in important consultations when compared to men who often work from home, the study found. The research, presented at the British Sociological Association’s online annual conference today [Wednesday, 20 April 2022], comes at a time when employers and staff are deciding how much they will work from home as pandemic restrictions are removed.

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The colour of magic in office design

The colour of magic in office design

In the Discworld series of novels, the author Terry Pratchett introduces us to the colour of magic. He calls it octarine, a sort of greenish purple, described as ‘the undisputed pigment of the imagination’. It’s all fanciful but, in fact, such unseeable colours exist for the human eye. They are seemingly invisible to us most of the time because of the limitations of our vision and not just because they exist outside of the usual visible spectrum. More →

The lumpy, bumpy uncertainty of the future of work

The lumpy, bumpy uncertainty of the future of work

future of workIt’s now two years since we experienced the first true, sharp jolt of the pandemic. And even if we had now fully escaped its grip, the intervening 24 months would have proved transformational. The clichés, groupthink and glib takes may still shape much of the discourse about the ‘future of work’ but many of the instant experts of the Spring and Summer of 2020 now appear to have moved their insight on to other matters. And that leaves the rest of us with the task of working out what is actually going on. More →

The rise of DBS checks in the modern workplace

The rise of DBS checks in the modern workplace

DBS checksDisclosure and Barring Service (DBS) checks are becoming an increasingly common requirement. More and more industries are realising their utility, for important functions such as increasing the safety of the workplace, and protecting the broader interests of the brand. In this article, we take a closer look at some of the causes behind the rise of DBS checks, to help employers and employees alike better understand their importance. More specifically, we outline the importance of such checks in a modern work environment, and their place in a society which is ever-conscious about the role of privacy. Let’s explore further.  More →

Despite the talk of the Great Resignation, most people actually enjoy their jobs

Despite the talk of the Great Resignation, most people actually enjoy their jobs

great resignation happyWhile many people may be busy considering their career options as part of the ‘Great Resignation’, a new poll claims that the majority of Brits actually enjoy their jobs. According to data from HR software provider CIPHR around two-thirds (65 percent) of the 1,031 employees polled said they either love or like their current jobs (19 percent and 46 percent respectively). CIPHR took the findings of how people feel about their jobs and grouped people with related job titles together (using the Office for National Statistics’ standard occupational classifications) to compile a list of the UK’s best-loved – and also least-liked – occupations: www.ciphr.com/uks-favourite-jobs. More →

Employment opportunities denied to people from low socioeconomic backgrounds

Employment opportunities denied to people from low socioeconomic backgrounds

employment opportunitiesOver 50 percent of UK job seekers from low socioeconomic backgrounds miss out on employment opportunities, claims a study of over 2,200 people. The survey (registration), from EdTec startup Forage suggests that employers must refine their social mobility initiatives to achieve a fair recruitment process for all. More →

Not busy-ness as usual: how boredom may be one of the keys to creativity

Not busy-ness as usual: how boredom may be one of the keys to creativity

boredom and creativityThe modern world seems geared to help us avoid boredom. But there’s a problem. Artists have long recognised that boredom can drive creativity. The great Italian writer-philosopher Giacomo Leopardi described boredom as “the most sublime of all human emotions because it expresses the fact that the human spirit, in a certain sense, is greater than the entire universe. Boredom is an expression of a profound despair at not finding anything that can satisfy the soul’s boundless needs.” More →

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