About Neil Franklin

Neil Franklin is Insight's news editor

Posts by Neil Franklin:

Neocon highlights four of the world’s most important office design trends

Neocon highlights four of the world’s most important office design trends

humanscale-office-iq-float-smartWe live in the Global Village, Marshall McLuhan’s idea from 1962 of an electronically contracted world in which attitudes, cultures and our political, business and legislative framework begin to pull together. Yet each nation is shaped by little differences. That is why the comedy programme The Office found an audience on both sides of the pond, but one that needed Wernham Hogg in Slough to become Dunder Mifflin in Scranton, Pennsylvania for it to work for the local audience. The central idea of the show has a universal appeal but needs a local voice. And what is true for The Office with a big O is also true for the office with a small o. This was the takeaway conclusion of a series of events staged in London and Manchester last week by Milliken and Humanscale. The touchstone for these events was a debate about the main conclusions of of June’s Neocon.

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Forget flexible working, what most workers would prefer is more money

Forget flexible working, what most workers would prefer is more money

donkey-and-carrotFlexible working, wellbeing and praise may grab all the headlines when it comes to ways of raising productivity but if you really want to get more out of staff, the  number one motivator remains the one that hits them where it really matters – in their pockets. According to a study of the attitudes of 1,000 office workers from office space search engine Office Genie, around half (49 percent) chose pay rises and more than a third (36 percent) chose other financial  incentives when asked to select the top three ways their employers could improve their productivity. Nine percent specifically mention company shares. The third most popular measure overall was flexible working, cited by 22 percent of workers in their top three, followed by praising good work (20 percent) and encouraging people to get a good night’s sleep, again listed by a fifth of staff.

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Occupiers give big thumbs down to service levels from property sector

Occupiers give big thumbs down to service levels from property sector

facebook-thumbs-downThe property sector offers its customers pretty appalling customer service, according to a ‘damning’ new report from the British Council of Offices (BCO).  The study, based on the experiences of just 64 occupiers claims that fewer than one in five (17 percent) rate their property management service as “good” or “excellent” and fewer than one in three feeling that their suppliers understood their business needs. The survey found that although customer service is lacking, satisfaction with the end product itself was high, with two out of three occupiers happy with the quality of their office and three out of four perceiving quality to have improved over the past 10 years. The report sets out a 10-point action plan to improve the service occupiers receive, including adopting a new definition of “building performance” set by the BCO and encouraging more transparency.

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Growing numbers of workers are ditching their laptops, claims study

Growing numbers of workers are ditching their laptops, claims study

Laptop-binA growing number of European employees are shedding their laptops and instead using tablets as their sole device for work, according to a new study from technology research firm International Data Corporation. The report surveyed 2,000 UK, French and German workers and found that tablets are the only business device used by 40 percent of staff. Not everybody is ditching their keyboard so readily, however, as more and more people are using hybrids as their sole device because they need the functionality of the keyboard. The study found that just under a third of users rely solely on hybrids and the study expects this to rise to over half within a couple of years. This not only reflects the changing way we work but also has profound implications for the way we design and manage the places we work and the tools and systems we use to communicate with each other.

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