Seven workplace stories that have been on our radar this week

Seven workplace stories that have been on our radar this week

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How we can win the AI race

The great tech paradox for flexible workspaces

The number one office perk? Natural light

The personality test that conned the world

The insecure nature of work is a result of decisions by corporations and policymakers

Landlords up their game to help occupiers attract staff (paywall)

An architect’s defense of open plan offices

A round up of some of the best recent workplace content from around the web

A round up of some of the best recent workplace content from around the web

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All the workstyles we have ever loved

Open plan v private offices déjà vu

Britain’s productivity crisis in eight charts

Investors discount office buildings with high WeWork occupancies

Perceptions of pay fairness

Agile humans, and therefore organisations. Just a dream?

Excessive hours and intense work is (sic) bad for your career

Nine workplace stories that have challenged and informed us in the last week

Nine workplace stories that have challenged and informed us in the last week

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How blue light from screens literally blinds us

Physical closeness makes people and things more desirable

Non-monetary incentives and the implications of work as a source of meaning

How clean is your desk? The unwelcome reality of office hygiene

The utter uselessness of the Cat A habit

UK can thrive post-Brexit, but only with design

New Zealand firm’s four-day week an unmitigated success

Real Estate and technological denial

Biophilic design for the workplace is so much more than plants

Image: Hunt of the Unicorn (tapestry circa 1500) housed at Stirling Castle

A round-up of seven of the best workplace stories from around the web

A round-up of seven of the best workplace stories from around the web

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toasty workA sizeable majority of us are in jobs that don’t fit our occupational interests

Does workplace design really matter?

The most productive meetings have fewer than eight people

Stories from experts about the impact of digital life

Workplace interventions for reducing sitting at work

The AI revolution will be led by toasters, not droids

If you’re going open-plan for costs, you’re doing it wrong

When it comes to change management, culture sometimes eats strategy for breakfast

When it comes to change management, culture sometimes eats strategy for breakfast

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21st Century organisations are under constant pressure to evolve. They are beset by a number of forces that demand they change constantly. These include the need to restructure the organisation, adapt to new technologies, respond to competitors and changes in the economy and legislative environment. Inevitably, this constant need to change affects both people and the built environment in very profound ways. However, according to a study of Culture and Change Management published by the Katzenbach Center, only around half of all transformation initiatives meet their objects over time. Among the biggest obstacles to successful change management cited by the study is change fatigue, which is characterised by a lack of empathy and a widespread failure to engage with the change process.

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Seven stories you may have missed that will get your week off to a flyer

Seven stories you may have missed that will get your week off to a flyer

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A bunch of coworking startups saying the same things about how different they are

The agile workspace is pants

Mass incompetency in business: the way we promote people is dead wrong

Want to discover (or re-discover) your sense of purpose at work?

Is stress at work always a bad thing?

Augmented space planning: Using procedural generation to automate desk layouts

A Stanford researcher says we shouldn’t start working full time until age 40

 

White paper: How the workplace is pioneering the use of data in organisations

White paper: How the workplace is pioneering the use of data in organisations

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In 2017, a content creator called Oobah Butler decided that he wanted to do something with the experience he’d gained writing fake positive restaurant reviews on TripAdvisor. What if, he wondered, he set up an entirely fictitious restaurant based in the shed in his garden and then started to manipulate TripAdvisor ratings?  What happened surpassed his wildest expectations. In just six months, The Shed at Dulwich became the top-rated restaurant in London, even though nobody had ever actually eaten there, based solely on fake reviews, fake pictures and the word of mouth created by a complete inability for anybody to book a table.

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Why you should definitely stand in meetings (and not care what others think about it)

Why you should definitely stand in meetings (and not care what others think about it)

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People who stand in meetings may enjoy a number of health benefits, but it can also make them feel self-conscious, anxious about how others perceive them, and disengaged from the meeting. These findings, taken from our recent study, suggest that efforts to encourage office workers to sit less and move more must acknowledge the realities of the workplace that conspire to keep people chained to their seats. Sitting has been linked to adverse health outcomes, including increased risk of obesity, heart disease, some cancers, and poorer mental health. While some evidence suggests that the harms of sitting can be offset by at least one daily hour of moderate physical activity, this seems an unrealistic target. More →

The week in workplace; six stories and one song that made us think

The week in workplace; six stories and one song that made us think

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The performance management needs of the changing workplace

The UK’s productivity problem: hub no spokes

Simple self-driving shuttles become first robot rides in Detroit

Automation rarely outright destroys jobs; it instead augments

People who think their opinions are better also overestimate their knowledge

Shut down business schools? Two professors debate

The Dunning Kruger Song from the Incompetence Opera

Ten demonstrable truths about the workplace you may not know

Ten demonstrable truths about the workplace you may not know

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workplace designThe science of the workplace has gained a lot of interest over the last few years, highlighting recurring patterns of human behaviour as well as how organisational behaviour relates to office design. In theory, knowledge from this growing body of research could be used to inform design. In practice, this is rarely the case. A survey of 420 architects and designers highlighted a large gap between research and practice: while 80 percent of respondents agreed that more evidence was needed on the impact of design, 68 percent admitted they never reviewed literature and 71 percent said they never engaged in any sort of post-occupancy evaluation. Only 5 percent undertake a formal POE and just 1 percent do so in a rigorous fashion. Not a single practitioner reported a report on the occupied scheme, despite its importance in understanding the impact of a design.

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The future of the workplace emerges from the mists at Neocon

The future of the workplace emerges from the mists at Neocon

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Chicago is one of the world’s great cities. Its dramatic lake and river setting, its magnificent architecture and its raw energy inspire the locals and businesses to achieve great things. People work and play very hard. Competition is fierce both in business as in the way the people relate to each other, and befits a city heavily influenced by waves of immigration down the ages. Apart from somewhat overly aggressive and noisy driving, if there is friction, you don’t sense it and it isn’t obvious. Most locals seem genuinely open and friendly, including to strangers, and happy to get on with their lives without troubling others. Perhaps they’re all being buoyed up by the great street music which is everywhere.

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We should not be quite so quick to demonise the open plan office

We should not be quite so quick to demonise the open plan office

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There is a witch hunt on in the workplace. “Open plan” has become a dirty word and the national press are leading the mob in vilifying this so-called scourge. The Guardian, The Independent, The Telegraph, The Daily Mail and Business Week have all reported that “we can’t get anything done in an open-plan office” as it affects our concentration, our performance and our health. These news items are all damning, but perhaps not as damming as the Wikipedia entry on open plan which states: “A systematic survey of research upon the effects of open plan offices found frequent negative effects in some traditional workplaces: high levels of noise, stress, conflict, high blood pressure and a high staff turnover… Most people prefer closed offices… there is a dearth of studies confirming positive impacts on productivity from open plan office designs”.

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