Search Results for: anxiety

Many people think workplace is a greater source of stress than a relationship breakdown

Many people think workplace is a greater source of stress than a relationship breakdown

A new poll claims that workplace stress is having a greater impact on individuals than relationship breakdowns for many people.A new poll claims that workplace stress is seen as having a greater impact by many people, compared to relationship breakdowns. According to the survey conducted by Westfield Health, more than a quarter of workers (27 percent) ranked their job as more stressful than a relationship breakdown (8 percent). These worrying statistics highlight the negative effects of workplace stress on individuals, surpassing even stressful personal circumstances. More →

Half of gig workers earn below the minimum wage

Half of gig workers earn below the minimum wage

More than half of gig workers in the UK are paid below the minimum wage, a new study claimsAs the cost of living continues to spiral, a new report shows more than half of gig economy workers in the UK are paid below the minimum wage. The study, led by the University of Bristol, found 52 percent of gig workers doing jobs ranging from data entry to food delivery were earning below the minimum wage. On average respondents were earning £8.97 per hour – around 15 percent below the current UK minimum wage, which rose to £10.42 this month. More than three-quarters (76 percent) of survey respondents also experienced work-related insecurity and anxiety. More →

Half of people in the UK say they  feel ‘overworked’

Half of people in the UK say they feel ‘overworked’

More than half (53 percent) of employees in the UK ay they feel overworkedMore than half (53 percent) of employees in the UK ay they feel overworked, citing factors like reaching their maximum capacity, being spread too thin, or stressing over the threat of additional work – according to a poll from Censuswide, commissioned by Visier. The survey of around 1,000 people claims that young professionals aged 25-34 say they feel most overworked, followed closely by those aged 55+. Four in ten (40 percent) employees polled would look for a new job with a better work-life balance if they felt overworked.   More →

Nearly all senior managers say stress is a characteristic of their job

Nearly all senior managers say stress is a characteristic of their job

The cost-of-living crisis is the top cause of stress at work for people working in leadership and senior management rolesThe cost-of-living crisis is the top cause of stress at work for people working in leadership and senior management roles, according to the findings of a new survey by HR software provider Ciphr. Around 98 percent of the 265 leaders and senior managers polled found at least one aspect of their work stressful, while two-fifths (83 percent) are affected by three or more work-related stressors (the average, per person, is eight). Yet, despite the obvious stress their work causes them, just 4 percent claim not to like their jobs. More →

Cost of living driving employees to seek new jobs or more help from employers

Cost of living driving employees to seek new jobs or more help from employers

A large majority (84 percent) of employees are experiencing stress and anxiety due to the cost-of-living crisis, yet two-thirds of employers aren’t offering any financial or emotional supportA large majority (84 percent) of employees are experiencing stress and anxiety due to the cost-of-living crisis, yet two-thirds of employers aren’t offering any financial or emotional support. This is the key claim in a new report from Workhuman which suggests that employees across the UK are struggling with the ongoing cost-of-living crisis, with 62.5 percent considering leaving their current job if their employer doesn’t recognise their financial struggles or does nothing to support them. The survey of 1,000 full-time employees across the UK also claims that 77 percent of employees said their employer could be doing more to support them financially and emotionally through the current crisis. More →

Employees avoid telling employers about less visible disabilities

Employees avoid telling employers about less visible disabilities

The silhouette of a group of four people in an office window overlooking LondonTwo in five (43 percent) employees with a less visible disability haven’t disclosed it to their employer, according to a new poll.  The research from healthcare provider Bupa claims that not wanting to ‘cause a fuss’ (30 percent) or be treated differently (25 percent) were the key reasons for keeping their condition to themselves. Nearly a quarter of those affected (23 percent) haven’t told their employer about their condition due to worries that they wouldn’t be believed, while one in five (20 percent) expressed concerns that their disability might impact their career opportunities. More →

Always connected in the age of disconnection

Always connected in the age of disconnection

All of humanity’s problems,” the French scientist and philosopher Blaise Pascal wrote in 1654, “stem from man’s inability to sit quietly in a room alone.” He may have been right, but then again, sitting in a room alone isn’t necessarily a great state of permanent being either. There was a time we used to talk with dismay about the Japanese phenomenon of intense social distancing known as hikikomori. We would consider with horror the isolation, lack of engagement with society, poor mental health and loneliness of the people who had almost completely withdrawn to their rooms. Those poor bastards locked up in enclosed spaces linked to the outside world only by screens. More →

Mental health flagged as major concern in HSE annual stats

Mental health flagged as major concern in HSE annual stats

The nose of a black dog, as a metaphor for work related mental health issuesThe estimated number of workers in Great Britain suffering from work-related illness is 1.8 million with mental health issues related to stress, depression, and anxiety making up around half of all cases. That is the headline figure in the latest annual statistics report from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The figures from the workplace regulator show there were an estimated 914,000 cases of work-related stress, depression, or anxiety in 2021/22. An estimated 17 million working days were lost due to work-related stress, depression, or anxiety in 2021/22. This is over half of all working days lost due to work-related ill health.

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Digital skills shortage costs the UK economy £12.8 billion

Digital skills shortage costs the UK economy £12.8 billion

digital skillsWith more than 5 million Brits unable to carry out simple online tasks like sending emails or using the internet, new research reveals UK workers are missing out on additional earnings of £5.69 billion due to a lack of digital skills according to Virgin Media O2 and economic modelling from Cebr. As the UK faces ongoing economic instability and with an uncertain jobs market, the research claims that a lack of adequate digital skills could exacerbate problems being faced by cash-strapped Brits struggling to make ends meet. More than a third of Brits (34 percent) feel a lack of digital skills training has held back their earning potential already, and almost a third say they need digital skills so they can shop around for deals and save money – amid rising anxiety over the cost of living.   More →

One in four pregnant women reluctant to share news with employers

One in four pregnant women reluctant to share news with employers

An exasperated woman at a desk rests her head on her laptop to show how women, including pregnant women,  can feel let down by outdated attitudes More than one in four (26 percent) pregnant women feel reluctant to share their pregnancy news due to fear of the stigma they may face from colleagues and managers, according to a new poll from Culture Shift. This jumped to almost half (46 percent) for those who had been in employment for less than six months when they fell pregnant. The survey conducted among mothers who worked while pregnant reveals more than one in five (21 percent) know someone who has faced maternity discrimination at work, while one in eight (12 percent) have experienced it themselves. More than one in ten (11 percent) say it was their manager who discriminated against them. More →

There is no F in work

There is no F in work

Neil Usher is an energetic, wiry critic of workplaces and offices. Long ago – in 2018, actually – his proposal that the good office is composed of 12 simple elements, beginning with daylight, was also energetic and wiry. Here he widens out from the delicious nitty-gritties of temperature control and lighting in The Elemental Workplace to the wider phenomenon of work. As the title already suggests, the style is laden with expletives: there are no fewer than 25 mentions of the word ‘crap’. He is withering, too, about the ‘easiest fat-arsed squatting duck of targets, the hapless office, with its rituals and theatrics’. On top of a fresh, Elemental-style bow to the nostrum of inclusion, there is a critique of management fads, but also reference made to (white male) privilege, plus, in a lofty manner, ‘our essentially Stone Age cognitive wiring’.

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Corporate change forces managers to juggle different views of fairness

Corporate change forces managers to juggle different views of fairness

corporate changeMiddle managers get caught between different stakeholders’ perceptions of fair treatment in reaction to corporate change programmes, claims new research from Aalto University School of Business and published in the Journal of Business Ethics. According to Associate Professor Marjo-Riitta Diehl, from the Department of Management Studies, and her co-authors, these managers can often experience uncertainty, anxiety, and reluctance to take action as a result. The research was based on two rounds of interviews with managers in the German branch of an international company shortly before and after restructuring changes. More →