Search Results for: leadership

Rejection of flexible working request shouldn’t blind employers to their legal duties

Rejection of flexible working request shouldn’t blind employers to their legal duties

Amy Leech of Shoosmiths looks at a recent case following the rejection of a flexible working request and considers its implicationsFlexible working has continued in many workforces since the pandemic. The most common pattern is a hybrid one where employees split their time between the office and home. However some employees are now looking to work remotely on a permanent basis. This is what happened in Wilson v Financial Conduct Authority 2302739/2023. The Claimant submitted a flexible working application requesting to work entirely remotely using her computer and other electronic equipment and to complete all her work without attending a physical office location. The Respondent’s policy was that post-pandemic, the Claimant was expected to work in the office 40 percent of the time and could work the other 60 percent remotely. More →

Employee turnover will skyrocket if firms monitor office attendance, says former EY leader 

Employee turnover will skyrocket if firms monitor office attendance, says former EY leader 

The so-called Big Four consultancy firms risk increasing their employee turnover and drastically lowering their retention if they continue monitoring office attendanceThe so-called Big Four consultancy firms risk increasing their employee turnover and drastically lowering their retention if they continue monitoring office attendance, says former EY leader and CEO of AM Bank, Dr. Nahla Khaddage Bou-Diab. The intervention follows news that professional services giant Ernst & Young is monitoring UK staff office attendance. More →

Most firms don’t have AI guidance in place for internal comms

Most firms don’t have AI guidance in place for internal comms

Over two-thirds (71 percent) of organisations do not provide guidance on when, where or how to use AI for internal communicationsOver two-thirds (71 percent) of organisations do not provide guidance on when, where or how to use AI for internal communications, according to Gallagher’s 2023/24 State of the Sector report [registration]. Furthermore, the study, which drew insights from more than 2,300 communication and HR leaders across 56 countries, claims that 1 in 10 communicators (13 percent) were unsure if their organisation was using AI. More →

Narcissistic leaders are bad for share value but do have their uses

Narcissistic leaders are bad for share value but do have their uses

arcissistic leaders are bad for share value, unless they are seen to stimulate innovation and growth at companies suffering from corporate inertiaNarcissistic leaders are bad for share value, unless they are seen to stimulate innovation and growth at companies suffering from corporate inertia, according to research which analysed how CEO narcissism affects stock recommendations from securities analysts. The study by Nottingham Business School (UK), Middle Tennessee State University (US), and the University of Leeds (UK) is the first to explore the relationship between CEOs who are linked to excessive risk taking and their value to a company. The paper “Chief executive officer narcissism, corporate inertia, and securities analysts’ stock recommendations” has been published in the journal Strategic Organisation. More →

The three biggest disruptors of our time

The three biggest disruptors of our time

When we look at the context for change, we many times just look internally at what we think needs to change for whatever reason and then set about making that happen. Rarely do we think about what is going on for the people within the organisation and just how ready they and the organisation itself are for the actual change and the disruptors that underly it. Are there the right people, systems, processes, etc in place to support the change or are there a number of elements that will hinder it?  Not to mention the fact there will be a number of external elements that could and will also either help or hinder the change one way or another. More →

British workers don’t want people to think of them as ambitious

British workers don’t want people to think of them as ambitious

Ambition is a word now out of favour in the British workplace, according to Randstad’s latest global Workmonitor survey [registration] with workers in the UK less willing to describe themselves as ambitious than workers in other countries. The research, which surveyed 27,000 workers in 34 countries across Europe, Asia Pacific and the Americas, shows that while more than half (56 percent) of workers globally consider themselves to be ambitious, only 42 percent of workers in the UK do. Workers in other countries — including China (80 percent), Malaysia (73 percent), and India (90 percent) — are more likely to describe themselves as “having career ambition”. More →

People have some very interesting views about their own productivity, and that of everybody else

People have some very interesting views about their own productivity, and that of everybody else

Just as everybody thinks they are a better than average driver or more intelligent than average, a new survey from HR and payroll software provider Ciphr suggests that employees self-rate their own productivity far higher than they rate other people’s productivity levels.Just as everybody thinks they are a better than average driver or more intelligent than average, a new survey from HR and payroll software provider Ciphr suggests that employees self-rate their own productivity far higher than they rate other people’s productivity levels. They also think that people working in HR, marketing, and senior management roles are the least productive. According to the poll, UK employees perceive HR teams as being particularly unproductive, compared to other colleagues and departments in their organisations. More →

Over one quarter of employees do not trust their CEO to be honest and transparent

Over one quarter of employees do not trust their CEO to be honest and transparent

A new poll claims that over one quarter (26 percent) of employees in the UK do not trust their CEO to be open and honest, while 24 percent do not trust their senior leadership to do the same. According to the survey of 2,000 employees in the UK from Personio, transparency and employer-employee communication are pivotal to a positive employee experience and trust in the workplace. The research suggests that feeling unheard by leadership could be fuelling employees’ distrust. Over a quarter (28 percent) of employees surveyed say that they are not given a chance to share feedback to leadership on their experiences. Meanwhile, less than half (46 percent) of employees feel that leadership in their organisation actually listens and acts on any feedback when given from staff. More →

Gossiping at work really is bad for your career

Gossiping at work really is bad for your career

Gossiping at work can have serious negative impacts on your career, according to new research by Durham University Business School and NEOMA Business School. Not only are gossipers frowned upon by other work colleagues, they also become socially excluded in the company, and can experience negative career-related impacts as a consequence of their storytelling. More →

Amazon employee claims he was told you’ve still got a job, but not a role

Amazon employee claims he was told you’ve still got a job, but not a role

An employee claims he has been told he no longer has a role with Amazon Web Services, but that he will still be paid while he makes the finding of a new job his number one priority.Last year Amazon made headlines for making 27,000 people redundant as part of a long-term cost-cutting exercise. One of the consequences was a fall in the firm’s share price. Now an employee has claimed in a blog post that the firm is handling its downsizing in more creative ways. Justin Garrison claims in the post that has been told he no longer has a role with Amazon Web Services, but that he will still be paid while he makes the finding of a new job his number one priority. More →

We are not blank slates and we don’t adapt to change in predictable ways

We are not blank slates and we don’t adapt to change in predictable ways

An idea that has never really gone away, but which seems to be enjoying a new lease of life is the tabula rasa. The conception of people as a blank slate is something that has crept back into mainstream political and social thought for a variety of reasons. Arguably, it is also behind many of the most misleading notions about work and workplace design, perhaps most importantly that a change to some single element or characteristic of a working environment will lead to a specific outcome in the behaviour of people. More →

Workplace innovation is boosted when managers have high social status

Workplace innovation is boosted when managers have high social status

Social status of top management in a company is positively associated with workplace innovation due to greater access to resources for research and developmentSocial status of top management in a company is positively associated with innovation, including workplace innovation, due to greater access to resources for research and development (R&D), finds new research from UCD Lochlann Quinn School of Business (UCD Quinn School). The findings were first published in the journal R&D Management. More →