Search Results for: learning

Recruitment challenges are rooted in geopolitical unrest

Recruitment challenges are rooted in geopolitical unrest

recruitment challengesAccording to a new poll from SumTotal Systems 60 percent of learning and development professionals think the current wave of recruitment challenges have their roots in wider political and economic  upheavals. The report also claims that 65 percent of L&D professionals are concerned about their organisation’s ability to meet skills demand over the next 24 months, given the current UK economic outlook. More →

A great employee experience depends on great technology

A great employee experience depends on great technology

employee experienceSo often, organizations that excel on delivering value for customers, fall short when it comes to delivering the same for their employees. In fact, we can often be guilty of failing to value our employees’ time full stop. Given that we’re living through what’s been dubbed ‘the Great Resignation,’ that’s a major gamble. Companies need to take a step back and understand exactly why employee experience (EX) should be a priority. Plus, how technology can be a key enabler in doing so. More →

Younger workers want flexible working, but are sceptical of remote

Younger workers want flexible working, but are sceptical of remote

flexible workingWhile remote and flexible working roles continue to grow in almost all countries, 20-24 year olds are the age group making the fewest applications to fully remote roles, claims a new poll from LinkedIn.  LinkedIn analysed the labour market for career starters in the U.S., U.K, France and Germany – including job applications and hiring data – to understand which sectors offer the most opportunity for Gen Z job-seekers and employers looking to attract them. More →

Humanity’s omni-fear or meta-opportunity? Uncertainty Experts (with Sam Conniff)

Humanity’s omni-fear or meta-opportunity? Uncertainty Experts (with Sam Conniff)

In the latest episode of Workplace Geeks, Chris and Ian interview serial entrepreneur and purpose-driven pirate Sam Conniff, to explore his new project Uncertainty Experts. Described by Sam as an ‘interactive learning documentary’, their discussions explore the motivations behind his latest venture (with collaborators Katherine Templar Lewis, Dr Avri Bilovich and Dr Vivienne Ming), its inventive design, and Sam’s commitment to academically evaluate its impact. More →

Clerkenwell Design Week should leave us all feeling in the pink

Clerkenwell Design Week should leave us all feeling in the pink

clerkenwell design weekIt feels like a long, long time since we all came together for Clerkenwell Design Week. Mainly because it is. This month, however, conditions allow us to once again come together to enjoy the largest event this sector has to offer in the UK – you may even be reading this during the festival itself. With a vast variety of showrooms and pop-ups offering new product presentations, talks and seminars, food and drink, parties and workshops, Clerkenwell Design Week has plenty to keep even the most fidgety of us happy. More →

ESG ambitions should top organisational agendas

ESG ambitions should top organisational agendas

ESGWhen the idea of ESG (environmental, social and governance credentials) first surfaced nearly two decades ago in a 2005 United Nations report, it was just an acronym businesses were trying to understand and get to grips with. But in the last few years, ESG strategies have gathered steam – it has become integral to C-Suite strategy and business purpose, and is a deal-breaker not just for investors but also for those considering new roles. In fact, a recent report revealed that job-seekers are turning down job offers by companies showcasing weak ESG credentials, a sure sign of the importance of substantive ESG policies for potential talent. Most of the larger conglomerates (if not all) have set targets to reach net-zero by a set date – ranging from as early as 2025 to anywhere within the next two decades. But is this going far enough for employees, stakeholders, future talent, and more broadly, for society? More →

Working from home can present particular challenges for women

Working from home can present particular challenges for women

woman working from homeThe pandemic has brought with it many different trials and tribulations over the course of the past few years. An area that has impacted teams across the country, and the world, has been working from home and other forms of remote work. Once a necessity imposed by the UK government to stop the spread in the early stages of the pandemic, it has now become a part of working life for many people in many different sectors. It has offered many employees the new luxury of time: no commutes resulting in more time to spend with family and friends and creating a better work-life balance. More →

A third of workers think their jobs are at risk from automation

A third of workers think their jobs are at risk from automation

automationA new poll claims that one in three (37 percent) employees consider their current job to be at risk from automation and digital transformation. HR software provider CIPHR has compiled a list of the occupations that are the most and least likely to be replaced by technology or machines, based on the results of a survey of more than 1,000 UK workers: www.ciphr.com/jobs-at-risk-from-automation. Survey respondents were asked to rate the likelihood that their own occupation could become automated in the future, due to advances in smart technologies, artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, and robotics. More →

Growing number of firms link increased productivity to home and flexible working

Growing number of firms link increased productivity to home and flexible working

flexible workingThe number of employers who believe that an increase in homeworking and flexible working has increased their organisation’s productivity or efficiency has jumped significantly over the last year, according to new research from the CIPD. When asked in December 2020, a third (33 percent) of employers said homeworking had increased their organisation’s productivity or efficiency. However, when asked about increased home/hybrid working in October/November 2021, over two-fifths (41 percent) said these new ways of working had increased this. More →

Hybrid working and how we escape the constraints of leadership

Hybrid working and how we escape the constraints of leadership

hybrid working danceJennifer was at the ballet the other day, watching Acosta Danza, and there was a dance with ropes.  In the movement of the relationship of the dancers, the mood, the emotion were all defined using the rope.  It was very beautiful.  Then towards the end the ropes were taken away and everything changed – the performers were liberated, unconstrained.  At first like a frenzy, but then the dancers started to gel together letting go of the need for the rope.  And this got her thinking about the role of constraint in leading change, especially in the new era of hybrid working. More →

New episodes of Workplace Geeks land

New episodes of Workplace Geeks land

workplace geeksTwo new episodes of Workplace Geeks have now joined the already impressive roster of the first season. In episode 5 – The other 90 percent: ‘A Toolkit for Living in a New Building’ – Chris and Ian explore a novel approach to the ‘post-occupancy evaluation’ (or POE) of new workplaces with Dr Harriet Shortt, Associate Professor in Organisation Studies at UWE Bristol. Harriet and her collaborators (including Stride Treglown and ISG) used a participatory visual technique featuring smartphone photographs to explore the lived experiences of staff, students and visitors using their brand new £55m Bristol Business School building. All participants were invited to respond with images and accompanying comments to two simple questions: How do you feel about the building and how are you using the building? More →

The effects of workplace change may not be the ones we expect

The effects of workplace change may not be the ones we expect

There’s a scene in the 1986 horror movie The Fly in which Seth Brundle (Jeff Goldblum) persuades the reporter Veronica Quaife (Geena Davis) to try two steaks, one of which Brundle has just sent between two teleportation pods in an effort to work out why the pods can’t process organic matter, including the organic matter that had recently belonged to a very unfortunate baboon. More →

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