Search Results for: job interview

Hosting playdates is more stressful than a job interview

Hosting playdates is more stressful than a job interview

Share Button

With the summer holidays in full swing, Bella Italia researchers polled British parents around the pitfalls of keeping kids entertained and claims that hosting playdates and sleepovers is the thing we dread the most. Overall, 84 percent of parents claim having other people’s children over to play is an “extremely stressful” experience. In fact, playdates fill parents with so much dread and anxiety, that as many as 67 percent have told a lie to another parent to back out of having their child’s friend over. 43 percent said their biggest concern was their house getting trashed, while 41 percent worry about the kids being totally uncontrollable. More →

Jobseekers still looking to work for organisations that share their values

Jobseekers still looking to work for organisations that share their values

Share Button

JobseekerCovid-19 has changed the profile of today’s jobseekers and as such, an organisation’s purpose is valued more than ever suggests new research from the recruitment agency Hays. Of the 13,500 surveyed, four in five (81 percent) professionals say working at an organisation that has a strong and positive purpose aligned to their motivations is important when considering a new role. Close to half (42 percent) say this has grown in importance since the outbreak of Covid-19. More →

Third of job seekers suspect class discrimination

Third of job seekers suspect class discrimination

Share Button

Two-thirds of employees believe class is an issue when it comes to securing a new job, with one in three saying they’ve been discriminated against because of it, a new study has claimed. In contrast, more than half of employers said they don’t think class discrimination is an issue when hiring. More →

Automation now attracts workers to jobs

Automation now attracts workers to jobs

Share Button

A new report is urging employers to promote their investment in automation and technology when recruiting to avoid missing out on top talent. The What Workers Want 2019 Report (registration), released by Hays, claims that although 70 percent of organisations are investing in automation, nearly a quarter (24 percent) of employers do not currently promote their investment when recruiting. More →

Half of people have quit job due to poor work relationship with boss

Half of people have quit job due to poor work relationship with boss

Share Button

Work relationshipNew research published by Totaljobs claims that nearly half (49 percent) of workers claims that they have quit a job due to the work relationship with their boss going sour and fewer than one in five (18 percent) feel they can trust their boss. Only a third (34 percent) of workers said they felt confident they could approach their manager about a work-related issue, dropping to just 1 in 5 (20 percent) when raising a personal problem. More →

Most workers think robots could not do their jobs

Most workers think robots could not do their jobs

Share Button

Despite regular warnings about the potentially massive displacement of jobs as a result of the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’ of automation and artificial intelligence, a new, large scale survey of workers around the world suggests that a significant majority of them do not think the technology puts their own role in any kind of danger. The new report from SAP was presented this week at the World Economic Forum Annual Summit in Davos.

More →

Two fifths of new recruits don’t have the right soft skills for the job

Two fifths of new recruits don’t have the right soft skills for the job

Share Button

Two fifths of new recruits don’t have the right soft skills for the jobTwo-fifths of job-seekers are being hired into new roles only to discover they have the wrong soft skills for the job. This means over half are leaving companies because their personality or work style didn’t fit, claims news research published by HireVue. The 53 percent of those who had left for this reason saying the format of the hiring process had prevented them from discovering the mismatch earlier. While four-fifths (82 percent) of candidates are confident in their ability to articulate their soft skills and personality traits in an interview, many doubt that pre-hire assessments can showcase these important attributes. More →

Noise pollution in offices is worsening and people are leaving jobs as a result

Noise pollution in offices is worsening and people are leaving jobs as a result

Share Button

The majority of executives and employees report near-constant noise in their workplace and many say they lack quiet space for meetings or to focus, a new report from Oxford Economics, commissioned by Plantronics has claimed. According to the report, conditions are much worse now than three years ago when Oxford Economics conducted its first study. The report polled senior executives and non-manager employees in the UK and across the globe to learn more about productivity and collaboration as it relates to the open office. It found that open offices aren’t delivering on collaboration and productivity goals. Instead, employees are finding alternative ways to find quiet space and focus. In fact three quarters of employees say they need to take walks outside and 32 percent listen to headphones to focus and block out distraction, while employees in the noisiest office environments are more likely to say they’ll leave their job in the next six months.

More →

War for talent is increasing as recruits have higher expectations than ever of a new job

War for talent is increasing as recruits have higher expectations than ever of a new job

Share Button

War for talent grows, with recruits having higher expectations than ever of a new jobAs employment levels rise, employers are facing stronger competition to attract and retain staff. Now the latest research suggests there is an escalation in the ‘war for talent’, as nine out of 10 new hires admit they would leave a job that fails to meet expectations within a month. According to research commissioned by Robert Half of 9,000 candidates in 11 countries across four continents, nearly half (47 percent) admit they decide whether they would or wouldn’t accept a position straight after the initial meeting. Highlighting that first impressions count, a further one fifth (20 percent) know if they are interested after the first communication (call/email), while 17 percent typically decide within the first five minutes of the interview.  Less than one in 10 (9 percent) wait until they have completed subsequent interviews to decide and merely 7 percent decide during contractual negotiations. Even once candidates have accepted a role, 91 percent admit they would consider leaving a job within their first month and 93 percent during their probation period.

More →

Quarter of UK managers would take a pay cut for a job with a clear purpose beyond profit

Quarter of UK managers would take a pay cut for a job with a clear purpose beyond profit

Share Button

Quarter of UK managers would take a pay cut for job with purpose beyond profitMore than a quarter of managers (27 percent) in British companies would likely accept a salary cut to work for a company that has a clear purpose beyond profit a new report claims.  A third (32 percent) would actually consider leaving their job if a greater purpose was unclear, while more than half (53 percent) would if their company’s values and purpose didn’t align with their own. The YouGov survey, commissioned by Danone UK, highlights the importance of having a defined company purpose that marries commercial success with social progress.  The findings support a new report by not-for-profit think tank Tomorrow’s Company and Danone UK, that explores the importance of having a purpose beyond profit in helping companies to prosper in the face of workplace challenges created by an uncertain world. The Courage of their Convictions is built from interviews with senior leaders from within some of the UK’s biggest purpose-driven brands, including Danone, John Lewis, Mars, Philips, Tata Consultancy Services and Unilever.

More →

Bored and needing a challenge are top reasons for seeking a new job in 2018

Bored and needing a challenge are top reasons for seeking a new job in 2018

Share Button

Bored and needing a challenge are top reasons for seeking a new job in 2018

January is the month when employees contemplate moving on to pastures new and being bored and needing a challenge would be the top reasons for seeking a new job in 2018 cited by a third (33 percent) of respondents to global research from Korn Ferry. When asked what their typical first step is when looking for a new job, almost half (44 percent) cited networking. And in terms of the top ways to network, reconnecting with current and former friends/colleagues and LinkedIn came out on top for 33 percent and 31 percent respectively.  The research found that while 23 percent of respondents said updating their CV is their first step to landing a new role, 19 percent said their first step is taking an inventory of what kind of job would make them the happiest. The grass isn’t necessarily greener however, as nearly half (46 percent) said they were turned down for a job because the interviewer did not take the time to fully understand their qualifications and more than half (53 percent) of respondents said that people who interviewed them for a job were only “somewhat prepared,” “ill-prepared” or “very ill-prepared.”

More →

Third of applicants turn down jobs due to lack of flexible work options

Third of applicants turn down jobs due to lack of flexible work options

Share Button

With employment at record levels and the labour market the fiercest it’s been for years, candidates have more choice about where they work than ever before. This is putting substantial pressures on companies to impress talented individuals through the entire recruitment and onboarding process if they want to keep them for the long term. But new research suggests that nearly half (45 percent) of job candidates have turned down a position because they weren’t impressed by the company during the interview process. According to the research by NGA Human Resources other common reasons for declining a position include having a better offer from another company (56 percent), lower than expected salary offer (49 percent) and finding out the role was not as originally described (44 percent). Modern job seekers are now looking for more than just a decent salary. In fact, 33 percent of candidates have declined a position because they didn’t have flexible work options, 29 percent due to the lack of a good benefits package and 27 percent because they didn’t feel they would fit in with their new colleagues.

More →

Translate >>