Low paid workers and those in precarious jobs bearing brunt of Covid-19

Low paid workers and those in precarious jobs bearing brunt of Covid-19

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New research by the Institute for Employment Studies (IES) think tank, funded by Standard Life Foundation, suggests that low paid workers are bearing the brunt of the Covid-19 crisis. The analysis provides what it says is the first detailed assessment of official Labour Force Survey data for the post-crisis period. More →

Nearly all businesses are aware of disability issues, but more needs to be done

Nearly all businesses are aware of disability issues, but more needs to be done

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A new study of 120 global brands shows how over 90 per cent of businesses now recognise the importance of disabled employees and customers. The study is the first to consider how businesses are serving the needs of disabled people at a global and local level and how to share best practice. More →

Leaders need to develop a high care quotient for the new challenges they face

Leaders need to develop a high care quotient for the new challenges they face

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Everything has taken a hit in 2020. Nothing has gone unscathed or unchanged – and the same goes for leadership. From boardrooms to living rooms, meeting rooms to spare rooms, leadership has moved away from face-to-face interactions to digital communications. Meanwhile, forward-thinking initiatives, spurred on by continuing diversity imbalances and widening gender pay gaps, have been put on hold. Following government guidance, only half of businesses published their 2018-19 gender pay gap report – which could reportedly push gender equality back a whole generation. We are risking losing sight of what’s important to us – and unless we’re intentional about how we make systemic, much-needed organisational changes, they’re not going to happen if we only focus on more ‘critical’ things, or keeping the lights on. More →

COVID anxiety changing commuter travel habits, according to research

COVID anxiety changing commuter travel habits, according to research

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commutersAround 6 in 10 London commuters will change the way they travel when the return to work begins, research by Addison Lee claims, with COVID-19 safety concerns changing transport demand patterns. More →

One in four LGBT+ employees in the UK completely closeted at work

One in four LGBT+ employees in the UK completely closeted at work

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LGBT employeesResearch from Accenture suggests that, despite some signs of progress, LGBT+ employees face significant challenges at work. Almost 70 percent of leaders surveyed believe they foster an empowering workplace environment, however 86 percent of LGBT+ employees do not feel fully supported. More →

Majority of businesses moving forward with international expansion

Majority of businesses moving forward with international expansion

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international expansionNew research released by Globalization Partners and CFO Research, suggests that most businesses are undeterred by the impact of COVID-19 and are still moving forward with plans for new or expanded international operations. More than half of the respondents expressed interest in expanding or adding operations in the Asia-Pacific region. The findings also claim that 83 percent of respondents said they are looking into a remote, global workforce model as a solution to the changes brought about by COVID-19. More →

The traditional commute to work may be a thing of the past

The traditional commute to work may be a thing of the past

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A majority of corporate real estate professionals (58 percent) in a recent survey say that the traditional nine to five, Monday to Friday work pattern is a thing of the past. The survey was conducted by CoreNet Global, the professional association for corporate real estate professionals – those who have responsibility for managing the real estate, including workplace configuration and locations, at large corporations globally. The survey was conducted among “end-users” only from May 27 – June 16. More →

Working life set to become more precarious and unequal

Working life set to become more precarious and unequal

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precarious working lifeThe future of work is likely to be even more precarious and unequal, according to a new research review from academics at Durham University Business School, Kings College Business School and University Paris-Dauphine. Dr. Jeremy Aroles, Assistant Professor in Organisation Studies at Durham University Business School, alongside colleagues, Dr. Nathalie Mitev (King’s College) and Professor François?Xavier de Vaujany (University Paris-Dauphine), reviewed a wide range of research related to working life new work practices and summarised this into a number of predictions for the future of work. This research review paper was published in the journal ‘New Technology, Work and Employment’, which is open access throughout June. More →

Third of workforce expect role to vanish within three years

Third of workforce expect role to vanish within three years

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WorkforceA new study by Mercer claims the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent uncertainty are accelerating changes in the way organisations around the world are working and will continue to work into the future. Particularly in challenging times, employers are focusing on their workforce, specifically fostering healthy lifestyles, supporting financial wellness and providing skills and training as careers change due to AI and technology developments. More →

Loneliness has always been a workplace issue

Loneliness has always been a workplace issue

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Loneliness is increasingly recognised as a serious issue in modern society. In the UK, the Office of National Statistics reported that 5 percent of adults feel lonely ‘often’ or ‘always’, with further 16 percent of adults reporting feeling lonely ‘sometimes’, equivalent to approximately 9 million adults suffering from loneliness to some degree. More →

Higher female state pension age causes an increase in older women at work

Higher female state pension age causes an increase in older women at work

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female state pension ageThe number of women aged between 60 and 64 in work has increased by 51 percent since the 1995 Pensions Act came into effect which increased the female state pension age from 60 to 65 since 2010, claims research from Rest Less, a jobs, volunteering and guidance site for the over 50s.

Between October and December 2009, there were 644,674 women aged between 60 and 64 in work. In the same period in 2019, there were 976,376 women aged between 60 and 64 in work – an increase of 331,702 or 51 per cent. This contrasts with an increase of only 127,882 (or 13 percent) in the number of men working aged between 60 and 64 over the same period. More →

Office politics major source of work related stress

Office politics major source of work related stress

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Perkbox commissioned a new study of 1,815 employed people to present a examination into the changing landscape of work-related stress in 2020. The study compared results to 2018 data in order to identify how sources of work-related stress and the solutions offered by employers are changing. The study claims that 79 percent of adults in employment commonly experience work-related stress. More →

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