Search Results for: workplace

The rise of the pods shows how the workplace pendulum swings

The rise of the pods shows how the workplace pendulum swings

Workplace designers removed the walls. And the furniture industry is selling them back to us; now portable and demountable.Long before the office died (I read its obituary in several publications) there were hotly contested debates about open plan offices. That is of course before those debates were eclipsed by more current workplace rantings (ask the editor). Skimming through the open-plan office timeline, Herman Miller launched action office, L-shaped desks with screens became shared benches, and decades later tech brands rolled out efficient open-plan workspaces around the globe, with Facebook creating the biggest open-plan office of all time with 2,800 employees. Gulp. Open plan officer workers and workplace professionals moaned about acoustics, stress, and more recently, germs in large open workspaces. More →

Firms struggle to get a grip on people data despite workplace challenges

Firms struggle to get a grip on people data despite workplace challenges

A new CIPD survey of business leaders claims there is a significant mismatch between the scale of the challenge that workplace issues currently pose to businesses and how often workforce issues and people data are discussed by senior leaders.A new CIPD survey of business leaders claims there is a significant mismatch between the scale of the challenge that workplace issues currently pose to businesses and how often workforce issues and people data are discussed by senior leaders. In response, the CIPD is warning that organisations are unlikely to perform well in the long term unless decisions taken at a board and executive management level are informed by an in-depth and evidence-based understanding of the value and risk their workforce poses. More →

People are split on whether hybrid working improves or worsens ‘workplace community’

People are split on whether hybrid working improves or worsens ‘workplace community’

People are still undecided on whether remote and hybrid working are having a positive or negative impact on their ‘workplace community’. According to a new poll,People are still undecided on whether remote and hybrid working are having a positive or negative impact on their ‘workplace community’. According to a new poll, 37 per cent of UK employees feel that hybrid work has made it harder to create a workplace community but 41 per cent disagree. These are the findings from O.C. Tanner’s 2023 Global Culture Report which collected and analysed the perspectives of over 36,000 employees, leaders, HR practitioners, and business executives from 20 countries around the world, including 4,653 from the UK. More →

New study will explore the impact of economic turmoil on workplace experience

New study will explore the impact of economic turmoil on workplace experience

eople's workplace experience in the wake of recent economic upheavals is to be investigated as part of a major new survey led by Cardiff UniversityPeople’s workplace experience in the wake of recent economic upheavals is to be investigated as part of a major new survey led by Cardiff University and funded mainly by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). The Skills and Employment Survey 2023 (SES2023), which also involves researchers at UCL, the Universities of Oxford and Surrey and the National Centre for Social Research, will help academics assess the impact of an extraordinary period of turbulence for workers which includes the economic downturn, Cost-of-Living Crisis, Covid-19 and Brexit. More →

Issue 13 of IN Magazine celebrates ten years of workplace insight

Issue 13 of IN Magazine celebrates ten years of workplace insight

The new issue of In Magazine has now been published. It marks ten years of Workplace Insight with a few things we think we know about work, working culture and work places.The new issue of In Magazine has now been published. It marks ten years of Workplace Insight with a few things we think we know about work, working culture and work places. Elsewhere in this issue: Stephanie Fitzgerald talks about the unspoken privilege of wellbeing; we consider the sprawl of the world’s megacities; Jo Knight argues that the office sector needs to really up its game on the environment; Rene Stevens makes the case for a strategic approach to learning environments; we weigh up the pros and cons of retrofit and new builds; Neil Usher sets out to develop a universally acceptable definition of hybrid working; Andy Brown on what we really need data for; why dead tech hangs around; and we do the maths on what it means when people say the office should be worth the commute it takes to get to it. More →

A workplace for entrepreneurial mindsets to thrive should be your goal

A workplace for entrepreneurial mindsets to thrive should be your goal

Workplace entrepreneurial mindsetThese days it seems like everyone is looking to become more entrepreneurial. It’s a word that’s often used by big companies on the hunt for innovative thinkers and new ways of doing things. But sadly, the workplace doesn’t always work for those with entrepreneurial minds. It is too rigid, too hierarchical, too conventional. Entrepreneurs, by nature, are rule-breakers, always looking for new opportunities and fresh ideas that could change the world. From my research, they differ from other businesspeople in some fundamental ways – six ways, to be exact. More →

Wellbeing and organisational agility will dominate workplace conversations in 2023

Wellbeing and organisational agility will dominate workplace conversations in 2023

Mental health and wellbeing will dominate conversations about the role of work in people's lives this yearMental health and wellbeing will dominate conversations about the role of work in people’s lives this year, due in part to the effects of the global pandemic, as well as social and economic instability around the world, according to the latest megatrends report from UKG. The report claims that many people are feeling overwhelmed in the face of negative news cycles headlining economic uncertainty, climate change, violence, and political unrest have contributed to a spike in mental wellbeing issues. More →

Never mind the workplace predictions, here’s some bollocks

Never mind the workplace predictions, here’s some bollocks

A painting of Janus to depict the number of workplace predictions and retrospectives at the end of the yearTime of the year for looking backwards and forwards. For workplace predictions and retrospectives. The Economist announces that the word / term of the year is hybrid work. This is interesting because, although The Economist is using it as an interchangeable term for flexible working as many do, a great deal of energy is still expounded on defining exactly what it means. We may work out when the obsession with three days in the office, two at home thing started. But for now, determining where people are at any given time doesn’t seem very flexible to me. More →

‘Hybrid working hell’ awaits organisations that don’t address workplace culture

‘Hybrid working hell’ awaits organisations that don’t address workplace culture

Devil takes the hindmost when it comes to hybrid workingA new report – ‘Hybrid Heaven or Hell? The journey to hybrid working’ from Poly and the Worktech Academy claims that organisations should carry out an audit to evaluate aspects of of their workplace culture and establish what works and what needs to evolve for hybrid working success. The report includes research from Gallup, Gartner, and Harvard Business Review, as well as Poly’s own insights and findings. The broader research trends were also discussed and debated in a New York roundtable attended by senior workplace design and technology leaders. The report highlights that organisations have been faced with challenges of building and retaining culture which could have a lasting impact on innovation, talent retention and growth. More →

TRILUX energy efficient lighting proves fit for the flexible, inclusive workplace of the future

TRILUX energy efficient lighting proves fit for the flexible, inclusive workplace of the future

The reception area of the new TRILUX installation for JLLA new installation at 20 Water Street in London allows a world leading, real estate services company to create a user-friendly, innovative workspace. The impressive downlight range from TRILUX opened the door to a complementary, tech-smart sustainable workplace lighting scheme – fit for the future of work.  Global real estate advisor JLL’s new Canary Wharf office is in one of the most sustainable buildings in the UK. It recently relocated some of its London-based teams to the second and third floors at 20 Water Street, Wood Wharf. The move is part of its commitment to shaping the workplace for its employees, providing a flexible and inclusive work environment underpinned by a sustainable and technologically advanced workplace that boasts excellent connectivity and amenities. More →

Workplaces are plagued by classism, report claims

Workplaces are plagued by classism, report claims

Toffs and Toughs famous photo that illustrate class divide and classismA new poll claims to highlight the need to tackle classism at work, with 57 percent of employees witnessing discrimination or a lack of inclusivity in the last year alone. A third of UK employees say classism is active in their workplace, according to the 2022 Diversity & Inclusion in the Workplace Report from Wildgoose. The report is based on a survey of employees from 133 UK workplaces. It asked if their workplace is an inclusive environment, what areas of diversity their organisation could improve upon, and whether they have experienced discrimination or inequality in the workplace. More →

The workplace circus continues to entertain, but back in the real world…

The workplace circus continues to entertain, but back in the real world…

A painting of a clown sitting alone, waiting to enter the workplace circusThe Great Workplace Circus headlines its 322nd show of the year with everybody’s favourite distraction, Elon Musk, being driven into the ring by his own shoddily built clown car, declaring he needs everybody at Twitter to be ‘extremely hardcore’ before sacking a few people from his space programme, then setting fire to the tent himself. The swarm of stories spawned by this extraordinary behaviour include this tired and predictable rant in the Telegraph about ‘lazy Brits’. Ironically, there’s nothing lazier than a columnist on this rag with some space to fill. More →