Search Results for: consequences

Study examines consequences of workplace bullying

Study examines consequences of workplace bullying

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New research reveals how frequently being the target of workplace bullying not only leads to health-related problems but can also cause victims to behave badly themselves. More →

Uncertainty about the consequences of Brexit in construction sector

Uncertainty about the consequences of Brexit in construction sector 0

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BrexitUncertainty about the consequences of a possible UK vote to leave the EU is having an adverse effect on the country’s construction pipeline, according to the Markit/CPS survey of activity in the market. According to the study, new building orders declined during May for the first time in three years although at 51.2, the index remains above the neutral 50 threshold which indicates that the trend remains positive. The May study specifically asked respondents how their work had been affected by the Brexit vote with one third saying it had had a negative effect. Meanwhile, an April study from CBRE found that demand for office space in London had remained robust through the first quarter despite fears that uncertainty about the market and the wider economy related to the referendum would dampen demand. Meanwhile, a new survey from the IEMA claims that two-thirds of members believe environmental issues will be given lower priority if the UK leaves the EU.

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Study confirms that commuting by car has serious health consequences

Study confirms that commuting by car has serious health consequences 0

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Adults who commute to work via cycling or walking have markedly lower body fat percentage and body mass index (BMI) measures in their mid-life compared to adults who commute via car, according to a new study in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal. Even people who commute via public transport also showed reductions in BMI and percentage body fat compared with those who commuted only by car. This suggests that even the incidental physical activity involved in taking journeys by public transport may be significant. The study looked at data from over 150,000 individuals from the UK Biobank dataset, a large, observational study of 500,000 individuals aged between 40 and 69 in the UK. The study is the largest to date to analyse the health benefits of active transport. The strongest associations were seen for adults who commuted via bicycle, compared to those who commute via car.

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Context can shape the ethical decisions people make

Context can shape the ethical decisions people make

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utilitarianWhen faced with a moral dilemma, people usually respond in one of three ways, and the moral decision changes according to the setting, claims recent research from Hebrew University of Jerusalem, UCL School of Management, and Harvard University. The work by Professors Netta Barak-Corren, Chia-Jung Tsay, Fiery Cushman, and Max Bazerman, suggests that people may tackle an ethical problem by using the utilitarian principle, action principle, or intention principle. More →

The future of work has no destination, there is only the journey

The future of work has no destination, there is only the journey

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One of the truisms about depictions of the future is that they often have more to say about the world in which we live than the one to come. So, when George Orwell wrote 1984 the story goes that its title was derived by inverting the numbers of the year in which it was written – 1948. Whatever the truth of this, Orwell understood it was a book as much about the world in which he lived as the one it portrayed. Our images of the future are invariably refracted through the prism of the present. This is just as true for predictions about the future of work.

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One million young workers set to leave London before turning 33

One million young workers set to leave London before turning 33

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Young workers

The number of young workers leaving London is on the rise, with net migration away from the capital growing, claims new research from Totaljobs and Professor of Economics at Lancaster University, Geraint Johnes. The new research, taken from analysis of ONS data as well as the views of 2,000 Londoners, suggests that since 2014, more than one million professionals have left London, with just 900,000 coming in. This is a net loss of 88 workers every day, with the biggest shortfall down to workers aged 25-34, the majority (54 percent) of them having given up hope of ever owning property in the capital. There has been a 49 percent increase in outbound migration of those in their 30s over the last five years. More →

Remote working has no effect on careers, research suggests. But…

Remote working has no effect on careers, research suggests. But…

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Working from home is known to be good for a strong work-life balance, advantageous for employee productivity, and is even touted as being beneficial for the environment. However, telecommuting has also carried a stigma that employees who work remotely have difficulties rising in their career. More →

Flexible working: one in three undeterred by career damage

Flexible working: one in three undeterred by career damage

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flexible workingOne in three US workers have told researchers nothing would stop them from taking advantage of flexible working options, despite the potential damage to their career. According to a survey of 1,000 US white-collar professionals by Deloitte, another one in three say the consequences for their professional growth and lack of trust from managers would put them off working flexibly. Eight in ten respondents agreed a traditional work setting, defined as regular attendance at an office or working normal business hours, is important for advancing their career. More →

Third of freelancers plan to stop contracting in UK due to IR35

Third of freelancers plan to stop contracting in UK due to IR35

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IR35Nearly a third of freelancers are planning to stop contracting in the UK because the changes to IR35 due in the private sector in April, research has claimed. One in seven freelancers (13 percent) plan to find contracts abroad, 11 percent plan to stop working or retire early and 8 percent plan to move into employment, according to IPSE (the Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-Employed). Half of the freelancers surveyed also said they will only continue freelancing if they can find contracts to which the new off-payroll working rules do not apply. More →

Stress, sickie days and a beamish response to it all

Stress, sickie days and a beamish response to it all

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Stress, uncertainty and the medicalisation of dissatisfactionThis is a piece to mark National Sickie Day, which is today. We now have a policy of not offering ourselves as an outlet for any of the deluge of comment pieces and surveys that are published each year to mark days like this. This is largely because we cover the issue year round so don’t feel the need to add to the PR feeding frenzy that they generate. Whatever you make of the findings of the these reports and others like them, even cynics would have to acknowledge they tap into an unmistakable  feeling that work is not as enjoyable as it should be. More →

Can corporate culture help reduce workforce burnout?

Can corporate culture help reduce workforce burnout?

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burnoutIt may not always be evident to those working in logistics, but burnout doesn’t exist solely in supply chain recruitment – it’s a recognised condition which is having an impact across all industries and sectors.  According to the Labour Force Survey, the UK lost 15.4 million working days in 2017/18 to work-related stress, depression or anxiety, with 239,000 new cases reported. Increasingly, severe cases are being recognised as ‘burnout’. More →

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is upon us and we`re not ready for it

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is upon us and we`re not ready for it

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fourth industrial revolution Cast your mind back a decade or so and consider how the future looked then. A public horizon of Obama-imbued “yes we can” and a high tide of hope and tolerance expressed in the London Olympics provides one narrative theme; underlying austerity-induced pressure another. Neither speaks directly to our current world of divisive partisan politics, toxic social media use, competing facts and readily believed fictions. More →

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