About Neil Franklin

Neil Franklin is Insight's news editor

Posts by Neil Franklin:

Report reveals astonishing cost of congested road system during rush hour

Report reveals astonishing cost of congested road system during rush hour

Share Button

UK drivers wasted an average of 31 hours in rush hour traffic last year, costing each motorist £1,168, a study by traffic data firm Inrix suggests. The UK is the world’s 10th most congested country and London is Europe’s second most gridlocked city after Moscow, according to the report which claims that overall traffic congestion cost UK drivers more than £37.7 billion in 2017

More →

Part time work and career breaks are a fundamental driver of gender pay gap

Part time work and career breaks are a fundamental driver of gender pay gap

Share Button

gender pay gapParents are being hit by a “pay penalty” if they work in part-time jobs, according to a new study from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and the Institute for Fiscal Studies. The report found that mothers in particular tend to spend more time in part-time employment, so they do not benefit from pay rises associated with more experience, research found. By the time a first child reaches the age of 20, mothers earn around 30 percent less on average than similarly educated fathers, said the report, and the issue is a fundamental driver of the gender pay gap.

More →

Self-employed work an extra month each year compared to full time employees

Self-employed work an extra month each year compared to full time employees

Share Button

One in seven British people work an additional month every year, according to a new survey of 1,000 self-employed workers. The report claims that the self-employed work on average an additional 14 hours per week, compared to permanent roles. The survey, commissioned by online accounting firm Crunch also claims that January is the most stressful time of the year for a third (31 percent) of self-employed workers. The report claims that two thirds (66 percent) of respondents find it difficult to switch off and get to sleep because of work stress, with 72 percent saying financial concerns keep them awake at night, and over one in ten (15 percent) saying it is due to business deadlines, such as the looming self-assessment tax deadline on 31st January.

More →

If you are flourishing under a psychopath boss, it may be because you are a psychopath too

If you are flourishing under a psychopath boss, it may be because you are a psychopath too

Share Button

It’s still perfectly possible to flourish under a psychopath boss, provided you are one too, according to new research that found the people best placed to cope with a psychopathic manager are those who are psychopaths too; largely because they are not as upset at the bad treatment.  In the workplace, employees respond differently to abusive management styles, in part due to their varying levels of psychopathy, according to a new study from the University of Notre Dame. Certain types of psychopaths actually benefit and flourish under abusive bosses, according to Are ‘Bad’ Employees Happier Under Bad Bosses? Differing Effects of Abusive Supervision on Low and High Primary Psychopathy Employees. The study is published in the Journal of Business Ethics by Charlice Hurst, assistant professor of management in Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business.

More →

Public sector and flexible workspaces drive record office uptake

Public sector and flexible workspaces drive record office uptake

Share Button

A new report from GVA Grimley claims that the commercial property markets in the UK’s major cities outside London enjoyed a record breaking final quarter to 2017. According to its Big Nine report, analysing the office occupier markets of key UK regional cities, total take-up for the year amounted to over 10 million sq ft for the first time, well over the 9.5 million sq ft. witnessed at the peak of the market in 2015. The record level of take-up was underpinned by significant lettings to the public sector, in particular the Government Property Unit (GPU), as well as the continuing exponential growth of the serviced office and coworking sector.

More →

Two fifths of people think their jobs will be obsolete within a decade

Two fifths of people think their jobs will be obsolete within a decade

Share Button

A new survey from job site Jobbio claims that more than two fifths of British workers think their job will be obsolete in as little as ten years, compared to over a third of those in the US. Respondents believe roles such as travel agents, telemarketers and factory workers will all disappear. in the longer term, a little over two-fifths of 2,000 British respondents (41 percent) think that they won’t be able to retire until the ages of 70-74 in 2050 with less than a fifth (14 percent) thinking they will get to retire under the age of 65. The survey focuses on the issue of happiness and what makes people happy at work. It found that there are some marked differences between the two countries although people are universally keen to address the issue of work life balance.

More →

US workers increasingly prioritise flexible working and personal development over status

US workers increasingly prioritise flexible working and personal development over status

Share Button

A new survey from LinkedIn and Harris claims that the priorities of US workers are shifting in the new world of work. Where once they would have craved the status of a corner office, they now hanker for personal development, flexible working and autonomy and many see work largely as a means to pay bills. A growing number of professionals are also keen on developing side projects away from work that they believe are more closely aligned with their personality and interests, according o the study of 2,000 people.

More →

Working families at breaking point as parents buckle under the strain of overwork, claims study

Working families at breaking point as parents buckle under the strain of overwork, claims study

Share Button

The UK’s working parents are struggling to cope with the strain of overwork – and deliberately stalling and downshifting their careers to reverse the negative impact it is having on family life, according to a new study. The 2018 Modern Families Index, published today by work life charity Working Families and Bright Horizons, reveals the stress of the modern workplace is pushing parents to breaking point, creating a ‘parenthood penalty’. According to the study, many parents are obliged to work far over their contracted hours due to increasingly intense workloads or because they feel it is expected of them.

More →

One third of UK professionals suffer from depression or anxiety, and work is a key contributor

One third of UK professionals suffer from depression or anxiety, and work is a key contributor

Share Button

Over a third (35.2 percent) of the nation’s workers are suffering from mental health issues, with four in 10 (42.9 percent) admitting that their job is a key contributor to these feelings. That’s according to a survey from job site CV-Library which claims that for 70.6 percent of those that suffer, their depression or anxiety can sometimes have a negative effect on their working life, while a further 17.9 percent said it always negatively impacts their working life.

More →

One in ten people have fantasised about killing their boss

One in ten people have fantasised about killing their boss

Share Button

A new survey of 2,200 people claims that one in ten have fantasised about killing their boss at some point. Construction workers emerged as having the worst relationship with their line managers with nearly a quarter admitting to murderous thoughts (22 percent), followed closely by those working in the media industry (15 percent). The report from B2B comparison site Expert Market claims that more than half of respondents (52 percent) said that they hate their job specifically because of their boss. In fact, one in five workers said that they would actually turn down a pay rise in favour of firing their manager and it’s because people think their boss is not fit for purpose. The majority of those asked (73 percent) believe that they could do their boss’ job far better than them, particularly those in the energy and entertainment industries; 86 percent and 81 percent, respectively.

More →

Full time work has an adverse effect on wellbeing and happiness of mothers, study claims

Full time work has an adverse effect on wellbeing and happiness of mothers, study claims

Share Button

Mothers of children under the age of three who don’t work full time are generally more happy than those in full-time employment, a new study published in the Journal of Happiness Studies claims. The survey by Dana Hamplová of the Czech Academy of Sciences asked 5,000 mothers from 30 European countries to make a subjective assessment of their levels of wellbeing and happiness. It found that there was a small but significant increase in happiness among mothers who were not working, compared to full-time workers. The report found there were no differences in the self-reported levels of happiness of non-working mothers and those who work part time.

More →

Businesses lost an estimated £20.2 bn from data breaches last year

Businesses lost an estimated £20.2 bn from data breaches last year

Share Button

Hackers stole or compromised an estimated £20.2bn worth of records from businesses in 2017, new research claims. After news that Uber failed to disclose a massive hack in 2016, VPN (Virtual Private Network) comparison site BestVPN.com analysed more than 200 data breaches dating back to 2004, looking at the number of records compromised, the industries most likely to be affected and the value of those breaches. Late last year Equifax became the victim of one of the most high profile hacks in history, with 143m records stolen, equating to an estimated £15bn worth of data lost*. While there have previously been attacks where more records were compromised, such as Yahoo’s 1bn back in December 2016, the Equifax breach was notable because the data stolen included social Security numbers and personal identification. IBM revealed in its Cost of a Data Breach Study 2017 that the average cost of a stolen record was £104.25, or £2.7m per hack.

More →

Translate >>