Search Results for: social media

Company reputations can live or die by the behaviour of employees on social media

Company reputations can live or die by the behaviour of employees on social media

Share Button

A recent survey from law firm Herbert Smith Freehills suggests that 95 percent of large organisations polled expected a rise in the number of employees using social media, such as Twitter, to raise complaints and concerns about their company over the next five years. It is an extremely worrying development for business. While social media can in general be a great platform for everyone to have their voice heard, in this context, it takes an internal issue to a public space and it could do a great deal of harm to the business concerned. An aggrieved employee tweeting criticisms of their company has the potential to go viral, garnering vast numbers of likes and reaping untold damage to the reputation and brand of the organisation concerned. More →

Employees spend thirteen work hours a week on social media

Employees spend thirteen work hours a week on social media

Share Button

Whether it’s Instagram, Facebook or Twitter, social media is an inescapable part of modern life and in turn, the modern workplace. New research conducted by Croner, claims that on average UK employees spend 13 hours a week on social media in work time. In addition to this, the study which surveyed over 1,300 UK employees, claims that Instagram was the social media channel of choice for people to pass the time during their working day and the most popular hours for employee social media usage were between 3pm-5pm. More →

Many office furniture firms remain confused about social media and online communication

Many office furniture firms remain confused about social media and online communication

Share Button

At Watson King we surveyed the websites of the Top 100 European manufacturers of office furniture products, the results showed that 13 percent use no form of social media at all and 25 percent use less than three types. There are also some surprising results on which the most popular channels are. There is evidence to suggest that companies are unsure about the most effective way to use social media channels and which ones are the most appropriate to select. Also, there appears to be fundamental issues on how to integrate social media and communication channels to get the best results.

More →

UK workers waste over two hours a day on social media and other distractions

UK workers waste over two hours a day on social media and other distractions

Share Button

UK workers waste over two hours a day on social media and other distractions

UK workers spend just 3.7 days out of five doing office-related work, a new survey has claimed. According to research by Rebootonline.com – workers spend more than two hours a day procrastinating; including around three hours and five minutes of a working week on social media. In monetary terms this means companies are paying out on average £8,851.14 per employee for this time wasted annually. In the survey of UK office workers, it was discovered that on average, they were spending 122 minutes a day procrastinating; essentially, only working 73 percent of the hours they are employed to do. The annual income for office workers surveyed averaged at £32,782. Taking this into account, workers spend 27 percent of their time not doing the job they have been paid to, with companies paying out £8,851.14 per employee for this time wasted. The use of social media at work during office hours was the most popular form of internet usage; with 38 percent of office employees browsing social media sites more than any other website; with people spending 33 minutes’ daily surfing other websites.

More →

Workers spend less time on social media and non-work technology in a bid to restore work life balance

Workers spend less time on social media and non-work technology in a bid to restore work life balance 0

Share Button

According to a new survey by job site CV-Library, over two thirds of workers (67.4 percent) don’t use social media whilst at work, and of those that do, the majority (45 percent) will only do so for up to 15 minutes. The study surveyed 1,200 workers on their opinions around technology in the workplace, and whether it is a distraction or an enabler to professionals. Interestingly, the survey claims that despite 56.1 percent admitting that they use smart phones while they’re at work, the majority (79.8 percent) do not use technology to do personal tasks during work hours. Many 0f the respondents cite the desire for a better work life balance as the main reason for their behaviour.

More →

An inconsistent approach to social media can jeopardise your job prospects

Share Button

With around 260 million worldwide users, of which there are over 13 million in the UK, LinkedIn has become the ‘go to’ site for many job seekers. But, as is the case with social media, use it unwisely and you can jeopardise your chances of career progression. A survey of 2,000 British workers by employment recruiter Randstad found that while three-fifths (61%) of employees tailor their CV when they are applying for a new job, less than one-fifth (19%) amend their LinkedIn profiles to match, and over a third (34%) don’t tailor either their CV or their LinkedIn profiles. The research also highlighted the different tactics used by men and women. While a quarter (26%) of men will tailor their LinkedIn profile when applying for a new job, only 14 percent of women will do so. Far more women tailor their CV only (52%) as opposed to 46 percent of men.

More →

Rise in staff social media profiling will transform the workplace

Share Button

Digital monitoring of staff will transform the workplace claims surveyWhether or not the younger generation are in fact more technically astute is still open to debate, but one thing is clear, they’re far less perturbed at the idea of being digitally monitored than the older generation. New research reveals that the younger generation are more open to sharing their personal data with their employees, with 36 per cent of Generation Y workers saying they would be happy to do so. Nearly a third of people would be happy for their employer to have access to their personal data, such as social media profiles and this kind of data monitoring of employees will rise over the next decade as Generation Y enters the workforce. Given the fact that by 2020 this generation will form half of the global workforce – they’re set to bring with them their different attitudes to technology and personal data. More →

Two fifths of workers ignore social media bans – and they’re right

Share Button

We all remember the days, not that long ago, when companies actively discouraged the use of personal technology and social media at work. How quickly things change. Now many firms not only want people to use their own smartphones, they pretend that it was their idea all along by labelling it BYOD. Some even measure their employees’ social engagement and judge them on it. Even those firms who maintain policies to restrict the use of social media may be fighting a losing battle according to new research from Samsung Electronics, which found that British employees are most likely to ignore them. But then again, maybe businesses shouldn’t worry about it because a growing body of research suggests that people who use social media tend to be more collaborative and productive at work.

More →

Good practice guide for employers on using social media as a vetting tool

Share Button

Advice on social media vettingThe debate over the right to privacy of job applicants whose activities may be checked on social media websites such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter, has led to some confusion over what is legally acceptable. Employers’ body the CIPD’s recent social media research revealed that two in five employers look at candidates’ online activity or profiles to inform recruitment decisions, but few inform applicants as a matter of course that this is being done. But just how aware are employers of the legalities around this kind of vetting? Managers have wide discretion within the law to decide whether or not to recruit a particular candidate, but to avoid risk of legal challenge they should be fully aware of the law on data protection and discrimination in employment. The CIPD has now published some useful guidance on what constitutes good practice. More →

Benefits of social media for employers are not being realised says CIPD

Share Button

Benefits of social media for business relationships and employee engagementResearch launched today at the CIPD’s Social Media in HR conference reveals social media is still a long way off from infiltrating the workplace to the extent it is used in our social lives. Three in four (76%) use social media in their personal lives, but just one in four (26%) use it for work purposes. Given the news this week that the attorney general is to publish guidance on Twitter to help prevent social media users from committing contempt of court, employers could be forgiven in being wary of the risks of social media. This is a mistake, as according to the research, ‘Social technology, social business?’ almost half (47%) of employees who use social media for work on a daily basis already see real benefits for their organisations. More →

Generation X leads the world in embracing social media recruitment

Share Button

Generation X takes the lead in embracing social media recruitment

Nearly half (44%) of respondents to a new global survey on social media and workforce have been contacted about a job via social media over the past year. All generations of workers are taking part in this trend, with surprisingly Generation X (47%) just slightly in front of Gen Y and Baby Boomers (42%) in receiving job information via social networks. However the latest Kelly Global Workforce Index finds the UK lags behind many other European Countries, with just 40 per cent of UK respondents contacted through social media about an employment opportunity in the prior year, compared with 55 per cent in Germany and Poland, and 52 per cent in Ireland. More →

Technology fix. What employers can do when social media becomes an addiction

Share Button

Technology fix. What to do when social media become an addiction

Recent research shows that technology has helped us to become nearly five times more productive than we were in the 1970s. As well as enabling social interaction and personal expression, social media such as LinkedIn and Twitter can be valuable business aids for innovation and collaboration. However, with over half of people under 25 admitting they have to check Facebook at least once a day, it’s clear that for many, social media has become more than a form of virtual engagement. This can create something of an issue in the workplace, leaving employers with the dilemma of balancing the positive aspects of online communications while discouraging time wasting. More →

Translate >>