Search Results for: office design

Office design in the US now more closely aligned with needs of workers

Office design in the US now more closely aligned with needs of workers

office designOffice design and expectations around professionalism in the workplace are evolving along with the modern workforce in America, according to a new report from researchers at Olivet Nazarene University. The Modern Office Study claims that office design is evolving in parallel with changes in working culture, especially in the way that traditional North American cubicles, which were once the default model of office design in the US, are rapidly being replaced with open plan layouts. The report claims that these are now found in over half of American workplaces. More →

Human centric office design leads list of “trends” for next year

Human centric office design leads list of “trends” for next year

office design and natureAmbius has published its latest annual report (registration) which claims to highlight the top trends in office design for 2020 and beyond. It suggests that the new year will see a continued evolution in the understanding of the human-centric workplace with designs that improve employee performance and wellbeing, integrate innovative technologies, offer multi-functional capabilities, and facilitate an inspiring and engaging environment for top talent. More →

Office design can be a vehicle for equality and change

Office design can be a vehicle for equality and change

workplace design for inclusionThe way companies design physical environments is a direct reflection of their values and beliefs. Inequality is hardwired into the “standard” office layout, with perimeter offices and fixed desks offering limited settings for unstructured collaboration and recreation, further perpetuating the issue. Modern office design often favours extroversion and emphasises a hierarchy with values that benefit only a small portion of the overall workforce, contributing to organisation-wide imbalance. So how do we create more inclusive workplaces that can be leveraged as vehicles for change? More →

A synaesthetic approach to office design

A synaesthetic approach to office design

A colourful face to depict synaesthesia in office designSynaesthesia is a condition in which one type of sensory stimulus triggers an involuntary stimulus of another sense. Being able to hear colour or taste numbers might seem like a unique party piece, but some research indicates it’s an ability we’re all born with. More →

Fine tuning office design and its most wonderful invention to our needs

Fine tuning office design and its most wonderful invention to our needs

The best workplaces are always focused on people. Which is why many of the great pioneers of workplace thinking are from the social sciences, including disciplines such as psychology, ethnography and anthropology. These are the people who have shared the insights that help us to understand the characteristics of great office design. In particular, this relies on an awareness of the ways in which people interact in particular spaces. More →

How office design trends in different countries feed off each other

How office design trends in different countries feed off each other

The term Global Village has passed into general use to describe many of the phenomena we associate with the modern globalised world. But it actually dates back to 1962 when coined by Marshall McLuhan to describe an emerging, electronically contracted world in which cultures converge alongside political, business and legislative frameworks. These forces have been instrumental in bringing nations and organisations closer together and yet each nation continues to be shaped by little differences and residual cultures and conditions. More →

WeWork, false narratives and the superstate of office design

WeWork, false narratives and the superstate of office design

WeWork New YorkSo, WeWork then. As the dust settles on whatever has happened, some lessons may be emerging. Many of them are presented in this comment in The Economist and this piece in The Intelligencer in which Scott Galloway of NYU Business School claims that the problems have been evident for a long time. He doesn’t hold back. More →

Office design alone cannot motivate us or make us happy at work

Office design alone cannot motivate us or make us happy at work

Office design and happinessThere’s a good reason why we find it hard to establish the causal links between our working lives, office design and our personal happiness. It’s because it’s all very complicated. So complicated in fact that you can sidetrack any discussion on the subject by asking elementary questions such as: ‘what do you mean by happy?’ or ‘should it be the role of work to make us happy?’ More →

Office design hampers innovation claim workers

Office design hampers innovation claim workers

Nearly half of British employees (48 percent) don’t think the design of their workplace encourages innovation and creativity, an Oktra and YouGov survey claims. According to the report, 72 percent of employees would be more committed to or happier in a company if they felt inspired by its office design. More →

Office design has a role to play in reflecting neurological differences

Office design has a role to play in reflecting neurological differences

office design and neurodiversityIn recent years, we have seen a growing civil rights movement focused on change in the workplace and in terms of office design, revolving around differences in brain function. Advocates for neurodiversity say that it’s just as critical to business success as gender or racial diversity in the labour force. More →

The colour of magic in office design

The colour of magic in office design

In the Discworld series of novels, the author Terry Pratchett introduces us to the colour of magic. He calls it octarine, a sort of greenish purple, described as ‘the undisputed pigment of the imagination’. It’s all fanciful but, in fact, such unseeable colours exist for the human eye. They are seemingly invisible to us most of the time because of the limitations of our vision and not just because they exist outside of the usual visible spectrum. More →

Office design should take account of the quality of interactions as well as quantity

Office design should take account of the quality of interactions as well as quantity

People in the sort of office design that encourages communication and better working relationshipsEver since technology first made it possible for people to work remotely from their colleagues, there has been speculation not only that office design should change but even that the physical office could be dispensed with entirely, and with it the idea that people should come together to work in the same place at the same time to achieve common goals and to share in a common identity.

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