Search Results for: work-life balance

Majority of UK workers happy with work life balance, claims report

work life balanceA new report from private bank Investec claims that three quarters of the UK’s professionals working in fields such as law, finance and healthcare are happy with the current balance between their work and personal life. The survey of 2,000 people suggests that just a quarter (25 percent) claim to be unhappy with their work life balance and a third (32 percent) say that their friends and family would describe them as ‘workaholics’. However, a third (33 percent) are also confident of an improvement in their work life balance over the next five years even though the same proportion also claim that the past five years have seen it decline since 2010. Workers in London are most optimistic despite the fact they are most likely to see themselves as workaholics with nearly half (45 percent) feeling optimistic about the future state of their working and personal lives.

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Survey into UK culture of overwork highlights need for better worklife balance

UK culture of overwork highlights need for better worklife balance

A new study is published today which reveals how the UK’s long hour-culture is damaging family life, causing high stress levels, cutting time spent with loved ones and creating an inability to switch off from work. A survey of more than 1,000 working parents throughout the UK, commissioned by health cash plan provider Medicash, found that 83 per cent of working parents feel guilty about the amount of time they spend working, with 50 per cent saying it has a negative impact on relationships with their children, and almost half (45.9%), saying it caused problems in their relationship with their partner and caused them to neglect friends (25%).

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Global dissatisfaction with work life balance on the rise

Report finds increasing dissatisfaction with work-life balance

More than one in four employees (27 per cent) at organizations that are not perceived to support work-life balance plan to leave their companies within the next two years, according to new research from Hay Group. At the same time, work-life balance concerns across the globe are on the rise, with 39 per cent of employees indicating that they did not have a “good balance” between work and personal life, compared to only 32 per cent who reported the same in 2011. “Organizations across the globe continue to ask their employees to ‘do more with less’, leading to increasing dissatisfaction with work-life balance,” said Mark Royal, senior principal at Hay Group Insight.

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Workers feel more trusted and motivated thanks to hybrid working

Workers feel more trusted and motivated thanks to hybrid working

workersNew research from Kadence (formerly Chargifi) claims that after a year of flexible working, almost two-thirds of US and UK office workers (62 percent) now feel more trusted to do their job effectively. Of those workers, half also feel more motivated to do a better quality job (51 percent) and go the extra mile (48 percent) thanks to their new working arrangements. More →

Almost half of working mothers feel they are held back from promotion

Almost half of working mothers feel they are held back from promotion

workingNew polling, carried out to mark the start of National Work Life Week (Oct 11–15), highlights a wide gulf in how working mothers, parents and carers are managing to balance their work and home lives as we come out of the pandemic. Outdated cultures and practices still hold sway in many workplaces around the UK. More →

Hybrid workers retain concerns of discrimination, career and always on culture

Hybrid workers retain concerns of discrimination, career and always on culture

hybridPoly has released a new report outlining the evolution of the workplace and changing employee attitudes to the 9-5. The Poly Evolution of the Workplace report provides analysis on the findings of a survey of 7,261 hybrid workers from the UK, France, Germany, Spain, Sweden, Poland and the United Arab Emirates. It examines how attitudes and behaviours have evolved – looking at everything from working patterns and culture, to frustration and noise, right down to what we wear. More →

The underlying problems with the way we think about work

The underlying problems with the way we think about work

people and workAn idea that has never really gone away, but which seems to be enjoying a new lease of life is the tabula rasa. The conception of people as a blank slate is something a that has crept back into mainstream political and social thought for a variety of reasons. Arguably, it is also behind many of the most misleading notions about work and workplace design, perhaps most importantly that a change to some single element or characteristic of a working environment will lead to a specific outcome in the behaviour of people. More →

Majority of UK GPs report uptick in patients seeking help for work related stress

Majority of UK GPs report uptick in patients seeking help for work related stress

work related stressResearch from Perkbox, claims that 92 percent of UK GPs report an increase in people seeking medical advice for work related stress and anxiety since the pandemic began. What’s more, 68 percent of GPs surveyed agree they have seen a hike in patients seeking support for this over the past three months compared to the start of the pandemic, and 80 percent are preparing for levels to increase further, suggesting the worst is yet to come if action isn’t taken. More →

Developing a future of work strategy depends on asking the right questions

Developing a future of work strategy depends on asking the right questions

future of work strategyThe rapid changes to our working lives caused by the global pandemic have prompted a great deal of debate about the future of work, the workplace and corporate real estate generally. At the highest levels of management within many organisations, leaders are now reflecting on their experiences and asking searching questions about their ways of working. More →

Commuting has some mental and physical health benefits, claim researchers

Commuting has some mental and physical health benefits, claim researchers

commuters and commutingA new study from researchers at University College London claims that the journey to work has benefits for people’s mental health, fitness levels and work-life balance. According to the study into attitudes to commuting led by neuroscientist Joseph Devlin, around half of the 3,000 people surveyed said taking in the scenery by train was the ‘best part’ of heading into the while a quarter said it was the chance for ‘me time’, including reading, listening to podcast or catching up on emails. More →

More hybrid working to bring 3.8 million Brits into employment

More hybrid working to bring 3.8 million Brits into employment

hybrid workingHybrid working could bring nearly four million people “locked out” from work such as parents, carers and disabled people into the workforce and enable part-time workers to work more hours adding £48.3bn to the UK economy each year, according to a new study by Virgin Media O2 Business and the Centre for Economics and Business Research (Cebr). More →

Toxicity in the workplace experienced by seventy percent of UK employees

Toxicity in the workplace experienced by seventy percent of UK employees

ToxicityCulture in UK workplaces has come under scrutiny after a recent study claims that seven in ten (70 percent) Brits shared they’ve experienced toxicity in a working environment at some stage of their career. More →

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