Search Results for: data breach

Hybrid working opens door to greater risk of data breaches

Hybrid working opens door to greater risk of data breaches

hybrid working data breachesMore than eight in 10 (83 percent) UK businesses say hybrid working increases the risk of a data breach, yet over a fifth (22 percent) remain unprepared if it happens, ­­with speed of response the top concern. According to new research published within TransUnion’s Data Breach Support for Businesses ebook (registration), business leaders expect 43 percent of their workforce to be hybrid working in the coming year, splitting their time between the office and remote working. Yet this change to working practices means a far greater potential for devices and data to end up in the wrong hands. More →

Data breaches caused by phishing is a problem for most organisations now

Data breaches caused by phishing is a problem for most organisations now

phishing and data breachesEgress’ 2021 Insider Data Breach Survey claims that almost three-quarters (73 percent) of organisations have suffered data breaches caused by phishing attacks in the last year. Remote work has increased the risk, with over half (53 percent) of IT leaders reporting an increase in incidents caused by phishing. More →

Almost all organisations have suffered insider data breaches

Almost all organisations have suffered insider data breaches

data breachesEgress’ Insider Data Breach Survey 2021 claims that 94 percent of organisations have experienced insider data breaches in the last year. Human error was the top cause of serious incidents, according to 84 percent of IT leaders surveyed. More →

Firms doing too little to tackle employee data breaches

Firms doing too little to tackle employee data breaches

data breachesInsider data breaches are a major concern for 97 percent of IT leaders, according to new research. About three quarters believe that employees have put data at risk in the past 12 months accidentally (78 percent) or intentionally (75 percent). When asked about the implications of these breaches, more than two in five said financial damage would be the area of greatest impact. More →

Businesses lost an estimated £20.2 bn from data breaches last year

Businesses lost an estimated £20.2 bn from data breaches last year

Hackers stole or compromised an estimated £20.2bn worth of records from businesses in 2017, new research claims. After news that Uber failed to disclose a massive hack in 2016, VPN (Virtual Private Network) comparison site BestVPN.com analysed more than 200 data breaches dating back to 2004, looking at the number of records compromised, the industries most likely to be affected and the value of those breaches. Late last year Equifax became the victim of one of the most high profile hacks in history, with 143m records stolen, equating to an estimated £15bn worth of data lost*. While there have previously been attacks where more records were compromised, such as Yahoo’s 1bn back in December 2016, the Equifax breach was notable because the data stolen included social Security numbers and personal identification. IBM revealed in its Cost of a Data Breach Study 2017 that the average cost of a stolen record was £104.25, or £2.7m per hack.

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Quarter of employees say they have experienced a data security breach

Quarter of employees say they have experienced a data security breach

New research by 247meeting claims to have uncovered worrying lapses in data security in the workplace, with senior management often being the biggest culprits. According to the report: a quarter of senior managers have experienced a stranger on a conference call; 26 percent of employees with access to customer data haven’t been trained on GDPR; over a third of employees don’t know where their security policy is saved; and almost half of employees admit to using technology tools to communicate at work without them being password protected

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Over a third of IT leaders state their remote workers have knowingly put corporate data at risk

Over a third of IT leaders state their remote workers have knowingly put corporate data at risk

remote workersMore than a third (35 percent) of UK IT decision makers admitted that their remote workers have already knowingly put corporate data at risk of a breach in the last year according to an annual survey – conducted by Apricorn. This is concerning given that over one in ten surveyed IT decision makers also noted that they either have no control over where company data goes or where it is stored (15 percent) and their technology does not support secure mobile/remote working (12 percent). More →

Working from home opens up new data security threat

Working from home opens up new data security threat

working from home securityA new report from Tessian claims that nearly half of employees (48 percent) are less likely to follow safe data practices when working from home. The State of Data Loss Prevention 2020 report suggests that the global shift to remote working poses new security challenges for businesses and why traditional security solutions are failing to curb the problem of the insider threat and accidental data loss. More →

Cyber security fears as employees and ex staff able to access sensitive company data

Cyber security fears as employees and ex staff able to access sensitive company data

Cyber security fears as office workers given unfettered access to sensitive company dataHuge numbers of employees have or have had access to mission critical company systems which should be reserved only for staff that require it, claims a new study by CyberArk. Specifically, it found that almost half (48 percent) of employees have or have had access to sensitive financial documents; 46 percent to confidential HR information; nearly a third (29 percent) have or have had direct access to company bank account and over a third (37 percent) access to research and development plans or blueprints for new products/services. Credential theft remains the most common and effective route to a successful cyber-attack.

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Majority of employees see digital data as way of being snooped on by their boss

Majority of employees see digital data as way of being snooped on by their boss

Majority of employees see digital data as way of being snooped on by their bossAs we recently reported, facilities management is more data driven than ever, with the use of data analytics being used to measure costs and performance. This is why the increasingly sophisticated ways in which workplaces can be monitored; from the footfall in the washrooms to the level of desk usage has been welcomed by employers, but a new survey suggests digital data gathering is making staff feel uneasy. A new report published today by the TUC looks at the phenomenon from the perspective of workers’ experiences and found that 6 in 10 workers fear that greater workplace surveillance through technology will fuel distrust. The study reveals that most UK workers (56 percent) believe they are currently monitored by their boss at work and worry that this ‘surveillance data’ will be used by bosses to set unfair targets, micromanage them and take away control and autonomy.

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Younger employees are main source of workplace security breaches

Younger employees are main source of workplace security breaches

More than a third of senior executives believe that younger employees are the “main culprits” for workplace security breaches according to a new study into attitudes to security of the workforce, commissioned by Centrify. The study also claims that these same decision makers are doing very little to allay their own fears with over a third of 18-24 year olds able to access any files on their company network and only one in five having to request permission to access specific files. Less than half (43 percent) have access only to the files that are relevant to their work. The study, conducted by Censuswide, sought the views of 1,000 younger workers (18-24 year olds) and 500 decision makers in UK organisations to discover how security, privacy and online behaviour at work impacts the lives of younger employees and the companies that they work for.

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Companies overlooking cost of cyber risks as variety and number of breaches increase

Companies are overlooking cost of cyber risks as incidents of breaches riseCyber risk is becoming increasingly common while the types of breaches are becoming more diverse, claims a new white paper by the audit and accounting expert BDO. For instance, ransomware is now the fifth most common type of malware; with the cost of freeing up computer systems from ransomware tripling since 2016. Yet organisations are continuing to spend up to four times more on insuring other company assets (e.g. property, equipment etc.) than on cyber insurance, despite an increasingly widespread belief that their cyber assets are in fact up to 14 percent more valuable. The report also finds that as cyber incidents increase, they become more difficult – and therefore more expensive – to defend. In the new cyber insurance white paper, BDO’s global cybersecurity leadership group stresses the importance of businesses gaining an understanding of their unique risk profiles in order to ensure the right cyber insurance for their needs. Cyber insurance: managing the risk does include some of the positive trends around cyber security – for example, both the level of Board involvement and investments in cybersecurity have increased significantly in the last 2-3 years.

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