Search Results for: automation

Some regions are better prepared for the rise of automation than others

Some regions are better prepared for the rise of automation than others

Concerted action is needed from national and local politicians, businesses and education providers to improve educational opportunities in all cities, from early years to schools and adult learning. This is according to a major report from the think tank Centre for Cities. It examines how automation and globalisation are transforming the skills needed to thrive in the workplace, and the extent to which people in English cities are gaining these skills. The report claimsthat interpersonal and analytical skills – such as negotiation and critical thinking – are increasingly important for current and future workers, as manual and physical jobs are particularly under threat from automation and globalisation.

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Leaders need to rethink work to get the most out of AI and automation

Leaders need to rethink work to get the most out of AI and automation

Leaders need new tools to increase automation in their organisations, says Ravin Jesuthasan, Managing Director at Willis Towers Watson, in a new book. Reinventing Jobs: a 4-step approach for applying automation to work, co-authored with John Boudreau, presents a four-step framework to give leaders a systematic process for applying new automation to work, supported by dozens of case studies from around the world.

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Over a third of workers are anxious about the impact of automation

Over a third of workers are anxious about the impact of automation

Over a third of workers are anxious about the impact of automationA significant number (37 per cent) of workers (11 million people) in the UK worry their job will change for the worse and 23 per cent (7 million people) are concerned that their current job may no longer be needed, claims a survey into the impact of automation over the next decade. In the survey, carried out to mark the launch of a new Commission on Workers and Technology chaired by Yvette Cooper MP, workers were 73 per cent confident they can adapt to technological change and update their skill if automation affects their job and over half think (53 per cent) are optimistic that technology change will be good for their working lives. More →

Artificial intelligence, robots and automation set to transform the office environment

Artificial intelligence, robots and automation set to transform the office environment

In today’s highly digital landscape, tools like AI and machine learning were developed to significantly improve productivity in the workplace. But despite their existence, many companies still trail behind in terms of integrating AI in their office environments. In fact, an article on Workplace Insight previously noted that over a quarter of employers fail to provide staff with digital and flexible tools. Though it is predicted that the next couple of years will see businesses adapt to a human-and-machine environment, organisations still have a lot of catching up to do in terms of digital basics.

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Majority of US employers say they will increase or maintain headcount due to automation

Majority of US employers say they will increase or maintain headcount due to automation

Majority of US employers say they will increase or maintain headcount due to automationCompanies will need more, not less people, in the near-term to meet the demand stimulated by automation, claims a new report from ManpowerGroup. The report – Robots Need Not Apply: Human Solutions in the Skills, found that 91 percent of employers in the US will maintain or increase headcount in the next two to three years as industries shift to more advanced, automated processes. The report provides a real-time view of the impact of automation on headcount, the functions most affected and the soft skills that are both of greatest value and hardest to find. Frontline and Customer-Facing functions anticipate the most growth as organisations place higher value on customer service and human interaction. Manufacturing and Production functions are close behind. Back-office functions that are routine or add less value to customer interactions are under greatest threat as organisations implement new technology to drive efficiency. In this Skills Revolution the best blend of high-tech and high-touch will be the combination of human strengths with technical and digital know-how: 61 percent of companies say communication skills, written and verbal, are their most valued soft skill followed by customer service, collaboration and problem-solving.

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British employers are failing to prepare staff for automation

British employers are failing to prepare staff for automation

UK employees aren’t being equipped with the skills required by an automated workplace, according to a new study from ADP. The findings suggest that despite a third (32 percent) of workers believing their job will be automated within 10 years and one in ten (10 percent) predicting it will happen in two, half of those affected (49 percent) say their employer isn’t preparing to train or reskill them for the new world of work. ADP surveyed 1,300 UK working adults across the country as part of The Workforce View in Europe 2018, which gives a snapshot of employees’ views about their jobs, workplace and career plans. The report claims that thousands of workers are worried about the prospect of mass automation and how this will impact their own career prospects if they aren’t prepared with the right skills.

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Employees demand more, not less automation in the workplace

Employees demand more, not less automation in the workplace

Employees demand more, not less automation in the workplaceOver half (52 percent) of workers in a new poll have admitted looking for a new job because of frustrations over what they see as outdated ways of thinking around work practices and automation at their current company. The Digital Work Report 2018 commissioned by Wrike, surveyed just over 3,000 workers from across the UK, France and Germany, and highlighted a number of perceived benefits around automation, but its findings suggest that calls for greater adoption by employees are not being taken seriously. Nearly half of those surveyed (45 percent) in the UK believe automation would give their company a competitive advantage. However, while 39 percent are considering automation tools for some of their job functions, just 4 percent of UK companies have an automation strategy (i.e. planning to implement tools/techniques within next 12-24 months) for the whole company – considerably lower than European counterparts in Germany and France (both at 8 percent).

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Automation will lead to greater inequality rather than job losses

Automation will lead to greater inequality rather than job losses

The total level of wages associated with jobs that have the technical potential to be automated in the UK is £290 billion per year, which represents 33 percent of all wages and earnings from labour in the economy, according to a new report published by IPPR  for the IPPR Commission on Economic Justice. The report further claims that low-wage jobs have more potential to be automated than high-wage jobs and so it’s not just automation’s impact on the number of jobs that need to be considered but the impact on inequality. If automation leads to lower average wages or working hours, or loss of jobs in aggregate, a significant amount of national income could be transferred from wages to profits. And while increased automation of activities will replace some workers and labour earnings, employment and wages will rise in other areas of the labour market due to higher output and productivity, offsetting some of the original £290 billion lost but increasing pay inequality.

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The patchy outcomes of automation could compound Britain’s North/South divide

The patchy outcomes of automation could compound Britain’s North/South divide

The patchy effects of automation and artificial intelligence could compound the economic differences between the UK’s cities, according to a new report from the Centre for Cities. It concludes that while automation will boost jobs in British cities over the coming decades, it will also deepen economic and political divisions across the country, with Northern and Midlands cities more exposed to job losses than cities in the South. The report claims that 1 in 5 existing jobs in British cities are likely to be displaced by 2030 as a result of automation and globalisation – amounting to 3.6 million jobs in total – with retail occupations, customer service roles and warehouse jobs among those most at threat. Significantly, however, this risk is not spread evenly across the country, with struggling cities in the North and Midlands more exposed to job losses than wealthier cities in the South. Around 18 percent of jobs are under threat in Southern cities, compared to 23 percent in cities elsewhere in the country.

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Global economy faces an immediate reskilling problem in the face of automation, claims Davos report

Global economy faces an immediate reskilling problem in the face of automation, claims Davos report

The global economy faces a reskilling crisis with 1.4 million jobs in the US alone vulnerable to disruption from technology and other factors by 2026, according to a new report, Towards a Reskilling Revolution: A Future of Jobs for All, published by the World Economic Forum. The report is an analysis of nearly 1,000 job types across the US economy, encompassing 96 percent of employment in the country. Its aim is to assess the scale of the reskilling task required to protect workforces from an expected wave of automation brought on by the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’. Drawing on this data for the US economy, the report finds that 57 percent of jobs expected to be disrupted belong to women. If called on today to move to another job with skills that match their own, 16 percent of workers would have no opportunities to transition and another 25 percent would have only between one and three matches.

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Automation will impact low paid jobs first because of the living wage, report claims

Automation will impact low paid jobs first because of the living wage, report claims

The development of the living wage coupled with the growing automation of tasks could create a perfect storm that prices a growing number of people out of the jobs markets, a report from the Institute of Fiscal Studies claims. The authors suggest that one of the unintended consequences of the increase of the rate to £8.50 by 2020 could be that people in low paid work could find themselves in competition for jobs with robots and artificial intelligence. The report concludes that there will be a tipping point at which human labour becomes economically unviable, although it does not predict when that will occur.

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Automation will benefit the economy but many people could lose out

Automation will benefit the economy but many people could lose out

Around a third of all jobs in the UK are vulnerable to the introduction of robots, automation and artificial intelligence and the government must intervene to manage the transition and stop new technology driving up wage inequality, a report from the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) claims. Although the report suggests that the tech will have a generally beneficial impact on the economy, it warns that lower-skilled jobs are far more likely to be phased out over the coming decades, and only higher-skilled workers would generally be able to command higher wages.

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