Search Results for: coworking

Small flexible workspace operators are biggest winners as trend for coworking continues to grow

Small flexible workspace operators are biggest winners as trend for coworking continues to grow

While the likes of WeWork have dominated the headlines over the past year, the number of smaller, more niche coworking operators, has grown significantly and now makes up 83 percent of the total flexible workspace market. The latest research from The Instant Group, which claims to be the world’s largest flexible workspace provider, suggests that the number of centres in the market run by smaller independent operators has grown to 83 percent of the London market. The increase of 20+ desk enquiries is evidence of growing demand as larger firms have started exploring flexible options rather than taking more conventional leases.

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Coworking is breaking away from its cultural and geographical stereotypes

Coworking is breaking away from its cultural and geographical stereotypes

There is a persistent image of a coworking space as a sort of glorified serviced office for tech and creative startups who can’t afford the eye-watering rents in the areas they need to be. This is usually in the technology hothouses of the world’s major cities where they can work alongside the corporate giants and fellow innovators that thrive there. The reason such perceptions exist is because they are largely true. It’s no coincidence that coworking spaces have thrived up till now in the world’s most expensive property markets – in London, Hong Kong and New York, serving exactly the sorts of start-ups and freelancers who rely on proximity to their potential clients.

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Over half of employees say remote working and coworking increase their productivity

Over half of employees say remote working and coworking increase their productivity

coworkingMore than half of US based employees (54 percent) with the chance to work remotely say they are most productive when they work outside a traditional office environment, such as at home, in a coffee shop, or in a coworking space, according to a new survey by research firm Clutch. Over two-thirds (68 percent) of workers surveyed work in a traditional office. However, higher productivity isn’t the only reason employees prefer other workspace options. Over a quarter (26 percent) of employees who have some degree of flexibility say a better work-life balance is the top benefit of working outside the office. Other benefits include flexible work hours (21 percent) and fewer distractions (18 percent).

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Are these the UK’s best coworking spaces?

Are these the UK’s best coworking spaces?

IPSE, the Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-Employed, has announced the 12 longlisted finalists for the 2018 Coworking Space of the Year award. The award has been launched to recognise the role coworking spaces play in ‘creating a nurturing, inclusive and stimulating environment for the UK’s thriving 4.8 million-strong self-employed workforce;. The venues were judged on a range of criteria including the quality of facilities and staff, the innovation, creativity and distinctiveness of their venue, the passion and commitment to their members and the freelancing community, and the price and value of its membership packages. Intriguingly, only one is in London.

 

 

 

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Coworking trends are influencing design and layout of central London offices

Coworking trends are influencing design and layout of central London offices

Coworking trends are influencing design and layout of central London offices

The rise of coworking and flexible working are affecting the design and layout of central London offices, with many traditional offices being given makeovers to reflect current trends in wellness and connectivity. And according to Cluttons’ Central London Office Market Outlook for Spring 2018, the Central London office market continues to experience a comparatively low vacancy rate – currently standing at 5.9 percent percent well below the 15 year average of just under 8 percent, which is more or less the same following Brexit in mid 2016. In comparison, following the peak of the last cycle at the end of 2007, the overall vacancy rate in Central London moved out from 7 percent to an average of 8.2 percent in the following two years. Landlords have been generally far more responsive to the recent downturn than in previous cycles; not only in relation to rent but also lease flexibility, together with a willingness to cap service charges and dilapidations with older style buildings. Alongside this, the volume of flexible office space in London rose by 20 percent last year as smaller firms move into serviced or managed offices.

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Flexible working and the rise of coworking reducing demand for London office space

Flexible working and the rise of coworking reducing demand for London office space

The number of new office buildings constructed since the financial crisis in 2008 has fallen in a year on year comparison by 56 percent, according to an analysis of planning applications carried out by property lending platform Lendy. The authors claim that the primary reason for the sharp decrease has been the greater uptake of flexible working and coworking models of space use. According to the study, only 2,300 applications to build new office buildings were approved last year, down from 5,200 in 2007/8. Lendy adds that applications to build new offices have also fallen since the financial crisis – down 58 percent to 2,500 last year from 6,000 in 2007/08.  Flexible working has reduced the requirement for new office buildings. Other innovations, such as shared workspace and coworking, have reduced the need for employees to have their own dedicated workspace, according to the report.

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About time we simply accepted that coworking and flexible working are the new normal

About time we simply accepted that coworking and flexible working are the new normal

Ask someone to list innovative companies which have become notable disruptors in their market and they invariably respond with two names – Uber and Airbnb. That is because both brands are positioned squarely and successfully at the retail consumer: for people who use a taxi or take an occasional short break in a foreign city, they have become the automatic default options. But there is another equally successful business targeting the corporate space, aimed particularly at small businesses and millennial tech start-ups: WeWork. Just like Uber and Airbnb, it is less than a decade old. In that time, WeWork’s ambition of being the world’s leading coworking company has been realised. Championing itself as a disruption revolutionary, it has succeeded more prosaically by ‘creating environments that increase productivity, innovation, and collaboration,’ according to its website. WeWork’s model involves renting office space cheaply via long-term lease contracts. Small units are then re-rented at higher rates to start up companies which are happy to pay a premium because they need very little space.

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SMEs spend more time searching for private offices than coworking space

SMEs spend more time searching for private offices than coworking space

Second Home coworkingSearches for private offices have become more popular than coworking space among SMEs over the past year, according to new data from commercial property marketplace Hubble. The firm reports that this marks a reversal from the previous year’s results, although searches for coworking space remain disproportionately high compared to the overall office market. According to Hubble, searches for private offices grew an average of 40 percent month-on-month from January 2017 to January 2018, with 43 percent more searches being made for private offices over coworking space, and searches for the category ‘private office’ comprising 62 percent of all searches on the Hubble platform.

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Flexible and coworking offices to account for ten percent of UK property market by 2027

Flexible and coworking offices to account for ten percent of UK property market by 2027

Demand for flexible workspace including coworking space soared across the UK during 2017, according to a report from Cushman & Wakefield. The study of the rapidly growing market also claims that WeWork is already the largest single corporate occupier of office space in London, with only the public sector exceeding its scale. In addition, the report also claims that WeWork has taken up more space in London’s key commercial property districts than any other occupier since 2012. According to the report, WeWork has taken up more than twice as much space as Google, which leased 1.3m sq ft over the five-year period, while Amazon and Deutsche Bank leased just over 1 m sq ft and 0.9 m sq ft.

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European commercial property market in good health as coworking phenomenon takes hold

European commercial property market in good health as coworking phenomenon takes hold

European commercial property markets have started 2018 in a positive way, with provisional data for 2017 from Knight Frank suggesting that investment volumes were higher than in 2016. If 2017 beats 2016’s total of €216 billion it will still remain well below the market peak of 2015 when over €250 billion was invested, according to the latest commercial property outlook report from Knight Frank. The real estate firm expects 2018 transaction volumes to be similar to those of 2017 and the report says that significant amounts of capital continue will be allocated to real estate.  The report also highlights how flexible workspace and coworking is now a Europe-wide phenomenon, with London, Berlin and Paris witnessing the strongest growth. The sector will continue to expand, as new styles of workspace are developed to service a growing variety of occupier needs, says the report. Last year Baptiste Broughton reported for us on the state of the coworking market in France.

Serviced offices and coworking spaces boom in Manchester in response to growing customer demand

Serviced offices and coworking spaces boom in Manchester in response to growing customer demand

Rising demand from businesses for flexible working space has sparked a boom in the provision of coworking spaces serviced offices in Manchester in 2017, according to the latest office market snapshot by real estate advisors Colliers International. The report showed serviced office providers addressed the need for flexible working from small and growing operators by taking in excess of 100,000 sq ft of space in Manchester in the first three quarters of 2017. Major developments included global co-working specialist WeWork following the opening of its first office outside London at No 1 Spinningfields by adding another 44,000 sq ft at One St Peter’s Square and property developer Allied London launching its own co-working brand All Work & Social to operate alongside WeWork at Spinningfields.

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Review: ushering in a new era for the coworking phenomenon

Review: ushering in a new era for the coworking phenomenon 0

Ramon Suarez has produced a very practical book, based on his own experience as one of the pioneers of coworking. And let’s be clear – it is coworking (not “co-working”; there is no hyphen), as Suarez explains, “a coworker (a member of a coworking space) is not the same as a co-worker (somebody who happens to work for the same company or in your same office)”. On his business card, Suarez describes his role as “Serendipity Accelerator”- you will understand that if you read the book. Suarez differentiates coworking from its many (and mostly false) aliases. Shared offices may be collaborative, but do not provide the network of people found in a good coworking space. Networked offices, where more than one company shares space and may collaborate, “come close” to coworking. Hacker & Maker spaces, Accelerators, Incubators and Cafes are similarly differentiated.

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