Search Results for: retention

Employers get flexible as retirement age for baby boomers draws closer

Employers get flexible as retirement age for baby boomers draws closer 0

RetireNearly three quarters (74 percent) of finance directors are concerned that the skills gap resulting from widespread retirement of baby boomers will have a negative impact on their organisation over the next two years and an even higher proportion (77 percent) say that the departure of older workers will have a negative impact over the next five years. The new research from Robert Half UK reveals that UK employers are anticipating a significant skills gap when baby boomers retire over the next two to five years and are already taking steps to mitigate the risk.  Baby boomers represent a bulge in the workforce that will soon be at retirement age so not only will employers need to consider the impact of the skills shortage that this mass-departure will create, but they will also have to accommodate different demands and expectations from younger Generation X and Y workers coming to replace them.

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UK productivity undermined by rule-heavy workplaces, claims report

UK productivity undermined by rule-heavy workplaces, claims report 0

CaptureEmployers can unleash the productivity of their workers by allowing them more scope to use their initiative, create more stimulating work and reduce the burden of unnecessary rules and procedures, according to a new report which considers productivity from the employees’ perspective. The latest Employee Outlook Survey from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), surveyed over 2,000 UK employees, asking what enabled them to be most productive. The most common responses were interesting work (40 percent), being able to use their own initiative (39 percent) and being given tasks which complement their skills (25 percent). On the other hand, the most common hurdles to employee productivity were unnecessary rules and procedures (28 percent), not having the resources available to do their jobs (28 percent) and office politics (24 percent).

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Firms use workplace improvements to invest in their human capital

Firms use workplace improvements to invest in their human capital 0

peopleA survey by CoreNet Global and Cushman & Wakefield claims that 88 percent of EMEA corporate real estate professionals are actively investing in workplace improvements, and 95 percent are addressing workplace technology as part of those upgrades. The results emphasise the importance of human capital, suggesting that factors such as office environment, flexible working and company culture continue to be seen as critical to attracting and retaining talent. The global Talent Agenda Survey, completed by 250 respondents, addresses how occupiers are managing their talent pool against an ever-changing and unpredictable business environment. The survey focused on categories such as the cost of human capital and its value; the key challenges relating to talent access, assembly and retention and the critical role that real estate plays in workplace innovation, efficiency and talent retention.

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UK firms turn to flexible working and wellbeing to bridge productivity gap

UK firms turn to flexible working and wellbeing to bridge productivity gap 0

flexible working womanIt’s not just larger organisations and governments that are having to grapple with the UK’s persistent ‘productivity puzzle’ but also smaller businesses who are increasingly turning to flexible working and other people centric initiatives to address the problem. That is one of the main findings of a new report from trade association Group Risk Development (GRiD).  According to their survey, nearly a quarter of employers (23 percent) believe productivity is an issue facing their business.  According to the office for National Statistics (ONS) this is a common problem across the entire UK economy as output per hour is stubbornly around 20 percent below the average for all G7 economies. This is the widest gap ever recorded and, according to GRiD is driving employers to seek ways of addressing their own shortfall with flexible working and wellbeing initiatives as well as investment in new equipment and technology.

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Shrinking Asian workplace density could impair business performance

Shrinking Asian workplace density could impair business performance 0

Space utilisation in AsiaWorkplace static density, i.e. the space per sq. ft. per workstation, has halved in many Asian markets over the last decade and in many parts of Asia, this has already reached a point where further reductions will impact productivity, performance and retention. In Hong Kong, India and China, workplace space has shrunk from 100 sq. ft. per desk to 50-60 sq. ft. per desk. This figure is nearly half that of Europe and the US, where density norms are around 150-200 sq. ft. per desk. Elsewhere, in Australia and New Zealand, standards remain more generous at around 90-150 sq. ft. per desk. CBRE’s recent report, Space Utilization: The Next Frontier, looks at how organizations across the region are now under pressure to drive down costs by increasing their workplace ‘static density’ and suggests ways in which companies can use workplace density and utilization data to drive efficiency and business performance.

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Majority of US workers keep relationship with boss strictly professional

Majority of US workers keep relationship with boss strictly professional 0

Majority of US workers keep relationship with boss strictly professionalNearly three-fourths (74 percent) of US employees consider their relationship with their boss to be excellent or good. However, for many employees, that relationship does not extend out of the office. According to staffing company Spherion’s “WorkSphere” survey, American workers who have a boss are split on whether they consider him or her a friend — 49 percent say yes, while 51 percent say no. And, while 82 percent of employees who have a boss report socializing with him or her during work hours or at work-related events, fewer than half of these workers (46 percent) ever see their boss outside of the office, and 41 percent consider their relationship exclusively professional. However, nearly one in five (18 percent) are connected on their personal social media channels; with nearly twice as many workers ages 18-44 (23 percent) engaging with their bosses in this manner than workers ages 45-54 (12 percent).

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Employers admit to an ad-hoc approach to flexible working practices

Employers admit to an ad-hoc approach to flexible working practices 0

Flexible attitudes to flexible working practicesOrganisations tend to take a flexible approach to the provision of flexible working a new global report into agile working trends claims. According to a study by WorldatWork and FlexJobs, while the majority of companies surveyed (80 percent) offer flexible work to employees, only 37 percent have a formal, written philosophy or policy to support employee flexibility options. From 2011 to 2015, flexibility programs have varied according to the type of programme offered and the organization’s demographics, industry and culture, with the most prevalent flexibility programmes being telework days on an ad-hoc basis, flex time and compressed workweeks. And according to the data, mastering a culture of workplace flexibility is not something that organizations do on the first or even second try. It’s an evolutionary process that occurs as employees tap into what they need to achieve work-life effectiveness.

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Majority of workers go into the workplace when they should be off sick

Majority of workers go into the workplace when they should be off sick 0

Majority of workers go into the workplace when they should be off sick

Debates around presenteeism tend to revolve around staff checking their emails while on holiday, but another potentially more destructive behaviour is that of the worker who reckons they’re so indispensable they insist on coming into the workplace when they’re ill. In a recent survey, 89 percent of workers said they had gone into work when they were not well, which is why it is hardly surprising that almost three quarters (71 percent) of employees have reported catching an illness from a sick colleague. According to the research by Canada Life, almost a third (32 percent) said their workload was too great for them to take time off for illness, and 80 percent would not take time off for stress-related illnesses. Employees were also worried about being perceived as lazy (13 percent), inconsiderate (10 percent) and weak (10 percent) if they took time off for a short-term illness.

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Employees exhausted by a culture of continuous change at work

Employees exhausted by a culture of continuous change at work 0

Employees exhausted by culture of continuous change at work A culture of continuous change may be standard practice within larger organisations, but it can have a negative effect on employees, a new report claims. The seven-country Liquid Change Survey of senior executives at large corporations, commissioned by Ketchum Change, found that some leaders are unaware of the effects of so-called change fatigue, despite their employees struggle to keep up. Among partners and board-level executives, only 28 percent think change fatigue is highly prevalent. The survey suggests that to succeed in an environment of continuous change, a more collaborative approach must replace the old top-downmodel. Outlining a clear strategy and goals (43 percent) and engaging with leaders across the organization to co-create the new environment (41 percent) were cited as the most effective ways to get leaders to believe in and actively lead through change.

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We need to do more than pay lip service to workplace wellbeing

We need to do more than pay lip service to workplace wellbeing 0

BlakeEnvelopes-WorkSpace1Too many companies continue to talk about employees as their ‘greatest asset’ yet their fine words are not always not borne out in their behaviour, be that through working culture, remuneration or environment. With more and more investors using employee wellness and engagement as a barometer for the health, stability and culture of the business – the concept of workplace wellbeing is finally garnering the attention it deserves. Our workplace behaviours, cultures and environments are not keeping us fit, well, productive, happy or profitable. Finally businesses are accepting their moral responsibility to take better care of their people. So what affects employee productivity, creativity and happiness and how can changes to the workplace promote the best financial and moral outcomes for businesses and employees alike?

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Flexible working now an almost universal employee benefit, claims study

Flexible working now an almost universal employee benefit, claims study 0

flexible workingA new report from employee benefits provider Unum claims to set out the future trends and challenges affecting the benefits packages firms should offer staff. One of the headline claims from the report is that four out of five employers (79 percent) already offer flexible working. ‘The Future of Employee Benefits’ report surveyed 13 organisations and incorporated the results with those of a series of interviews and roundtable discussions with employers and specialists including representatives from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. The report identifies a series of macro trends affecting workplace wellbeing and the recruitment and retention of employees over the next 15 years, which were categorised into four distinct working environments: The Ageless Workplace; The Mindful Workplace; The Intuitive Workplace; and The Collaborative Workplace.

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London is leading the way in the global coworking revolution

London is leading the way in the global coworking revolution 0

WeWork MoorgateChanging attitudes amongst occupiers towards office space and the explosion in the numbers of freelance workers and microbusinesses are driving an upsurge in coworking and other flexible working environments worldwide. That is the key conclusion of a new report from DTZ which claims that the number of dedicated flexible working locations worldwide is likely to hit 50,000 over the next three years, with parts of London leading the way. We reported recently how coworking pioneer WeWork has already announced its plans to dominate London’s commercial property scene in the same way it already does Manhattan’s. Now, the How You Work report from DTZ suggests that this is the shape of things to come for many cities, with London leading the way alongside a tranche of global tech and creative centres such as New York, Berlin and Shanghai.

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