Search Results for: Mark Eltringham

It’s just life now: Debra Ward in conversation with Mark Eltringham

It’s just life now: Debra Ward in conversation with Mark Eltringham

There is currently a great deal of talk about the way people experience the workplace. It is a subject linked to the changing nature of work but also a growing awareness that the old demarcations of time and place are falling, and with them the demarcations between the workplace professions.  This subject may be topical but it has been a long term preoccupation for today’s guest on the podcast Debra Ward. Earlier this year Debra joined JLL in the new role of Strategy & Growth Director and one of her first aims has been to focus on the firm’s approach to human experience. This is encapsulated in a major global report on the subject but it’s one that Debra has always championed in here previous roles with MITIE, Macro and Condeco.  Debra is forthright, informed, bright and passionate. Everything you need in a podcast in fact.

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Where to have great ideas + Workplace professions + London’s office market

Where to have great ideas + Workplace professions + London’s office market 0

Insight_twitter_logo_2In this week’s newsletter; Giuseppe Boscherini explores the growing importance of creativity at work; Mark Eltringham argues that the three professions of the workplace, HR, IT and FM need to adapt and notes a growing disconnect between a firm’s earnings and the number of people it employs. In commercial property, demand for office space in London continues to overwhelm its availability, with English regions outside the Capital leading construction growth.  High job demands, stress and job insecurity are among the main reasons why people go to work when they are ill, and data shows the Internet of things will connect 6.4 billion objects next year. You can also download the new issue of Work&Place and access our first Insight Briefing, produced in partnership with Connection, which looks at agile working in the public sector. Visit our new events page, follow us on Twitter and join our LinkedIn Group to discuss these and other stories.

Landmark buildings can lead to an identity crisis for tenants

A new generation of landmarks

A new generation of landmarks

Companies want to brand themselves in lots of ways and for lots of reasons. There are all the usual reasons to do with marketing but when companies talk about brand and how it is integrated with architecture and the design of their offices they are equally likely to be concerned with attracting staff and making what they think are the right statements about their business. The problem is that while nearly everybody wants to brand their workplace, the design solutions can become overly literal. There’s nothing inherently wrong with logos in the carpet but successful design will be about far more than that. It usually has to be rather less literal and rather more intelligent.

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The ethics of AI, liveable cities, unf*cking work and how the office needs to be more like your home…

The ethics of AI, liveable cities, unf*cking work and how the office needs to be more like your home…

The cover of IN Magazine 12 featuring a woman working in a private booth in an officeIN13 is in production but you can see the digital edition of issue 12 of IN Magazine here. It continues to explore the most up to date topics for workplace managers and executives. Including: a look at the reality of liveable cities; why offices now need to offer people more privacy, peace and quiet; how firms need to address the challenges of the circular economy; a case study from the dynamic city of Ljubljana; David Sharp on the ethics of AI; Chelsea Perino on hybrid working; a critical review of Neil Usher’s new book; Marie Puybaraud of JLL in conversation; and much more. All back issues of IN can be found here. And why not check out Works Magazine and Work&Place Journal too. More →

Podcast: the weak arguments in favour of offices and the problem with the future of work

Podcast: the weak arguments in favour of offices and the problem with the future of work

future of work and real estateMark Eltringham the publisher of Workplace Insight and IN Magazine recently joined Caleb Parker, the founder of Bold, on his Work Bold podcast for an unscripted chat on: the future of work and how it may shape the future of commercial real estate; the reasons why anybody might ever want to go back to an office to work; the problem with weak arguments both for and against offices; and the importance of culture and flexibility rather than fixed times and places of work in determining people’s day to day experiences of work. The prompt for this conversation was the occasional discussion on social media over the past couple of years and a recent article exploring the value of weak tiesMore →

Announcing Works: a magazine for, about, and by the workplace design community

Announcing Works: a magazine for, about, and by the workplace design community

Works magazineWelcome to the new magazine for the workplace interiors community. Works is about the workplace industry, for the workplace industry and by the workplace industry – as you will see from this pilot issue. We want to reconnect this thriving sector (the workplace ain’t dead, baby!). More →

Do organisations actually know what their people do?

Do organisations actually know what their people do?

Do organisations truly understand how their people work? A big question that needed some unpacking and was explored at a recent Workplace Evolutionaries event, led by Tim Allen and Mark Eltringham. This is raw audio from the event so includes a brief chat about dogs and some other stuff. More →

Workplace Geeks podcast: Space for thought, with Jeremy Myerson

Workplace Geeks podcast: Space for thought, with Jeremy Myerson

workplace Jeremy MyersonIn this new episode of Workplace Geeks, Chris and Ian talk to WORKTECH Academy director, author and activist, professor emeritus Jeremy Myerson, about his award-winning research, ‘Space for thought: designing for knowledge workers’. The paper was co-authored with lead-researcher Catherine Greene back in 2011, and the findings are arguably even more relevant now in the aftermath of the pandemic, as many organisations grapple to unlock suitable alternative working arrangements for their diverse knowledge workers’ needs. More →

The philosophy of wellbeing: Elina Grigoriou in conversation

The philosophy of wellbeing: Elina Grigoriou in conversation

philosophy of wellbeingElina Grigorou is the author of a fantastic book called Wellbeing in Interiors: Philosophy, Design & Value in Practice. The book looks not only at the ways organisations can use design to address the wellbeing of individuals, but also the impact this approach has on them as individuals in terms of their creativity and productivity. This in turn can have a transformative impact on the organisations for which they work. More →

Workplace Geeks assemble. Workplace heavyweights launch new podcast series

Workplace Geeks assemble. Workplace heavyweights launch new podcast series

Two leading workplace commentators have collaborated to launch a brand new podcast that strives to uncover cutting edge academic research from around the world and bring it to a broader audience. The Workplace Geeks podcast interviews the teams behind the research, explores the stories behind the insights and uncovers the practical business applications of their findings. Created and co-hosted by regular industry commentators Chris Moriarty (formerly of IWFM and Leesman) and Ian Ellison (3edges and formerly of Sheffield Hallam University) the podcast surfaces evidence-based insights, whilst taking listeners on a ‘journey of discovery’ as they explore data, research methods and how the business world can better apply and benefit from them. More →

Workplace data proves that the devil is in the detail for the new era of work

Workplace data proves that the devil is in the detail for the new era of work

workplace data and the future of workPredicting the future is a fool’s errand. History is littered with examples of people who got it horribly wrong. In 1876, William Orten, the president of then telegraphy pioneer Western Union, claimed that the telephone was an idiotic, ungainly and impractical idea that would never catch on. Almost a century later, Microsoft’s Bill Gates said that nobody would ever need more than 640KB of memory in a computer. Today’s home computers and laptops can store up to 32GB of memory. More →

Just two weeks to go until the inaugural Workspace Design Show

Just two weeks to go until the inaugural Workspace Design Show

In just two weeks, the much-anticipated Workspace Design Show will open its doors for the first time, welcoming the commercial interiors community to discover and discuss tomorrow’s places of work at London’s Business Design Centre from 4-5 November 2021. More →

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