Search Results for: CSR

Over half of workers believe their company should invest in CSR

Over half of workers believe their company should invest in CSR

Over half (59 percent) of UK workers believe their business should invest in charitable initiatives. Those within the age bracket of 18-29 are most likely to have this viewpoint, with two-thirds (67 percent) admitting to feeling this way, compared to just under half (48 percent) of those aged 50 and above. That’s according to new research from Qualtrics, which conducted a study of 500 UK employees about their views on workplace initiatives and the importance of CSR. More →

Younger workers’ CSR ethics don’t necessarily extend to older generation

Younger workers' CSR ethics don't extend to the older generation

Is ageism one of the last bastions of accepted prejudice in the UK? Take the Daily Mail’s “night of the living dead” coverage of the Stones’ Glastonbury performance – deemed acceptable where jokes regarding gender, race or disability are not. A new survey illustrates this attitude. Nearly half of younger workers in a recent poll think older colleagues are in danger of stifling their career prospects by retiring later, that their prolonged presence could damage productivity and that they have very little to teach the younger generation. Yet over half (55 per cent) of Generation Y workers questioned in the poll say the ethical credentials of a company would influence their choice of employer. Since the scrapping of the Default Retirement Age (DRA) the number of over-65s in the labour force has exceeded one million, and the survey, carried out for KPMG by OnePoll warns that tensions could rise as the need for employees to stay in the labour force for longer growing due to social and financial pressures. More →

Workplace transformation strategies are an essential element of CSR

CNGLogo

Adopting 21st-century workplace practices that meet the needs of employers and employees is an important form of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), according to a new corporate real estate (CRE) industry advocacy statement by CoreNet Global. The report finds the nature of work is “changing dramatically, transcending the traditional definitions of productivity to include the concepts of enabling work, employee engagement, employee satisfaction and employee wellness, framed around an emerging ‘work-life support’ business model.” More →

Volunteering boosts employees during lockdown, research claims

Volunteering boosts employees during lockdown, research claims

VolunteeringAs companies struggle to motivate teams working remotely, new research by the charity Education and Employers and the CIPD, claims that employers who support their staff with volunteering in schools and colleges has found employees to be more motivated, more productive and have a better sense of well-being. More →

Giving CEOs financial incentives seems to damage long-term profitability

Giving CEOs financial incentives seems to damage long-term profitability

IncentivesThe greater stress companies put on financial incentives and financial performance in bonus systems for CEOs, the more negative the impact is on the firm’s financial performance, claims new research from Vlerick Business School. These findings come from a research study into the top 600 European firms and their CEOs remuneration. More →

The weakness of purpose and the shift to problem-solving

The weakness of purpose and the shift to problem-solving

A man with purpose and a direct approach to problemsBlackRock is one of the largest asset management companies on the planet. Each year, at the start of January, the CEO Larry Fink writes a letter addressed to the other CEOs of the world. In his New Year’s letter for 2020, Fink appealed in particular to his fellow CEOs’ sense of social responsibility. In particular, he focused in on the risks faced by the climate. “Climate risk is an investment risk,” and he called on all companies, both public and private, to create greater societal added value. “Society is looking increasingly to companies to solve social and economic problems,” he concludes, so asset managers should be encouraged to invest in companies with a ‘purpose’. More →

Supplier codes of conduct can be ineffective in practice

Supplier codes of conduct can be ineffective in practice

A new white paper claims that while supplier codes of conduct are important, they are ineffective if their requirements are not met with actions to bring about transparency. To be effective, codes of conduct should support an authentic determination to embed company values and to foster strong business relationships that encourage honest communication and transparency that include monitoring the effectiveness. More →

Trust from the boss outweighs all other factors for employee happiness

Trust from the boss outweighs all other factors for employee happiness

Trust

While some organisations have welcomed remote working with open arms, other employers have struggled to trust their employees to work autonomously with some even ramping up on surveillance to track exactly what their workforce is doing. This may however be problematic for organisations looking to attract and retain talent as, according to a recent report from UK-based tech-for-good developer, Culture Shift, almost all (93 percent) of Britain’s workforce say having an employer that trusts them is important for their overall happiness at work.  More →

An opportunity to take business relationships with charities to a new level

An opportunity to take business relationships with charities to a new level

COVID-19 can be a catalyst for transforming how businesses and charities collaborate, with significant benefits for both. Companies and charities working together is nothing new. For many years Corporate Social Responsibility has had a place on the business agenda, as a means of doing some good while boosting companies’ reputations in the process. More →

Many workers believe leaders fail to understand their challenges

Many workers believe leaders fail to understand their challenges

One in five (21 percent) UK workers have admitted that their senior management teams do not understand the general challenges they regularly face. That’s according to new research from employee experience consultancy Qualtrics, which conducted a study of 500 UK employees about their views on workplace initiatives and the importance of CSR. More →

Family firms focus more on corporate social responsibility

Family firms focus more on corporate social responsibility

corporate social responsibilityCompanies owned by families pay more attention to issues of corporate social responsibility (CSR), such as sustainability and environmental issues, according to research from Vlerick Business School, but the research also found that attention to CSR decreases as the company is handed down to the next generations. Dr. Kerstin Fehre, Professor of Strategy at Vlerick Business School, alongside Dr. Florian Weber from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, studied family firms and the attention they gave to CSR compared to non-family firms. The study, published in the journal Business Ethics: A European Review, used over a hundred of the largest HDAX listed companies in Germany and analysed messages to shareholders published in annual reports. More →

The future of work will be defined by four models, claims RSA

The future of work will be defined by four models, claims RSA

The RSA’s Future Work Centre has released research that models four ‘futures of work’ by 2035 – and claims to show how out of touch politicians are with changes in the workplace. The report, published in partnership with Arup, claims to avoid the usual sensationalism around topics such as automation, the Internet of Things, surveillance, gig work and AI to establish what workers can expect in the workplace in the near future. The report applies morphological analysis  to generate its four models of work.

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