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Many flexible office users would prefer to work in conventional space

Many flexible office users would prefer to work in conventional space

Many people would prefer conventional offices to flexible office spaceJoint-research from Gensler and the British Council of Offices (BCO) on the rise of flexible workspace in the UK corporate sector claims that 40 percent of flexible office users would rather work from a conventional office. According to the report, while the future of coworking is increasingly being explored as part of academic and industry research, there has been limited focus on what it means for large corporate occupiers. The 2019 Rise of Flexible Workspace in the Corporate Sector Report (choir members only) aims to identify the drivers of and the barriers to – the use of flexible space and coworking by large corporate occupiers. More →

Offices iQ launches flexible corporate space solution Enterprise iQ

Offices iQ launches flexible corporate space solution Enterprise iQ

Offices iQ, the broker of flexible office and coworking space, has announced the launch of Enterprise iQ, a global end-to-end service that includes ongoing customer support. With flexible working spaces set to grow by up to 30 percent annually for the next five years across Europe, Enterprise iQ will service the growing number of corporate companies looking for flexible office space. More →

Back to workplace basics, the joy and pain of work, squeezing people in and some other stuff

Back to workplace basics, the joy and pain of work, squeezing people in and some other stuff

A coworking workplace in Chengdu by WeWorkLet’s get the inevitable WeWork story out of the way first. A supposed news item in Crain’s New York Business has claimed that WeWork is ‘squeezing’ people into half the space recommended in the BCO’s Specification Guide; “roughly the size of two standard doors laying side by side”. You can see the editorial cogs at work here, combining a story about WeWork with one about how people are crammed into the workplace like cattle these days.

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Coworking continues to reshape property markets worldwide

Coworking continues to reshape property markets worldwide

Epicenter Coworking Space in StockholmAgainst a global backdrop of diminishing business confidence and a weaker outlook for economic growth, a robust labour market in the world’s largest economies continues to underpin demand for office space with high employment levels prevalent across a number of major markets. Demand continues to be driven by the knowledge economy, with the coworking boom continuing to broaden its reach across major markets, forcing traditional landlords to adapt their offering in order to best accommodate existing and potential occupiers. More →

A grey tsunami, three goldfish, the red pill of coworking and some other colourful stuff

A grey tsunami, three goldfish, the red pill of coworking and some other colourful stuff

A right leaning think tank’s suggestion that the UK should set a new retirement age of 75 and introduce a range of measures to extend people’s working lives to boost the economy and improve people’s wellbeing sparked an inevitable paroxysm of rage. Immediately followed by an equally inevitable and furious level of what passes for debate these days. A stramash the Scottish would call it. More →

Flexible offices continue to dominate UK property market

Flexible offices continue to dominate UK property market

flexible offices dominate UK propertyTake-up across the UK’s ‘Big Nine’ regional office markets rose to 2.3 million square feet during second quarter of 2019 according to the latest market update from property advisors Avison Young. This is up ten percent up on a 10-year average, with activity was skewed towards flexible offices, larger deals, city centres and the technology media and telecoms sector.  More →

Flexible office revolution shows no signs of slowing

Flexible office revolution shows no signs of slowing

The latest research from JLL, Disruption or distraction, where next for the UK flex market sector, claims that the real revolution of flexible office space lies in the variety of solutions now on offer and that the market has seen more changes over the last three years than the previous 30 combined as it continues to grow and evolve. JLL’s research claims that over the next five years more than 10m sq ft will be added to the stock in the key UK cities and flex space will account for over 8.5 percent of the total office stock by 2023. More →

Coworking is now the key driver of change in property market

Coworking is now the key driver of change in property market

Having disrupted the property sector over the last decade, coworking continues to impact investors, developers and end users as the concept appears to be the dominant force in the commercial sector. Coworking can trace its roots back as far as the 1980s when Regus (now part of IWG) popularised the idea of a serviced office, by taking on leases of office buildings, subdividing the available space and leasing it out to small business, fully furnished and ready to rent. More →

Coworking is reshaping office market in London

Coworking is reshaping office market in London

Leo coworking space in North LondonThe flexible office and coworking markets have grown rapidly over the last five years, with more than 4 million sq ft leased to flexible office providers in Central London, according to a new report from digital office broker Hubble in partnership with JLL. Despite WeWork dominating the headlines and pioneering the uptake of coworking, the London market remains highly fragmented, with more than 150 providers offering some form of flex or coworking space in more than 650 separate locations. Flexible offices are projected to grow to a 11 percent share of overall office stock in London by 2023. At the end of 2018, flexible offices had a 6.3 percent share of the Central London market (14.7 million sq. ft.) and this number is set to keep growing. More →

Coworking disrupts office design

Coworking disrupts office design 0

In his book How Buildings Learn, the author Stewart Brand outlines the process whereby buildings evolve over time to meet the changing needs of their occupants. He describes each building as consisting of six layers, each of which functions on a different timescale. These range from the site itself which has a life cycle measured in centuries, through to the building (decades), interior fit out (years), technology (months), to stuff (days). The effectiveness of a design will depend on how well it resolves the tensions that exist between these layers of the building, and this is one of the benefits of coworking that isn’t discussed enough.

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Office design stifling creativity, claims study

Office design stifling creativity, claims study

WeWork offices in London are a great example of modern office designBritish businesses could be hindering their own innovation and creativity due to poor office design, according to a study carried out by YouGov and commissioned by Oktra. The survey of over 2,000 British employees claims that fewer than half (43 percent) believe the design of their workplace encourages innovation and creativity. Over a third (36 percent) of respondents would be less likely to take sick days if they worked in an inspiring workplace. More →

The meteor strike of coworking and the beasts that will remain

The meteor strike of coworking and the beasts that will remain

The concept of coworking has only been with us for a short time, but there are already signs that it is evolving into something rather different. The most common misperception about the way evolution works is that it is based on some steady progression, driven by the merciless principle of survival of the fittest, with the best adapted climbing towards the top of an evolutionary tree. This gives rise to one of the most common questions posed by sceptics: if we evolved from apes, why are there still apes?

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