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Overconfidence can be misinterpreted as competence, claims study

Overconfidence can be misinterpreted as competence, claims study

The higher a person rates their social class, the more likely they are to overestimate their talents and the more likely they are to be promoted to a level beyond their competence, a new study from researchers at Stanford and the University of Virginia claims. According to the study published by the American Psychological Association in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,  people who see themselves as being in a higher social class tend to have an exaggerated belief that they are more adept than their equally capable lower-class counterparts, and that overconfidence can often be misinterpreted by others as greater competence in important situations, such as job interviews.

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Flexible working for parents greatest challenge for SMEs

Flexible working for parents greatest challenge for SMEs

Woman working at desk illustrates challenges facing firms who want to offer flexible working to parentsPaid leave for new parents is a financial and operational challenge for 90 percent of UK SMEs, according to the findings of new research into the challenges faced by working women and their employers. The first ever Women in Business survey also claims that offering flexible working and covering the cost and resource of maternity and paternity leave is an even bigger concern for SMEs, with 96 percent of board level executives saying it’s a significant challenge for their business. More →

Bristol has lowest Grade A office vacancy rate among UK largest cities

Bristol has lowest Grade A office vacancy rate among UK largest cities

Bristol has the lowest vacancy rate for Grade A offices amongst the UK’s leading Big 6 cities, reflecting strong demand combined with a shortage of high quality commercial space, according to new figures published by property consultants JLL.  Although the city and region’s reputation for talent and innovation has so far countered the shortage of space, with inward investors citing access to a highly skilled, graduate workforce as one of the main reasons for relocation, JLL is warning that more needs to be done to ensure Bristol continues to attract investment. More →

Shining a light on remote work at Google, willing slaves to tech, why design matters and some other stuff

Shining a light on remote work at Google, willing slaves to tech, why design matters and some other stuff

Away from you know what, one of the most talked about issues this week was the news that the smart devices we’re voluntarily incorporating into our homes are not just obeying us but acting as microphones on our lives. This is happening in the context of growing mistrust of the world’s tech giants, uncertainty about our relationship with technology and taps into a primal fear about control and surveillance. All of this is complicated by the fact that these systems of surveillance are not the telescreens of 1984 but the products of private sector firms who currently often exhibit ‘power without responsibility’, as Kipling once said about the media. More →

Smartphone addiction is driven by need to connect, but means we make bad choices

Smartphone addiction is driven by need to connect, but means we make bad choices

Two new studies published in the Journal Frontiers in Psychology explore our complex relationships with smartphones. The first study from Canadian researchers, concludes that our addiction to smartphones is a real phenomenon but one that is rooted in a primal desire to connect with other people, suggesting that smartphone addiction is best described as hyper-social, rather than anti-social. However, the second study led by academics in Brazil claims that a pronounced preoccupation with smartphones can lead to poorer decision making.

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Why are graduates favouring Manchester over London?

Why are graduates favouring Manchester over London?

streetview of Manchester, Piccadilly GardensThe economic performance of UK cities is increasingly dependent on the skills of their workforce. Cities across the UK face the challenge of both attracting and retaining high-skilled talent. The Great British Brain Drain investigates migration within the UK, specifically within cities. It finds that many university cities lose their graduates to London, with this movement especially strong for the highest performing graduates with 2.1 or 1st class degrees from Russell Group universities. Despite this, most university cities experience a ‘graduate gain’: they gain more graduates than they lose.

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Time to unlearn the time management system you learned at school

Time to unlearn the time management system you learned at school

Picture a workplace where everyone follows rigorous to-do lists. Employees are told what to do, how long to spend on it, and in what order to tackle their projects. Then, picture a workplace where there are no to-do lists, no project deadlines, and no estimations of how long projects will take. Employees tackle work in the order they choose, when they feel like doing it. Which workplace do you think will be more successful?

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A four day week, people-watching at work, the art of AI and some other stuff

A four day week, people-watching at work, the art of AI and some other stuff

While the recent Finnish pilot of universal basic income had mixed results, a trial of the other most talked about solution to our problem with work – the four day week – has been reported as far more promising. A New Zealand financial services firm called Perpetual Guardian switched its 240 staff from a five-day to a four-day week last November and maintained their pay. The results (registration) included a 20 percent rise in productivity and improved staff wellbeing and engagement.

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World Bank report calls for changing approach to working cultures

World Bank report calls for changing approach to working cultures

A new report from the World Bank has call for more investment in people to prepare them for the economies of the future. The 2019 World Development report (WDR) “The Changing Nature of Work” claims that digital technologies are driving the demand for advanced cognitive skills, socio-behavioral skills, and adaptability in labour markets. The digital economy also presents an opportunity to create more jobs.

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Large numbers of ethnic minorities in UK prevented from meeting career goals

Large numbers of ethnic minorities in UK prevented from meeting career goals

Large numbers of ethnic minorities in UK held back from meeting career goals

More than half (55 percent) of ethnic minority workers have been advised to be ‘more realistic’ about their career aspirations, according to The Equality Group, which commissioned a nationally representative study that delves into UK ethnic minority citizens, their career aspirations, and the inequalities that still challenge the nation’s BAME community in the world of work It found that while 59 percent of the ethnic minority workforce aspire to be on the board, just 2 percent make it and with 46 percent of ethnic minorities being advised to commence a career NOT relevant to their skills or interests it’s hardly surprising that half do not have any ethnic minority leadership role models.  The research is launched amidst industry data that shows only 84 of the 1,048 directors in the FTSE100, originate from an ethnic minority. More →

Line up of speakers announced for Workplace Trends: Research Spring Summit

Line up of speakers announced for Workplace Trends: Research Spring Summit

The research-driven Workplace Trends Spring Summit returns for 2019. We have two sessions with invited guest speakers, our keynote and the after lunch debate. Following a recent Call for Abstracts and a blind peer review by our two moderators for the day, Nigel Oseland (Workplace Unlimited) and Mark Eltringham (Workplace Insight), the remaining sessions have now been filled with the highest ranked submissions.

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Gen Z are technologically literate but not actually robots, Dell study confirms

Gen Z are technologically literate but not actually robots, Dell study confirms

Generation Z is entering the workforce, bringing with it a tech-first mentality that will propel businesses further into the digital era while potentially deepening the divide among five generations in the workplace. According to global research commissioned by Dell Technologies, post-millennials – those born after 1996 and known as Gen Z – have a deep, universal understanding of technology and its potential to transform how we work and live.

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