Search Results for: fathers

Women less likely to progress at work than male colleagues after childbirth

Women less likely to progress at work than male colleagues after childbirth

women at work Women and men experience a ‘large divergence’ in their career paths in the years following childbirth, according to a study following more than 3,500 new parents. Only 27.8 percent of women are in full-time work or self-employed three years after childbirth, compared to 90 percent of new fathers. And while 26 percent of men have been promoted or moved to a better job in the five years following childbirth, the figure is just 13 percent for women.

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Women still face broken rungs on the career ladder

Women still face broken rungs on the career ladder

More women than ever before occupy senior executive positions, but true gender parity hasn’t yet been reached and women continue to face unique challenges in their careers according to the latest Women in the Workplace Report from LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Company. This year’s study—which is based on data and insights from 329 companies employing over 13 million people and more than 68,500 employees—identifies a key point on the corporate ladder where women lose the most ground: the first step up to manager. If companies fixed this broken rung, it could add one million more women to management in corporate America over the next 5 years. More →

Working Families announces the most family friendly workplaces in the UK 

Working Families announces the most family friendly workplaces in the UK 

working familiesWork-life balance charity Working Families has announced its annual list of the top family-friendly employers in the UK. Employers large and small from across the public, private, and third sectors compete annually to gain a coveted place on the charity’s list of Top Employers for Working Families. The announcement coincides with Working Families’ National Work Life Week campaign. More →

Organisations must meet needs of young parents or risk failure

Organisations must meet needs of young parents or risk failure

Organisations face a problem that could impact their very survival. Parents want to be supported by their employers during the transition to becoming working parents, but organisations are currently ill-equipped to deal with parental leave, or to keep people engaged throughout it. In a world of relentless change, companies failing to react to and meet the expectations of this part of their workforce risk disaster. More →

Summertime childcare juggling needs to be consigned to history

Summertime childcare juggling needs to be consigned to history

flexible working for dadsFor working parents, summertime is often a logistical nightmare. Six weeks of careful planning are needed to sort out childcare and ensure that both parents spend some quality time with their offspring. According to research from family activity app Hoop, over a quarter of parents of 5-16 year olds dread the summer holidays and here are some of the main reasons why. More →

Working dads say their schedule means missing out on children growing up

Working dads say their schedule means missing out on children growing up

One in five dads says their working schedule means they are missing out on seeing their children growing up, claims Quinyx. The research highlights the importance of opening up flexible working to all members of the workforce, including working dads and the impact the rigidness of the current system is having on families. 17 percent of working dads say their work schedule makes them feel like they are missing out on seeing their children grow up. More →

The tipping point for flexible working arrives

The tipping point for flexible working arrives

Although people have been talking about flexible working in one way or another for decades – the economist John Maynard Keynes declared in 1930 that technological advances would lead to a 15-hour working week – we may now be at the tipping point where work takes on an entirely different character. More →

Take up of shared parental leave constrained by traditional attitudes

Take up of shared parental leave constrained by traditional attitudes

a father and child illustrating the importance of shared parental leaveDespite the introduction of shared parental leave rights, more than half of UK adults still think that women be the primary carers of babies and children, according to the latest British Social Attitudes Survey. Despite this, there has been a notable shift in attitudes over the last seven years, according to the researchers from the National Centre for Social Research. More →

Closing the gender pay gap needs more than final ideas of Theresa May

Closing the gender pay gap needs more than final ideas of Theresa May

Gender pay gap needs better ideas than those of Theresa MayTheresa May has spent her final few weeks in office trying to salvage a meaningful prime ministerial legacy from the long shadow of her failed Brexit strategy. Part of this effort is her plan to introduce 12 weeks’ paternity leave for new fathers, as part of her drive to reduce the UK’s gender pay gap. It is proposed that employers would pay fathers for the first four weeks of paternity leave at 90 percent of their normal salary, while the remaining eight weeks would be unpaid. This is intended to reduce the gender pay gap by increasing the sharing of parental responsibilities, and freeing mothers up to return to work earlier. More →

Rise in employment discrimination claims by new parents

Rise in employment discrimination claims by new parents

Rise in employment discrimination claims by new parentsNearly three quarter (70 percent) of employment law experts have seen an increase in women claiming they were fired when on maternity leave; the use of ‘gagging orders’ following pregnancy and maternity related disputes and an increase in men claiming harassment by their employer for taking paternity leave.

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Overconfidence can be misinterpreted as competence, claims study

Overconfidence can be misinterpreted as competence, claims study

The higher a person rates their social class, the more likely they are to overestimate their talents and the more likely they are to be promoted to a level beyond their competence, a new study from researchers at Stanford and the University of Virginia claims. According to the study published by the American Psychological Association in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,  people who see themselves as being in a higher social class tend to have an exaggerated belief that they are more adept than their equally capable lower-class counterparts, and that overconfidence can often be misinterpreted by others as greater competence in important situations, such as job interviews.

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Employers still not doing enough to support working parents

Employers still not doing enough to support working parents

Working Families and Bright Horizons have launched a new report which focuses on flexible working and the reality of flexible jobs from the perspective of working parents in the UK. According to the report, the experience of parents shows that flexible working is widespread, although patchy in some sectors and for some workers. It is beneficial in helping parents get a better work life fit, although it is not a panacea. Issues around job design, workloads and organisational culture undermine some of the benefits of flexibility, and proper management of flexibility to ensure it works is, for many parents, missing. More →