Search Results for: job interview

Far from being on board, older women still face recruitment bias

Far from being on board, older women still face recruitment bias 0

Women over 50 most likely to face recruitment biasThe news that the Davies review has met its 25 per cent target for female representation on boards, and is now considering setting a target that a quarter of executives at FTSE 100 companies should be female, has been met with approval by the Institute of Directors, which said it was right that the focus is on increasing the number of women in senior executive positions. But what about those further down the salary scale, where many older women struggle to even get a job interview? A recent study carried out by Anglia Ruskin University’s Lord Ashcroft International Business School shows that older jobseekers face widespread discrimination in the UK, with older female applicants more likely to experience bias than men. The study found no significant link between a company having a HR department or providing commitments to equal opportunities, and the level of discrimination it displayed.

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Staff calling in sick could be a symptom of management malaise

If your office seems strangely quiet this morning it might be due to the fact today is ‘national sickie day’. The first Monday in February is the day of the year which traditionally sees the highest number of workers calling in sick. It’s been argued that many of these people could in fact be looking for a new job, but whether your staff are sick or on a job interview, these absences may be indicative of a deeper problem, and it in all probability lies with the quality of their managers. According to recent research, one in seven people (16%) have had to take sick leave due to a bad manager and a fifth of people would turn down a job offer if their new manager had a bad reputation. The research also found that those who find themselves being poorly managed are more likely to take radical action and leave a job than tackle the issue with their HR department.

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Four simple ways to embrace neurodiversity in the workplace

Four simple ways to embrace neurodiversity in the workplace

Around a fifth of people have some form of neurodiversity, so it's essential that the workplace is as welcoming as possible It is thought that up to 20 percent of the UK population is neurodivergent and while many companies now are more educated on the need for diversity, many still have some way to go to adapt their workplaces both culturally and physically to ensure these individuals feel they are truly supported, valued, respected and able to the excel in their role. Sadly, a recent study by Birkbeck found that 65 percent of employees with a form of neurodiversity fear discrimination at work, despite companies increasingly recognising the need for inclusivity. More →

Not luddite dinosaurs but the sensible voice of caution on AI. And you need to listen

Not luddite dinosaurs but the sensible voice of caution on AI. And you need to listen

In my line of work, it is easy to get away with not being au fait with technology. Having previously laughed off my ineptitude saying ‘there’s a reason I work with people not machines!’ I never considered I had a place in the realm of all things IT and computers. Until I discovered AI. More specifically, Deep Neural Networks. With a specialism in Neuropsychology, I was intrigued by a discipline that aimed to recreate that which we barely understand; the human brain. One of my favourite (and most frustrating) realisations when I began studying more than twenty years ago, was that I could dedicate myself to learning about the human brain 24/7 for the rest of my life… and still barely scratch the surface. Yet here was an AI community telling me they could recreate it. I was beyond intrigued and so began my unexpected delve into the world of all things machine learning and I haven’t looked back. More →

Some questions about AI, a world drowning in content and the human centipede of creativity

Some questions about AI, a world drowning in content and the human centipede of creativity

 

We still don't even know what questions to ask about AI, so the idea we can provide answers is a bit premature

One unintended but welcome result of the new fixation with AI is that many of the people who became experts on the workplace in 2020 are now experts on AI. You’ll find them on social media and they’ll have written a book about it by May to sit on the shelf alongside the one about hybrid working and The Great Resignation. So, if you want some certainty about where generative AI taking us, go talk to one of them because people who know about the subject seem to have little or no idea or raise even more questions. More →

Being furloughed affected people’s sense of time and relationship with work

Being furloughed affected people’s sense of time and relationship with work

Between March 2020 and September 2021, millions of workers furloughed under the UK government’s Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme lived what for many of us is a dream: being paid not to work. Through interviews, I’ve researched the impact of this time on 35 people who were furloughed under the scheme. I found that for some, furlough created opportunities for reflection and growth, but for most of my interviewees it was a time of uncertainty and disorientation. More →

Half of neurodiverse people missing work due to lack of workplace support

Half of neurodiverse people missing work due to lack of workplace support

City & Guilds’ annual Neurodiversity Index shines a light on the challenges faced by neurodiverse people in the workplaceCity & Guilds’ annual Neurodiversity Index, published today following a government-backed review of autism employment, and ahead of Neurodiversity Week, shines a light on the challenges faced by neurodiverse people in the workplace, with half of those surveyed having been off work last year due to their condition. The second edition of the annual Neurodiversity Index, published by City & Guilds Foundation in partnership with Do-IT solutions, surveys over 600 individuals and organisations. The findings show that 36 percent of neurodivergent employees do not  receive any guidance or support in their workplace setting, while 20 percent are still waiting for adjustments to be put in place. More →

Fear of judgement prevents working parents from using beneficial workplace policies and support

Fear of judgement prevents working parents from using beneficial workplace policies and support

Although many organisations say they recognise the value in supporting working parents many are still failing to see significant or lasting changeAlthough many organisations say they recognise the value in supporting working parents many are still failing to see significant or lasting change, according to a report published by working WOMBA (Work, Me and the Baby), in partnership with Hult International Business School (Ashridge). According to the report,  The priority actions for boards to drive equal opportunities for working parents, many working parents do not use the policies, support and benefits available to them because they fear being judged negatively by colleagues and managers, and worry about the consequences of doing so on career progression. More →

CEOs remain optimistic about short term growth, quarter are planning to replace people with AI

CEOs remain optimistic about short term growth, quarter are planning to replace people with AI

A quarter of CEOs intend to cut their headcounts by at least five percent "due to generative AIThe proportion of CEOs who believe global economic growth will improve over the next 12-months has more than doubled. At the same time, the proportion of CEOs concerned about their long-term business viability has risen to 45 percent as tech and climate pressures accelerate, according to PwC’s 27th Annual Global CEO Survey. However the survey, published to coincide with the annual World Economic Forum jamboree in Davos, also reports that artificial intelligence will result in dramatic job losses in 2024 and beyond. A quarter intend to cut their headcounts by at least five percent “due to generative AI. More →

Technology is stealing your time in ways you may not realise

Technology is stealing your time in ways you may not realise

Technology is supposed to make our lives easier. Smart phones provide a palm-size window to the world, enabling us to do almost anything at the touch of a button. Smart homes look after themselves, and virtual meetings mean that for many, time spent commuting is a thing of the past. So we should have more free time. Time which is now spent sleeping, relaxing or simply doing nothing – right? More →

Sound and vision – Nigel Oseland makes himself heard for the IN magazine profile

Sound and vision – Nigel Oseland makes himself heard for the IN magazine profile

Nigel Oseland opens up about people and places for IN Magazine

Interviewing people involves trying to tease out a bit of personal colour. Sometimes I already know what that is or might be. That is certainly the case with Nigel Oseland who I have known for many years, know to be from Wolverhampton and who studied psychology and computer science at Keele University in my home town. He went on to focus on environmental psychology while working at the Building Research Establishment in Watford in the late 1980s and 1990s. More →

A bit of alien thinking on coffee and some other BS

A bit of alien thinking on coffee and some other BS

I’ve sometimes highlighted how our perceptions of the workplace are subject to an apex fallacy. The daily consumption of narratives about campuses, tech palaces and ‘cool’ design can obscure the fact that most people don’t experience this stuff in their daily lives. They work in adequate or possibly nice offices. Some in shabby offices or horrible offices. Many travel into work at the same time each day and sit with roughly the same people and do roughly the same things. They may work from home more frequently now, but they have a routine there too. Most will work in a mundane or nice home that mirrors the mundane office that awaits at the other end of the commute. More →