The most read workplace stories from the last twelve months

The most read workplace stories from the last twelve months

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Sky Central workplaceOne of the greatest joys of online publishing is the opportunity it offers to reflect on the demonstrable preoccupations and interests of an informed audience. We can see what professionals see as the most important issues they face by what they read in the UK’s most widely read publication in its field. It’s especially heartening to see that those do not include the usual glib misdirections about Millennials, gimmicky office design, robots, open plan and ‘trends’ that have been more or less commonplace for years. We can leave those to others. Instead you have been seeking out stories that challenge the lazy mainstream narratives, reflect the reality of the endlessly shifting landscape of work, understand the challenges involved and retain a focus on the human beings at the centre of it all. So, here are the ten most read pieces from Workplace Insight published over the past 365 days.  More →

Seven workplace design and management stories that you must read this week

Seven workplace design and management stories that you must read this week

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The jingle jangle of work non-work balance

Productive healthy ageing and musculoskeletal health

Understanding modern work in an age of insecurity

The death of employee engagement or a happy ending?

Is the era of management over?

The paradox of choice in the workplace

Ten workplace meta-trends for 2018 (really)

Seven workplace stories that have caught our attention this week

Seven workplace stories that have caught our attention this week

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Microsoft’s blueprint for its new headquarters

How work changed to make us all passionate quitters

Workplaces send subconscious signals to people

Ten workplace meta-trends for 2018

Why are we convinced robots will take our jobs despite the evidence?

One in seven employers won’t hire a woman who might have children

The real risk of automation is boredom

Seven workplace stories that have made us stop and think this week

Seven workplace stories that have made us stop and think this week

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Why cities are full of uncomfortable benches

Regulating AI before we reach the tech singularity

What you need to know about Germany’s plans to scrap the 8 hour day

As tech firms mature, so do their headquarters

Managers aren’t doing enough to prepare staff for the future

How the sandwich consumed Britain

A robot has passed a medical licencing exam

White Paper: intuitive design and the changing face of workplace interactions

White Paper: intuitive design and the changing face of workplace interactions

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In his famous 1988 book The Design of Everyday Things, the cognitive scientist Donald Norman suggests that the way we interact with objects and our surroundings is determined almost entirely by their design. People cannot be the primary reason things succeed or fail, because they are constant, while the design of the object itself is the variable. People can expect to learn how to use things better, but without an underlying people-centric and intuitive approach to design, the design will fail to some degree or other. He concludes that the designer should focus their attention on the interaction between people and the design of objects and surroundings. This principle becomes more relevant with each passing day, as the number of interactions we have with designed objects increases. This is most obvious with regard to our interactions with technology, but it is also apparent across our entire lives.

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It’s just life now: Debra Ward in conversation with Mark Eltringham

It’s just life now: Debra Ward in conversation with Mark Eltringham

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There is currently a great deal of talk about the way people experience the workplace. It is a subject linked to the changing nature of work but also a growing awareness that the old demarcations of time and place are falling, and with them the demarcations between the workplace professions.  This subject may be topical but it has been a long term preoccupation for today’s guest on the podcast Debra Ward. Earlier this year Debra joined JLL in the new role of Strategy & Growth Director and one of her first aims has been to focus on the firm’s approach to human experience. This is encapsulated in a major global report on the subject but it’s one that Debra has always championed in here previous roles with MITIE, Macro and Condeco.  Debra is forthright, informed, bright and passionate. Everything you need in a podcast in fact.

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The workplace sector responds to the 2017 UK Autumn Budget

The workplace sector responds to the 2017 UK Autumn Budget

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Yesterday, the Chancellor Philip Hammond announced the details of the UK government’s latest budget. While Brexit inevitably cast its shadow over the whole thing, there were a number of announcements relevant to the workplace, construction, tech and built environment sectors, many of which have been broadly welcomed by commentators, industry bodies and experts. Among the announcements in the budget were new plans for infrastructure and planning, skills and training, the environment, productivity, AI and regional development.

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The missing LINC between the office and the future of work

The missing LINC between the office and the future of work

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There is a theory that if you want to know how the economy is doing, you ask a taxi driver. The basis for this idea is that they are the first to know when money is getting tight, because people make more use of buses and tubes. In a similar way, one of the best ways of gauging workplace trends is to ask an office furniture company. They’ve always functioned in a fiercely competitive market, but are also the first to notice an economic downturn or a shift in the structure of their markets.

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Seven stories about people, places and technology we’ve been reading this week

Seven stories about people, places and technology we’ve been reading this week

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How to navigate beyond sustainability buzzwords

The communist party offices around the world

Hawking’s fear that AI may replace humans altogether

Tech giants are transforming Sydney’s business district

How AI will transform the employee experience

Promotion improves men’s job satisfaction but not women’s

Why we value physical objects over digital

The contribution of personality to the performance of agile workers

The contribution of personality to the performance of agile workers

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The introduction of agile working into organisations has typically focussed on the workstyles of different job roles, but has tended to treat the jobholders within these groups in the same way. The successful introduction of new ways of working clearly relies on the willingness of the people occupying the job roles to embrace new ways of working; yet there has been little investigation of the needs of agile workers with different personality types beyond looking at the needs of extroverts and introverts. These studies have tended to focus on the workplace; for example, the Cushman Wakefield Workplace Programme briefing paper examines how organisations can accommodate the needs of extroverts and introverts working together in the workplace. However, using OCEAN personality profiles, Nigel Oseland found that different personality types have different preferences, which in turn are likely to affect their performance at work.

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Seven workplace stories we’ve been reading this week

Seven workplace stories we’ve been reading this week

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UK law firms chop staff space despite headcount growth

What 15 minutes of solitude does for your emotions

Like it or not, popularity at work still matters

How younger men can help to break the glass ceiling

What do small businesses really contribute to the economy?

What technology will mean for traditional real estate models

Poor posture in people with disabilities can be fatal

Image: Claremont Group Interiors

Seven workplace stories we have been reading this week

Seven workplace stories we have been reading this week

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The link between air pollution and worker productivity

Amazon’s wish list for it new HQ and what it means for the future of cities

WeWork in talks to buy £785 million London project

The startup era may be ending in the tech sector

Rocking and rolling with the new era of workplaces

Is Google’s plan for smart cities an attempt to control them?

Offices that embrace the idea of a human workplace

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